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Full text of "Summer session general announcement"

L I B RAHY 

OF THE 

UN IVLRSITY 

Of ILLINOIS 

C 
Jo9saZS 

1912-32 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/summersessionge1222iowa 



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IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

OF 

AGRICULTURE AND 
MECHANIC ARTS 






<^>urnmer l^lbL 



AMES 




SUMMER SESSION 
June 17 to July 26, 1912 



Vol. X 



BULLETIN 



No. 7 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



OF 



AGRICULTURE JOTF 1 ™ <* iujnu* 
MECHANIC ARTS 




CENTRAL BUILDING 



SUMMER SESSION 
GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENT 



APRIL, 1912 
AMES, IOWA 



Published Monthly by the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. En- 
tered as Second-class Matter October 26, 1905, at the Post Office at Ames, Iowa, under the 
Act of July 16, 1904. 




Campanile 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 

J. H. Trewin, Cedar Rapids. 

A. B. Funk, Spirit Lake. 

George T. Baker, Davenport. 

Rodger Leavitt, Cedar Falls. 

D. D. Murphy, Elkader. 

diaries R. Brenton, Dallas Center. 

P. K. Holbrook, Onawa. 

Edward P. Schoentgen, Council Bluffs. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

W. R. Boyd, President, Cedar Rapids. 
Thomas Lambert, Sabula. 

D. A. Emery, Secretary, Ottumwa. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

E. W. Stanton, Acting President, Central Building. 

A. V. Storm, Director of Summer Session, Hall of Agriculture. 
Herman Knapp, Treasurer and Registrar, Central Building. 

SUMMER SCHOOL COUNCIL 

E. W. Stanton, Acting President. 
C. F. Curtiss, Dean of Agriculture. 

W. J. Kennedy, Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

W. If. Stevenson, Professor of Agronomy. 

M. Mortenson, Professor of Dairying. 

Catherine MaeKay, Professor of Home Economics. 

./. B. Davidson, Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

S. A. Beach, Professor of Horticulture. 

F. W. Beckman, Professor of Agricultural Journalism. 
A. V. Storm, Professor of Agricultural Education. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

OF 

AGRICULTURE AND 

MECHANIC ARTS 

SUMMER SESSION 

Ames, Iowa 

June 17 to July 26, 1912 




Hall of Agrici lti rk 



The Summer Session of this college recently established by the State 
Board of Education is for the purpose of placing at the service of the people 
of the State an institution provided by their generosity for the advancement 
of scientific and practical learning. 

There are three great fields of activity now occupied by the Land Grant 
Colleges of our country; viz., Instruction, Experimentation and Extension. 
The policy of all-the-year-round service to the people has long been estab- 
lished in Experimentation and Extension. Instruction, though the first es- 
tablished, is the last to adopt this sound educational and economic policy of 
utilizing the plant, equipment, organization and faculty for the benefit of 
those who can best attend during the summer season. 

Laboratories, live stock, libraries, grain, field plots, museums, orchards, 
forests, machinery, and the other superior facilities used by the regular 
college students will be available for the summer session. 

Conferences on teaching industrial subjects and on rural life conditions 
and methods will be had from time to time. Methods of administration 
and teaching industrial subjects will be given by those fresh from experi- 
ence in the actual problems. 

The practical and yet scientific methods which have given the institu- 
tion a unique place in education will be utilized for the benefit of those who 
can attend during the summer session. 

WHO SHOULD ATTEND 

Any one who desires may attend on payment of the fee. 

The general courses for which no college credit is given are open to 
any persons who feel that they can obtain value from them. The better 
one is educated through schooling and experience the more helpful the 
courses will be, but no one interested need hesitate, for the eminently prac- 
tical character of the work will make it valuable to interested persons of 
even average preparation. 

The college credit courses are open to those who are presumably pre- 
pared to do the work well. A record is kept the same as in regular college 
classes but actual credit will not be given toward a college degree until the 
student lias satisfied college entrance conditions which may be done at any 
time. The records of that student made in college courses given during the 
Summer session will then be transferred to the regular college records for 
a degree. 

County Superintendents who wish to have a better knowledge of these 
Industrial Subjects, in order to more ably and successfully perform their 
duties as educational leaders in the present movement for better and more 
practical education in our rural schools. 

City Superintendents and High School Principals and Teachers 
who wish to make the Agricultural and Home Economics work successful 
under t he State A id law. 

Those who expect to teach Agriculture or Home Economics in high 

Sehoolf next year. 

City Superintendents, High School Principals, and Teachers who 



wish to know more about Agriculture and Domestic Science in order to place 
their High Schools on the accredited list of schools to receive the $500 state 
;ii<l offered under the law. 

City Superintendents and Principals who wish to put some practical 
nature study in their grades or who wish to put some agriculture in their 
High Schools to serve the needs of their Agricultural Communities. 

City Superintendents, Ward Principals, and Teachers who wish to 
forward among their City patrons the great movement for gardening, poul- 
try raising, and care of trees, lawn, and flowers. 

Rural Teachers who see their great responsibility for teaching their 
pupils elementary agriculture and home economics, but who cannot do so 
because of their own lack of preparation. 

Superintendents, Princpials, and Science Teachers who wish to com- 
plete a college course in Agriculture and thus be of larger service by filling 
some of the positions in Normal schools and Colleges requiring men of 
teaching experience and Scientific Agricultural Education and that cannot 
now be properly filled. 

Men and women who wish a course in Manual Training that will fit 
them to conduct this work in City Schools or in Eural Schools. 

Under-graduates who w T ish by Summer work to become better adjusted 
to the sequence of work in their courses or who for sufficient reason find it 
necessary to complete their college course at an early date. 

House Keepers who would like a 
course in Home Work under the most favor- 
able and pleasant circumstances. 

Ministers and Christian Workers 

who desire to be abreast of the times on 
these subjects that are of much interest to 
their constituencies. 

Business and Professional Men and 
Women of all kinds who wish to improve 
their knowledge of any phase of scientific 
or practical agriculture. 

Any who wish to take Music all or a 
part of the time. 

Everybody who wishes a delightful out- 

Campus View i n g a t an institution well known for the 

scientific and practical quality of its work, the excellence of its equipment 

and the sylvan beauty of its campus and surroundings and at the same time 

wishes to pursue chosen lines of work under expert instruction. 




FACULTY 

The Summer Session Faculty will consist of the members of the regular 
College Faculty, and also specialists from other institutions who through 
preparation and experience are especially prepared to render efficient service 
to their classes. 




LECTURES 

There will be day and evening lectures given by members of the faculty 
and others prominent in education and rural sociology. Special lectures will 
be given on the pedagogy of industrial education from time to time. Dur- 
ing rural life week men of unusual ability will be present. These lectures 
will be free to members of the Summer Session. 



CONFERENCES 

In addition to the work under 
' ' Methods ' ' in the program of the 
general course in Agriculture, other 
conferences will be called from time to 
time to meet the needs that arise and 
in accordance with the wishes of the 
members. A large degree of democ- 
racy will be observed in planning this 
work the active cooperation of the 
students being solicited in bringing 
forward for consideration topics that 
Campus Vikw th ^ tllink m0St needful - 

RURAL LIFE WEEK 

June 24 to 30 Inclusive 

The rural problem has ceased to be an individual problem and is now 
a great sociological problem. As such it is of deep interest to all who are 
concerned with public welfare. 

During the second week of the Summer School special conferences will 
be held upon Rural Life. Prominent men and women interested in this 
work will give lectures and many conferences will be held. There will be 
two regular courses of lectures offered. Dr. Hibbard will offer a course 
of six lectures on Rural Sociology in its general aspects and Dr. Warren 
H. Wilson will offer a course of six upon Rural Conditions in relation to 
religious life. 

Dr. Hibbard is Head of the Department of Economics and Civics at 
Auks and has given special attention to those conditions affecting the rural 
lif<- of America and particularly of Iowa. 

Dr. Hibbard was called into the service of the government for special 
expert work for a year in connection with the last Federal Census and will 
give ns the benefit of that experience. 

Dr. Wilson is Superintendent of the Department of Church and Coun- 
try Life of the United States Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church, and Iowa is fortunate in procuring his services for this important 
conned ion. 

Rev. W. B. McNutt formerly Pastor at Plainfield, Illinois, will also be 



with us. Those who heard him last year here, can bear testimony to the 
worth of his message. 

We also hope to have with us to assist in this work Rev. Richmond A. 
Smith, who was with us last year and who now has charge of the field work 
in this State for the Baptist Church. Other ministers and Y. M. C. A. work- 
ers who have had actual experience in the rural field will be present. 

In addition to the regular Courses of lectures there will be daily con- 
ferences and several evening lectures. On Sunday, June 30, there will be 
special Church Services with a sermon on some phase of the rural situation. 

As the lectures and conferences will not occupy the entire day, all are 
urged to take advantage of the spare time to take work in the classes in 
Agriculture and Home Economics in operation at the time. Ministers and 
other christian workers will find the Agricultural work offered in Courses 




The Farm House, A Landmark Erected in 1865 

S. 1 and S. 2 described elsewhere in this pamphlet, to be extremely practical 
in giving them knowledge of Agriculture that will be helpful in their work. 

They are invited and urged to take the entire Course. 

The titles of Dr. Wilson 's lectures are as follows : 

Lecture (1) — "The Pioneer and the Household Farmer Types of Coun- 
try Church. ' ' 

Lecture (2) — "Farm Speculation, Retired Farmers, Renters and the 
Country Church. ' ' 

Lecture (3) — "Organized Husbandry and Organized Religion." 

Lecture (4)— "The Village the Goal of Country Life." 

Lecture (5) — "The Church and the Community. " 

Those interested should write Dean C. F. Curtiss, Ames, Iowa, for a 
special program. 



8 



EXCURSIONS, PICNICS, SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS 

Saturday forenoon, June 22, will he occupied by regular class work in 
the general courses. Students in these courses will be free on other Satur- 
days for study, special investigation of certain work and experiments or for 
excursions to the Dairy Farm, Poultry farm, Museums, Plant Breeding plots, 
Soils, Experimental Plots, Forestry Plots and others. Explanations will be 
made of problems being solved and the methods used. 




Along Squaw Creek 

Some of the College Credit Courses will include work on Saturday. 
This is sometimes made necessary by the number of hours required to com- 
plete the course. 

Parties can be organized at anytime by the students and faculty to en- 
joy basket picnics and suppers in the North woods, at Rookwood (Professor 
Curtiss' farm) or on the Campus. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICE 

The various denominations will have regular morning and evening ser- 
vices including Sunday School in their Churches in Ames. 

A special service for dune 30 will be provided. 

If desired arrangements will be made for some Conferences regarding 
Y. .M. C. A. work in public schools and rural communities. 

These conferences will be held as arranged in Alumni Hall and will be 
in Charge Of Rev. .1. I'. Clyde, Secretary of the College Y. M. C. A. 

REST AND STUDY ROOMS 
In tlie Hall of Agriculture, Dairy Building, Home Economics and 



Central Buildings where most of the classes will be held, rooms will be 
designed as rest and study rooms to which students may retire at any time 
during the day. 

LIBRARY 

The Agricultural Library in the Hall of Agriculture is supplied with 
the best books, bulletins, reports and agricultural papers and will be at the 
disposal of Summer school students both as a consulting and reading room. 



*i^ -rr* 




A Campus Walk 

The general college library in Morrill Hall will also be open for Sum- 
mer school students. 

CERTIFICATES 

The Registrar will furnish certificates to those who complete any course 
or courses, when requested to do so. 

PRIVATE CONSULTATION 

Opportunity will be offered for conferences with members of the college 
faculty on topics of special interest to individual students. 

SPORTS AND GAMES 

The college baseball grounds and tennis courts will be available for use 
of the Summer School students. Those having their own equipments for 



10 

those games should come prepared to play. It may be possible to organize 
teams in other games. 

FEES 

The enrollment fee for all members of the Summer Session will be $5.00 
for the six weeks. There will be no laboratory fees for the General Course 
in Agriculture. 

There will be a fee of $3.00 in the General Course in Home Economics 
to partially cover the cost of materials furnished, with a pro rata arrange- 
ment for any not taking the full course. The fees for the various college 
credit courses will be the same as for the College year and are shown in the 
descriptions of the courses. 

ROOMS AND BOARD 

Alumni Hall will accommodate a few roomers. A number of Fraternity, 
Sorority and Club houses will be available, some of them for rooms only 
and some for both rooms and meals. The College cafe in Alumni Hall will 
furnish meals to all regular boarders at $4.50 per week the same rate charged 
our college students throughout the year. A list of approved rooming and 
boarding houses is being prepared and students will be directed to these on 
arrival and every assistance rendered in procuring satisfactory locations. 
Some places can probably be offered for less than $4.50 per week, but it is 
well to be comfortably situated that you may get the largest returns from 
the Summer school session. 

ALUMNI HALL 

Alumni Hall, the home of the Young Men's and Young Women's 
Christian Associations, will be open at all times for the use of the Summer 
School students. Its reading rooms, game rooms, parlors and assembly 
rooms are always open and you are heartily welcome to frequent them at 
your pleasure. The use of the large swimming pool and shower baths may 
be had during the entire term on the payment of one dollar. The pool will 
be kept in perfect sanitary condition, and will be a source of delightful rec- 
reation during the warm weather. A schedule of houis will be arranged 
for the use of these baths by men and women. 

LOCATION 

Auks is almost at the geographical center of the State of Iowa on the 
main lino of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad. It is about thirty-five 
miles north of Dos Moines with which it is connected by a branch line of 
the Chicago & Northwestern railroad and by the Fort Dodge, Des Moines 
and Southern (interurban) running from Port Dodge and Rockwell City to 
Des Moines. A branch of 1 ho Chicago & Northwestern from Ames pene- 
trans i he northern pari of the State. Ames is proverbially a clean town, 
saloons ami billiard hulls being unheard of. 

The College is over a mile out bu1 is coi cted by ; lectric car Line 

with frequent service. 

Th<- College I ampus is siid by those who have traveled much to be the 



11 

most beautiful one in the United States. A gentleman, himself a college 
president who had visited all of the great colleges in America and many in 
Europe, said its buildings and Campus were unequalled. June is one of the 
best months in the year to enjoy its tranquil splendors. 

STATE ASSOCIATION OF INDUSTRIAL TEACHERS 

During the Summer Session there will be formed one or more State 
Associations of those concerned in teaching the Industrial Subjects. Come 
with some ideas of the best plans, especially as to whether there should be 
separate organizations of the teachers of Agriculture, Home Economics, 
and Manual Training or whether there should be one organization to include 
all. 

STATE AIDED HIGH SCHOOLS 

For many years educators have longed for State aid to high schools 
that would perform some distinct service to the cause of education. The 
last legislature was very generous and granted $500 annually to those main- 
taining . suitable courses for the preparation of rural teachers specifying 
that such courses must contain work in Agriculture and Home Economics. 
The coming year will see ninety such high schools in Iowa. To supply these 
schools with teachers who have had full four year college courses in Agri- 
culture and Home Economics is an educational and economical impossibility 
though a neighboring state is rapidly doing so. 

To meet the Iowa situation it will be necessary to take teachers who 
were farm reared and have since had a Normal school or college education 
which included good courses in the general sciences and then prepare them 
as rapidly as possible in Scientific Agriculture. If this is not done the 
Agriculture in Iowa high schools will degenerate into the teaching of a book 
on agriculture which brings ill repute upon the high school, the teacher, the 
subject and the law and if continued will probably result in the withdrawal 
of the State aid; for the public is thoroughly aroused to the desirability 
of having this taught in a practical manner. The legislature has done its 
part. It now remains for the teachers to do theirs. To enable them to do 
so this institution stands ready to aid in every way possible. 

The General Course (SI) has been arranged purposely to meet this 
need and all who are to teach Agriculture in Iowa high schools next year 
are urged to take advantage of it. Every other aid in addition to the reg- 
ular course that can be given to such teachers will be offered freely. Texts, 
Methods, Apparatus, Courses of study, libraries, field work, experiments, 
etc., will be discussed. 

MEN WANTED 

The demand for farm reared men of normal school or college training 
or both and with a full course in Agriculture is immeasurably beyond the 
supply at salaries as high as $3,000. 

The department of Agricultural Education of this college has had calls 
for such men since January 1st, 1912, to fill positions in the normal schools 
of nine states and has had no suitable men to recommend. Several State 



12 

Agricultural Colleges are still looking for such men to take positions in 
Extension Departments or in Professional Departments of the College. No 
suitable men are now available. Several Iowa School men are planning to 
take summer college work until nearly through and then take a continuous 
year and be ready for some of these good positions. More should do so 
for it will take some years to supply the demand and the demand will 
increase. 

The Department of Agricultural Education was established at Ames 
one year ago to offer a suitable course for such men. Catalog will be sent 
you on request. 

The graduates from the other regular four year courses of agriculture 
who desire to teach are all being located for next year to teach in high 
schools at from $1,200 up and most of these men have never taught. One 
Ames graduate has been teaching agriculture in Minnesota high school the 
past three years at $1,400, $1,800 and $2,000 respectively and next year 
his salary will be $2,500. We shall give you the benefit of his experience 
during the summer school. 

Bequests come to us from nearly every state in the Union from Porto 
Eico, the Philippines and elsewhere to furnish men and we can in no meas- 
ure supply the demand. If you are a successful teacher and desire to enter 
that field we shall be glad to aid you. Teaching Agriculture does not unfit 
a man for business but prepares him even better for farming for himself, 
managing a large farm or ranch, or for entering the field of Commercial 
Agriculture such as Machinery, Drainage, Irrigation or development work 
with large corporations. The dead line of age retirement recedes a long 
distance when one's educational career touches elbows with the business 
world. 



UNIVERSITY Or ILUNUd 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Edgar Williams Stanton Acting President 

Ashley Van Storm Director 

PROFESSORS 

Robert Earle Buchanan Bacteriology 

Orange Howard Cessna Chaplain, Psychology 

Benjamin Horace Hibbard Economics 

Harold De Mott Hughes Farm Crops 

Willard John Kennedy Animal Husbandry 

Catherine J. MacKay Home Economics 

Martin Mortensen Dairy 

Alvin Buell Noble English 

William Henry Stevenson Soils 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Clare Newton Arnett Animal Husbandry 

Winfred Forrest Coover Chemistry 

Arthur Thomas Erwin Horticulture 

Henry Herbert Kildee Animal Husbandry 

William Harper Pew Animal Husbandry 

Lola A. Placeway Chemistry 

Walter Henry Cooper Dairy 

Jules Cool Cunningham Botany 

Chester 0. Fowler Chemistry 

Claude Kedzie Shedd Agricultural Engineering 

Roy Eugene Smith Soils 

INSTRUCTORS 

William Ray Heckler Farm Crops 

Frank N. Marcellus Poultry 

Ruth Michaels Home Economics 

Agnes Gina Mosher Mathematics 

ASSISTANTS 
Iva L. Brant Home Economics 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Alexander Stewart Thompson. . . .Voice, Piano, Sight Singing and Harmony 

Clara Dutton Thompson Voice 

Cassandra Wallace Violin 



14 

SPECIAL LECTURERS 

Edward Charles Bishop, Ames, Iowa Methods 

Schools Extension Iowa State College, (ex-State Superintendent, Nebraska) 

Fred L. Mahannah, Des Moines, Iowa Methods 

State High School Inspector, State Department of Public Instruction 

P. E. McClenahan, Des Moines, Iowa Methods 

State High School Inspector, State Board of Education 

Theodore Sexauer, Albert Lea, Minnesota Methods 

Director of Agriculture, Putnam State High School, Albert Lea, Minn. 

Rev. Warren II. Wilson, New York City Eural Life 

Superintendent Department of Church and Country Life, U. S. Board of 
Presbyterian Church 

Rev. W. B. McNutt, Plainfield, Illinois Rural Life 

Assistant to Dr. Warren H. Wilson 

Rev. Richmond A. Smith, Cedar Falls, Iowa Rural Life 

Secretary Rural Church Work, Iowa Baptist State Convention 

Rev. C. L. Baxter, Council Bluffs, Towa Rural Life 

District Superintendent Council Bluffs District, Methodist Episcopal Church 

A. P. Laughlin, Peoria, Illinois Manual Training 

Supervisor of Manual Training in the Public Schools of Peoria 



COURSES 



There will be two Kinds of Courses offered : Those of a general nature 
for which no college credit is given and others consisting of regular college 
courses for which college credit is given. Full explanation is given of each 
below : 

GENERAL COURSES 

Course S 1. Agriculture. This is a general course in Agriculture 
which is planned to give the elements of each part of the subject during the 
six weeks. It is primarily intended for those who have prepared them- 
selves for teaching other branches but who, owing to the introduction of 
agriculture in the schools, now wish to prepare to teach that also. The 
work is carefully planned to cover the ground of the general texts in agri- 
culture in use in this and near-by states. This work wdll be given by the 
regular college faculty and in the same scientific manner used in the regular 
courses using laboratory and field work where practicable. 

A special feature of this course is a series of lessons on the pedagogy 
and administration of the work in public schools by those who from exper- 
ience are able to give valuable instruction. For this we have engaged such 
men as P. E. McClenahan, State Inspector of High Schools under the State 
Board of Education, Fred L. Mahannah, Inspector of State Aid High 
Schools, E. C. Bishop, formerly County and State Superintendent in Ne- 
braska, now in charge of Public School Agricultural Extension work in this 
college, and Theodore Sexauer, an Ames graduate and a leader in the re- 
markable work being done in Agriculture in the high schools of Minnesota. 
We also expect the services of other men equally capable. Opportunity 
will be given for conferences regarding the solution of practical problems 
connected with the introduction of Agriculture and Home Economics in the 
schools. 

The course is planned to occupy six hours a day of the student's time 
for the entire six weeks. This includes the time spent in laboratories. 
The following has been arranged as a 

TENTATIVE PROGRAM: GENERAL COURSE 

showing subjects, rooms, and hours of beginning recitations for each w T eek. 

Subject to change in arrangement. 

A.=Hall of Agriculture. D.=Dairy Building. 



Hrs. Begin 


8 | 9 


1 10 I 11 


1 | 2 


3 


1st week 


Plant Propagation 
(208A) & Hort. Lab 


1 Methods 
! (117A) 


Soils and Fertility 

(6A) 


Methods 

(117A) 


2nd week 


Farm Crops 
(East Pavilion) 


1 Methods 

1 (117A) 


Soils and Fertility 

(6A) 


Methods 

(117A) 


3rd week 


Farm Crops 
(East Pavilion") 


Orchard & Garden 
(208A. & Hort. Lab.) 


Soils and Fertility 
(6A) 


Dairying 
(11D) 


4th week 


Farm Crops 
(East Pavilion) 


Orchard & Garden 
(208A & Hort. Lab ) 


Stock Judging 
(Upper Pavilion) 


Dairying 
(11D) 


5th week 


Weeds, Plant Dis- 
eases (208A) 


Poultry 1 Methods 
(117A) 1 (117A) 


Stock Judging 
(Upper Pavilion) 


Methods 

(117A) 


6th week 


(To be 
chosen 
by class) 


Feeds & 
Feeding 

(117A) 


Poultry 

(117A) 


Methods 
(117A) 


Stock Judging 
(Upper Pavilion) 


Methods 

(117A) 



16 



For a full description of the work to be taken in this course see the 
outlines below : 

FARM CROPS 



The course in farm crops will be ar- 
ranged so that the teacher will receive 
much of the same work that the pupils 
will be expected to get under his di- 
rection later. This is done in order 
that the teacher may have a direct 
knowledge of what he is teaching. 

Studies will be made in the class- 
room, field, laboratory and the exper- 
imental plots, of corn, wheat, oats, 
barley, rye and legumes. This study 
will include the selection, storing, test- 
ing of the seed, the cultivation of the 
soil to get the highest yields of each 
of the crops, the field botany of each 
of the cereals, and current practices 
peculiar to the crops under consider- 
ation. 

In connection with these studies di- 
rections will be given in regard to 
methods to employ in presenting such 
subjects to the school pupils. Exam- 
ples of work done will be shown, and 
the leading references which would be 
profitable for use in the school room 
will be used. 

SOILS 

The work in soils will direct the at- 
tention of the student to some inter- 
esting and fundamental facts regard- 
ing the relation of soils to air, moist- 
ure and heat; the way in which soils 
supply growing plants with food ma- 
terials, the nature of plant food, and 
tlic influence of bacteria and legumes on soil fertility. The work will be 
given principally by means of demonstrations and only such apparatus will 
be used as can be easily obtained by any school, and almost without cost. 
The necessity of h proper amount of air, heat, light, and moisture; factors 
influencing the air and water holding capacity of various soils, the move- 
ment of water through soils, the water removed by tile drains, methods 
whereby Boil moisture may be conserved, and the influence of plant food on 
various crops, are some of the many things which will be demonstrated. 




17 



METHODS 

Agriculture, the newest of public school sciences, opens to the teacher a 
new field of interesting and valuable work. It includes the home economic 
and educational phases of the other applied sciences. The organization of 
agricultural knowledge, the placing of agriculture in a form as definite as 
that of the older sciences, and the application of established pedagogic prin- 
ciples to its teaching is one of the live problems of today. 

The course in methods will deal with the principles and practice of 
methods especially as applied in the teaching of Agriculture, Home Econ- 
omics and Manual Training. The work will be adapted to the needs of the 
teacher, the supervisor and the school administrator. Round table discus- 
sions will offer opportunity for the consideration of any related subjects. 
The following topics will be included: 

1. Courses of study in agriculture in high schools, grades and rural 
schools. 2. The readjustment of elementary science teaching to agricul- 
ture. 3. Organized correlation of agricultural topics. 4. The recogni- 
tion and development of pedagogic values in the teaching of agriculture. 
5. Uses of the text. 6. The economic, cultural and local interest phases. 
7. Agriculture as a basic elementary high school science. 8. Agriculture 
as a vocational, cultural ard economic subject, and as an earth science. 9. 
Extension work. 10. Illustrated booklet woik, collections of seeds, weeds, 
plants and other laboratory materials. 11. Field work and experimental 
plots. 12. The agriculture of physics, chemistry, physical, commercial and 
industrial geography, botany, zoology, economics, nature study and 
psychology. 13. Judging work in J arm crops and farm animals. 14. 
Teachers' helps, how to secure and use them. 




Stock Jidgin;; — Prize Winning College Animw.s 



18 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Eecognizing the importance of familiarizing our teachers with Iowa's 
most important industry, that of live stock, the department will offer a 
series of lectures and demonstrations covering the feeding, study of breed 
characteristics and the judging of domestic animals. Great care has been 
observed in the outlining of the work so as to make it useful in the fullest 
measure to our teachers. The teacher will not only receive instruction in 
the way of furnishing information, but also be given helpful suggestions 
as to best methods of outlining and teaching this work. This is a line of 
work which can be made intensely interesting to every boy and girl in our 
school work. 

The college equipment for Animal Husbandry work is second to that 
of no other institution in the world. The college cattle, horses, hogs and 
sheep and many of them prize winners from the great shows of America 
will be used in the class room for study. The oldest and most experienced 
instructors will present this work. 

FEEDS AND FEEDING 

The lectures given on the subject of feeding farm live stock Avill be so 
arranged as to cover the principles involved in the growth, feed and care of 
cattle, swine, sheep and horses. All of the lectures will be in close con- 
nection with the laboratory work given in the other Animal Husbandly 
Courses. 

PLANT PROPAGATION 

A study of plant reproduction both sexually and non-sexually. Seeds, 
storage, testing, germination, cuttage, graftage, and budding, including 
simple laboratory exercises. 

ORCHARD AND GARDEN 

The development and care of 
the orchard and garden includ- 
ing cultural methods, varieties 
for the Iowa planter, insect 
and fungous pests, and meth- 
ods of control. Planning and 
planting of the home and school 
grounds. 

\ IRCIS8I s 

WEEDS AND PLANT DISEASES 
work will be given under two general heads: First 

WEEDS 

One of the most important problems confronting the Iowa farmer is 

the question of weeds. The annua] loss to the farmer runs into the millions 

of dollars. This can Largely be prevented it' the farmers have a belter 

understanding of weeds and their kinds. The teachers of the state can do 




19 



a great' deal to bring knowledge to the farmers in their respective com- 
munities. 

The course in weeds will consist of lectures, and practical work in the 
identification of the common weeds of Iowa, also the methods used in ex- 
terminating them, how weeds are scattered through the purchase of seeds, 
farm implements, animals, water, and other agencies. Practical work in the 
field as well as the laboratory will be combined with the lecture work. 

The second division of the work will be 

PLANT DISEASES 

Fungous pests of economic importance will be studied as follows: Classi- 
fication briefly; means of identification; stages, both summer and winter; 
life history in relation to temperature, moisture, sunlight, chemicals, insects, 
etc. Simple laboratory exercises will be given which may be repeated in 
the schools without expensive equipment. 




Rouge II of the Brick Field World's Champion Channel 
Bred Two-Year Old Guernsey Heifer (Owned by College) 

FARM DAIRY WORK 

This course is outlined with the object in view of giving the public 
school teachers such information as will be of value as well as interest to 
them. The lectures will cover such subjects as secretion and composition of 
milk; the value of milk for fat, acid and adulteration; ice cream making 
on the farm, testing cows on the farm and farm butter making, etc. Work 
in the laboratory will be given in milk testing and ice cream making. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

The work in poultry will include those features which are best adapted 
to use in public schools. The general principles of feeding, breeding, hous- 
ing, incubating and rearing will be taken up during the first week of the 
session. 



20 

The exercises covered will be such as are treated of in general Agricul- 
tural texts, for example, studies of ' ' Types of feathers and feather mark- 
ings, " " Breed characteristics, ' ' " Plan of a Poultry house, ' ' ' ' Poultry 
house appliances, " " Study of Incubators and Brooder construction, " " The 
Anatomy of the Egg, ' ' ' ' Embryology of the chick. ' ' 

Course S 2. This is a general course for farmers and business and 
professional men and women who wish to get a general knowledge of the 
fundamentals of agriculture from the combined scientific and practical 
points of view. The course will be practically the same as Course S 1, 
excepting the work in Methods for which other practical work may be 
substituted. 

Course S 3. Homemakers' Course covers a general outline in cook- 
ing and sewing, which is especially adapted for application in the home. 
The cooking will include lectures and laboratory work in food preparation, 
serving of meals, home nursing and invalid cooking. Sewing will cover 
discussions of materials and uses of same. The practical work will be the 
cutting, fitting and finishing of garments. A definite course is planned and 
it is desired that all students enter with the idea of completing the de- 
scribed work. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

Course S 10. This work will have for its general object the preparation 
of teachers for manual training as taught in the best public schools. Three 
lines of work will be taken up, namely: shop instruction, mechanical draw- 
ing, and general lectures on the history and organization of manual training 
departments, and on methods of giving manual training instruction. 

In the shop work, the use and care of tools, working from blue prints, 
value and availability of materials, finishing, and similar topics will be con- 
sidered. Sets of exercises will be presented, and, so far as time permits, 
will be made by the students. 

The instruction in mechanical drawing will be co-ordinated to that in the 
shop work, and the object will be to fit teachers for giving instruction in 
mechanical drawing in the public schools of the State. The drawing work 
will be especially adapted to the needs of teachers whose pupils are of public 
school age. 

In the lecture work the educational and practical value of manual 
training work will be considered, and suggestions given for equipping and 
organizing manual training departments, and for arranging the work sys- 
tematically in the best manner for securing satisfactory results in the public 
schools. 

The work will be of especial value, First: To public school teachers who 
wish to prepare themselves for manual training, and Second: To students 
who have already taken lip sonic shop work and technical drawing, and who 
wish if) obtain the additional preparation needed to make their knowledge 
available in teaching manual training under the conditions found in the 
public schools. 

Mr. A. I'. Laughlin, Supervisor of Manual Training for the Public 
Schools of Peoria, Illinois, will have charge of this work. Mr. Laughlin has 



21 



the degree of A. B. from Oberlin College and M. S. from Ohio Wesleyan 
University and has taken special work in Bradly Polytechnic Institute, Peoria, 
Cornell University, N. Y., Lewis Institute, and Art Institute, Chicago. His 
teaching experience covers works in the Janesville, Wisconsin, High School; 
six years in Lyons Township High School, Cook County, Illinois; two years 
in Moorehead State Normal School, Minnesota; and several years as Super- 
visor of the Manual Training in Peoria; besides Normal classes at Lewis 
Institute and Chicago Commons. Mr. Laughlin is a frequent contributor to 
manual training literature and is distinctly a leader in his profession. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 



There are many who wish to take 
some of the regular College Courses 
either because of the intrinsic value of 
the work to them in a practical way 
or as a part of a regular College 
Course to be completed later. 



Ilm 



Shamrock, Who Won Grand International 
Championship for the College 



The courses described below are 
the same as those offered during the 
College year and will be taught by 
the regular college faculty. The de- 
scriptions are quoted from the regular 
College Catalog (copy of which will be sent on request). 

As the summer session is approximately one-third the length of a college 
semester the number of hours per week devoted to a course in the Summer 
Session will be three times what is shown in these descriptions below. About 
eigteen hours per week constitutes full work in these college courses. 

Classes will be conducted in each of these Courses if sufficient members 
register to warrant. 




Sewing Laboratory 



22 

Requests already received indicate strongly that the courses marked * 
will be sure of sufficient enrollment. Which of the others will be offered 
will depend upon the early registrations. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

*I. Market Types of Cattle and Sheep. Includes the judging of 
different market classes of beef cattle, and sheep, both mutton and wool. 
Credit, two hours. Three hours' laboratory and one hour lecture per week. 
Fee, $2.00. 

2. Market Types of Dairy Cattle ,Horses and Swine. Includes 
judging different market classes of dairy cattle, light and heavy horses, 
and swine (bacon and fat). Three hours' laboratory and one hour lecture 
per week. Two hours ' credit. Fee, $2.00. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

*5. Farm Machinery and Farm Motors. Mechanics and materials; 
the measurement and transmission of power; development, construction, 
functions and methods of operating, adjusting and repairing farm machinery 
and farm motors; also the principles of draft and the production of power. 
Laboratory w 7 ork is devoted to the study of construction, operation, adjust- 
ment and testing the machines discussed in the class room. Two and two- 
thirds hours' credit. Recitations, two hours, and laboratory, two hours. 
Fee, $2.00. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

*17. General Bacteriology and Fermentations for Students in 
Home Economics. Bacteria in their relations to the home, including a 
brief consideration of the pathogenic forms and the bacteria, yeasts and 
molds in their zymotic activities. Three and one-third hours' credit. Two 
lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods. Fee, $5.00. 

BOTANY 

60. Botany of Weeds. Injury to farm, garden and horticultural 
crops, and the origin and distribution of weeds. Lecture, one hour, labora- 
tory, two hours. One and two-thirds hours' credit. Fee, $3.00. 

09. Seeds and Seed Testing. Same as course 14. Lecture, one hour, 
laboratory, two hours. One and two-thirds hours' credit. 

CHEMISTRY 

■ - 1 • General Chemistry. Introductory work. Study of non-metallic 
elements present in air and soil. Recitations review the work of the 
laboratory. four and one-third hours' credit. Eecitations, three hours, 
and laboratory two periods per week. Deposit, $5.00. 

*23. Qualitative Analysis. Continuation of course 21. Study of the 

metallic or base forming elements, their relation to non metallic or the acid 

forming elements, and their place in formation of salts; the separation and 

uiion of these elements and their compounds preparatory to determin- 



23 

ing them quantitatively. Four and one-third hours' credit. Recitation, three 
hours, and laboratory two periods, per week. Deposit, $5.00. 

*25. Organic Chemistry. Elementary principles of organic chem- 
istry. Lectures and recitations. Followed by a study of the chemical 
changes which occur during digestion, assimilation and metabolism. Labo- 
ratory work includes the preparation of a limited number of organic com- 
pounds and a study of the carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Prerequisite, 
course 23. Recitations, three hours, and laboratory, one period, per week. 
Three and two-thirds hours' credit. Deposit, $5.00. 

ECONOMICS 

*10. Agricultural Economics. Historical and comparative agricul- 
tural systems; land tenure; size of farms; co-operation; taxation; prices; 
transportation; marketing; land credit; the relation of the state to agri- 
culture. Prerequisite, 1 or 9. Three hours' credit. 

ENGLISH 

*10. Narration and Description. Study and practice in these forms 
of discourse, following the same general method as in Course 11. Pre- 
requisite, English 11. Three hours' credit. Fee, $.25. 

FARM CROPS 

. 1. Corn Growing and Judging. The corn plant, methods of select- 



y> Farm Dairying. Secretion, composition, testing, sep- 
aration and acidity of milk, preparation of starters , "pemng jof 
Learn, and earning and packing batter. Two ™**™^ 
hoars' credit. Recitation, two hoars, and laboratory, two 

*"" ^Sfte.25 SdMUM Inspection. Babcock test, Far- 
vino-ton's and Manns' test for determining acidity sampling, 
d te sting of individual cows, and detection of different 
prLrva ti£* and adnlterations. One and two-tmrds hoars 
credit. Recitation, one hoar, and laboratory, two hours per 
week. Fee, |2.50. 

crearc. Jttecitations, two hours, and laboratory, two hours per week. 
Fee, $1.50. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

*1. Sewing. Drafting of patterns and hand sewing, including stitches, 
darning, patching, the making of button holes, etc., all of which will be 
applied to some useful garment. One recitation, two 2-hour laboratories. 
Two and one-third hours' credit. Fee, $1.00. 



22 

Requests already received indicate strongly that the courses marked * 
will be sure of sufficient enrollment. Which of the others will be offered 
will depend upon the early registrations. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

*1. Market Types of Cattle and Sheep. Includes the judging of 
different market classes of beef cattle, and sheep, both mutton and wool. 
Credit, two hours. Three hours ' laboratory and one hour lecture per week. 
Fee, $2.00. 

2. Market Types of Dairy Cattle , Horses and Swine. Includes 
judging different market classes' of dairy cattle, light and heavy horses, 
and swine (bacon and fat). Three hours' laboratory and one hour lecture 
per week. Two hours \ credit. Fee, $2.00. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

*5. Farm Machinery and Farm Motors. Mechanics and materials; 
the measurement and transmission of power; development, construction, 
functions and methods of operating, adjusting and repairing farm machinery 
and farm motors; also the principles of draft and the production of power. 
Laboratory work is devoted to the study of construction, operation, adjust- 
ment and testing the machines discussed in the class room. Two and two- 
thirds hours' credit. Recitations, two hours, and laboratory, two hours. 
Fee. $2.00. 



RAPTRRTOLOGY 



*21. General Chemistry. Introductory work, siuay oi nou-uievamc 
elements present in air and soil. Recitations review the work of the 
laboratory. Pour and one-third Kours' credit. Recitations, three hours, 
and laboratory two periods per week. Deposit, $5.00. 

'-•'!■ Qualitative Analysis. Continuation of course 21. Study of the 
metallic or base forming elements, their relation to non-metallic or the acid 
forming elements, and their place in formation of salts; the separation and 
recognition of these elements and their compounds preparatory to determin 



23 

ing them quantitatively. Four and one-third hours' credit. Recitation, three 
hours, and laboratory two periods, per week. Deposit, $5.00. 

*25. Organic Chemistry. Elementary principles of organic chem- 
istry. Lectures and recitations. Followed by a study of the chemical 
changes which occur during digestion, assimilation and metabolism. Labo- 
ratory work includes the preparation of a limited number of organic com- 
pounds and a study of the carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Prerequisite, 
course 23. Recitations, three hours, and laboratory, one period, per week. 
Three and two-thirds hours' credit. Deposit, $5.00. 

ECONOMICS 

*10. Agricultural Economics. Historical and comparative agricul- 
tural systems; land tenure; size of farms; co-operation; taxation; prices; 
transportation; marketing; land credit; the relation of the state to agri- 
culture. Prerequisite, 1 or 9. Three hours ' credit. 

ENGLISH 

*10. Narration and Description. Study and practice in these forms 
of discourse, following the same general method as in Course 11. Pre- 
requisite, English 11. Three hours' credit. Fee, $.25. 

FARM CROPS 

. 1. Corn Growing and Judging. The corn plant, methods of select- 
ing, storing, testing, grading, planting, cultivating and harvesting. Cost 
of production, use of the crop, and commercial marketing are studied. 
Corn in the field with reference to per cent stand, barren stalks and suckers; 
leaf surface and correlation of the parts of the stalk. Each student is 
required to make his own plot, husk it, select the seed ears and hang them 
up for storage and shrinkage test. A detailed study is made of the 
structure of the cornstalk, ear, and kernel. The corn scoring and judging 
are taken up during the last part of the semester. Two and two-thirds 
hours ' credit. Recitations, two hours, and laboratory, two hours per week. 
Fee, $1.50. 

2. Small Grain. Oats, wheat (winter and spring), barley, rye, em- 
mer and spelz and macaroni wheat; their adaptation to soils and climate, 
preparation of seed bed, methods of seeding, botanical structure, problems 
of germination and plant growth; also score card practice and the prin- 
ciples of commercial grading in small grains. Two and two-thirds hours' 
credit. Recitations, two hours, and laboratory, two hours per week. 
Fee, $1.50. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

*1. Sewing. Drafting of patterns and hand sewing, including stitches, 
darning, patching, the making of button holes, etc., all of which will be 
applied to some useful garment. One recitation, two 2-hour laboratories. 
Two and one-third hours' credit. Fee, $1.00. 



25 

•41. Personal Sanitation and Hygiene. A lecture course upon the 
sanitary care of the person, clothing and surroundings, discussion of social 
and ethical questions which arise in community and college life. One 
hour's credit. 

HORTICULTURE 

38. Plant Propagation. Propagation of plants by sexual and non- 
sexual methods, germination, testing and storage of seeds, multiplication 
of plants by cuttage, layerage and graftage, including nursery methods and 
management. Recitations, two hours. Two hours ' credit. 

3. Orcharding. The establishment and care of home orchards and 
vineyards; systematic study of varieties adapted for planting in Iowa. 
Recitations, two hours, and laboratory, two hours, per week. Two and 
two-thirds hours' credit. Fee, $1.00. 

*8. Landscape Gardening. Planting and decoration of home grounds 
and parks; ornamental trees adapted to planting in Iowa. The ornamental 
trees and shrubs on the campus and in the department afford excellent 
material for laboratory work. Two lectures per week. Two hours ' credit. 

MATHEMATICS 

*17. Algebra and Trigonometry. The main object of this course 
is to so ground the student in the principles of trigonometry as to enable 
him to carry successfully his work in surveying, drainage and allied sub- 
jects. The course is intended to give the student sufficient knowledge of 
the subject to enable him to elect analytical geometry and calculus which 
are fundamental to certain lines of work in the agronomy course. The 
subjects investigated are definitions; positive and negative angles; circular 
measures of angles; operations upon angles; functions of angles, their 
relations and varying values; determination of values of the functions of 
particular angles; functions of different angles expressed in terms of 
those of a basal angle; derivation and reduction of trigonometric formulas; 
solution of right and oblique triangles. The points most strongly empha- 
sized are: Care in tracing the trigonometric functions of varying angles in 
the different quadrants, readiness and skill in the derivation and reduction 
of trigonometric formulas and accuracy in the use of logarithmic tables. 
Three hours' credit. 

A3. Algebra Review. This course, which covers all fundamental 
principles up to and including radicals and quadratics, takes the place of 
the review in algebra given in most high schools and corresponds to the 
review in algebra given in an increasing number of the best high schools 
of the state. 

The student is introduced to a quality of work demanding a broad 
view of principles and methods, and a marked degree of skill in algebraic 
manipulation. 

The course is intended primarily for students who, having taken ele- 
mentary algebra in the high school, need a thorough review before enter- 
ing advanced work , but it may be taken by students who show evidence 



26 

of a thorough knowledge of algebra through simple equations and at least 
a brief course through radicals. Keeitations, five hours per week. 

A5. Plane Geometry. Fundamental definitions and axioms, theorems 
relating to rectilinear figures and the circle, measurement of angles; doctrine 
of limits; theory of proportion; similar polygons; comparison and measure- 
ment of the surfaces of rectilinear figures; measurement of the circle, and 
geometrical construction of plane figures. The proofs outlined must be 
fully amplified; definitions must be stated with precision. 

POULTRY 

30. Breed Types of Poultry. Scoring and judging by comparison 
the more important varieties in accordance with the American Standard 
of Perfection. Two and two-thirds hours' credit. Lecture one hour and 
two 2-hour laboratories per week. Prerequisites, Courses 31 and 37. Fee, 
$2.00. 

31. Poultry Management. Poultry buildings, the arrangement of 
buildings and yards on the general farm, the planning of poultry farms, 
and feeds and feeding. Two hours' credit. Lectures two hours per week. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

*7. Descriptive Psychology. This course treats of the elements and 
outlines of psychology, and is designed as an introduction to the other 
courses in psychology and principles of education and child study. Standard 
texts are used such as those of Angell. James, Titchener, Thorndike, together 
with Seashore's Elementary Experiments in Psychology, supplemented by 
lectures, and illustrative experiments before the class. Three hours per week. 

8. Descriptive Psychology. This course is a continuation of Course 
7 which must precede it. Three hours per week. 

SOILS 

*1. Soil Physics. Origin, formation and classification of soils; soil 
moisture and methods of conserving it; the principles which underlie dry 
farming; soil temperature, and conditions influencing it; soil texture as 
affecting heat, moisture and plant food; surface tension, capillarity, osmosis, 
and diffusion as affecting soil conditions; the effect upon the soil and the 
crop of plowing, harrowing, cultivating, cropping, and rolling; washing of 
soils and methods of preventing the same; preparation of seed beds; culti- 
.ution and drainage :is affecting moisture, temperature, root development 
and the supply of available plant food. The work also comprises the deter- 
tninatioi] of the specific gravity, apparent specific gravity, volume weight, 
porosity, water holding capacity, and capillary power of various soils; also 
effect of mulches on the evaporation of water from the soil and the physical 
effects upon the soil of different systems of rotation and of continuous 
cropping. Prerequisite, Physics 205. Four hours' credit. Two lectures and 
two lecture and laboratory periods per week. Deposit, $4.00. 



27 

MUSIC 

Members of the Summer School and others desiring musical instruction 
will be offered courses in Voice, Piano, Violin, Sightsinging and Harmony. 
Private lessons will be given in Voice, Piano and Harmony, and class lessons 
in Sightsinging and Harmony. The regular Summer Course in music will con- 
sist of ' ' three lessons a week ' ' in either class or private lessons. These 
lessons are extra and not included in the regular college fee and must be 
arranged for with the director of the School of Music, to whom the fees are 
payable in advance. 

Any one desiring a lesser number of lessons than the regular Summer 
Course will pay a slightly higher rate, than the following prices: 

Three lessons a week in voice $18.00 for Summer Session. 

Three lessons a week in piano $18.00 for Summer Session. 

Class Lessons 

Three a week in sightsinging $4.00 for Summer Session. 

(ten in a class.) 

Class Lessons 

Three a week in harmony $6.00 for Summer Session. 

(five in class.) 

The practice pianos of the School of Musis will be at the disposal of 
students at the following rates: One hour a day for the six weeks or less, 
$1.50; two hours a day, $2.50; three hours a day, $3.50. 

These are the regular rates charged in this department during the 
college year. 

Address Alexander S. Thompson, 

Director School of Music. 

INFORMATION FOR THOSE WHO ATTEND 

How to Reach Ames. All passenger trains on the C. & N. W. Ry. 
east, west, north and south stop at Ames. Interurban cars of the Ft. Dodge 
and Des Moines Southern leave Eockwell City and Ft. Dodge about 7 o 'clock 
and Des Moines about 8 o'clock in the morning and every two hours there- 
after, arriving at Ames at two hour intervals from 10 A. M. till 8 P. M. 
These cars connect at Ft. Dodge with the 111. Central, the M. & St. L., the 
Rock Island and the Great Western; at Rockwell City with the 111. Central, 
C. M. & St. P.; at Des Moines with all the roads there and with other roads 
at various places. 

WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU ARRIVE 

If you arrive on the C. & N. W., go to street (Grand Ave.) at west end 
of depot park and take college car. Get off at farm station. If you arrive 
on the Interurban, get off at ll Campus. ' ' 

INFORMATION ROOM 

Go to Hall of Agriculture (Stone building at your left), call at room 
111, main floor. Here boarding places are assigned and information given 
regarding registration. 



28 



REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION 

All should reach here in time to register and classify Monday forenoon, 
June 17, as classes begin promptly at one o'clock on that day. Students 
will register and pay the enrollment fee at the office of the Registrar and 
Treasurer Central Building and then classify in the Hall of Agriculture. 
For further information address, 

A. V. Storm, Ames, Iowa, 

Director Summer Session. 



r : 




;5*j3ls 






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M3* 




A COOKING Laboratory 



29 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
AND MECHANIC ARTS 

AMES 

E. W. Stanton, Acting President. Herman Knapp, Registrar 

I. GRADUATE COURSES 

Agriculture 
Engineering 
General Science 

II. UNDERGRADUATE COURSES (Four Years) 

Based on fifteen units (30 credits) from an accredited high school. 

Division of Agriculture 

Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, 
Dairying, Horticulture and Forestry, Home Economics, 
Agricultural Education. 

Division of Veterinary Medicine 
D. V. M. Course. 

Division of Engineering 

Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engi- 
neering, Mining Engineering. (These four also have five 
year courses.) 
Ceramics. 

Division of Science 

B. S. Course in General Science. 

III. RESIDENT SHORT COURSES 

Agriculture (two years) 

Dairying (one year) 

Poultry Husbandry (one year) 

IV. SUMMER SESSION (six weeks) 

Agriculture, Home Economics and Allied subjects. 

V. WINTER SHORT COURSES 

Agricultural 

Corn and Small Grain Judging, Stock Judging, Farm Dairy- 
ing, Home Economics. 

VI. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

Investigation carried on under Federal and State laws. 

VII. ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

Investigations carried on under State law. 

VIII. GOOD ROADS INVESTIGATION 

Iowa Highway Commission located at College by State law. 

IX. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION WORK 

Short course, demonstration farms, lectures in various parts 
of state. Various agricultural subjects and Home Economics. 
Special workers for public schools. 




I 



31 



MAP OF COLLEGE GROUNDS— KEY 



1 Central Building 

2 Superintendent of Buildings, 

Office 

3 Eesidence of Dean Stanton 

4 Alumni Hall 

5 Chemical Hall 

6 Engineering Hall 

7 Engineering Annex 

8 Pattern Shop 

9 Foundry 

10 Power House 

11 Hydraulic Laboratory 

12 Machine Shop 

13 Forge Shop 

14 Training Shed 

15 West Gate Station 

16 Eesidence of Professor Holden 

17 Eesidence of Professor Beyer 

18 Eesidence of Dean Marston 

19 Eesidence 

20 College Hospital 

21 Post Office and Bookstore 

22 Morrill Hall 

23 Central Station 

24 Eesidence of Professor Beach 



25 Horticulture Barn 

26 Working Men's Cottage 

27 Margaret Hall 

28 Agricultural Engineering Hall 

29 Horticulture Laboratory 

30 Cattle Barn 

31 Farm Stable 

32 Upper Stock Judging Pavilion 

33 Experiment Station Barn 

34 Lower Stock Judging Pavilion 

35 Central Heating Plant 

36 Hall of Agriculture 

37 Eesidence of Dean Curtiss 

38 Dairy Building 

39 Sheep Barn 

40 Swine House 

41 Eesidence of Mrs. Barrett 

42 Eesidence of Professor Knapp 

43 Eesidence of Professor Cessna 

44 President 's Eesidence, ' ' The 

Knole ' ' 

45 Music Hall 

46 Veterinary Hospital 

53 Eesidence of Superintendent Sloss 




Portico Hall of Agriculture 



UNJVERS1TY Ofr JUJNCto 



vSummer Oession^ 
Iowa State College 



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which i*/are unavailable* 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 
OWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



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Jummer Oession^ 
Iowa State Colleqe 

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OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 
IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
AND MECHANIC ARTS 




COURSES OFFERED IN 1914 

1. For High School Teachers, Superintendents, and College 
Students the following college credit courses : 

Agriculture — (20 regular courses) 

Agricultural Engineering 3 courses 

Animal Husbandry 4 ' * 

Dairying 3 " 

Farm Crops 4 * ' 

Horticulture 2 

Poultry 2 

Soils 2 

Agricultural Economics 1 

Agricultural Education 4 

Bacteriology 3 " 

Botany 2 

Chemistry 6 " 

English 2 

History 1 

Home Economics 5 ' ' 

Manual Training 3 " 

Mathematics 1 * ' 

Physics 2 

Psychology 2 " 

Rural Sociology 1 " 

General courses in agriculture, manual training and home 
economics adapted for high school teachers. 

2. For Rural and Grade Teachers. A course offering in- 
struction in the industrial subjects, — agriculture, home eco- 
nomics and manual training. Enough work is provided in these 
subjects to occupy the full time of the student, but a part 
of his time may be spent in special classes in didactics, the 
common branches, and other first grade certificate subjects. 
Tuition in this course is free. 



BULLETIN 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

AND MECHANIC ARTS 

Vol. Xn MARCH 20, 1914 No. 31 



Summer Session 

General Announcement 

1914 



Ames, Iowa 



Published Tri-Monthly by the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Me- 
chanic Arts. Entered as Second-class Matter, ac the Post Office at Ames, 
Iowa, under tne Act of August 24, 1912. 



INFORMATION BLANK 

Giving Advanced Notice of Interest in the Summer Session. 

Students who are interested in the Summer Session may use the 
following form to help us, without entailing any obligation on their 
part. Check the items or fill in blanks, and mail to G. M. Wilson, 
Director of the Summer Session, Ames, Iowa. 



1. Date 



2. Name Address 

3. Check the lines of work in which you are interested: 

. . . .Agricultural Engineering Poultry 

. . . .Agricultural Economics * Psychology 

. . . .Agricultural Education *School Administration 



Animal Husbandry Soils 

Bacteriology General Course in Agricul- 

Botany ture 

Chemistry General Course in Home 

Dairying Economics 

♦English and Literature General Course in Manual 

Farm Crops Training 3 

♦History Rural and Grade Teachers 4 

Home Economics Course (free tuition) O 

Horticulture 

Manual Training 

* 



1 

Mathematics od 

Physics g 

♦These general courses are open only to those who are registered in 2 
one. or more of the other courses, or those who wish to take them for 
credit toward graduation at the Iowa State College. 

4. Do you expect to attend if you get the work you want? 

5. Do you want room in Margaret Hall (for women only)? 

6. Do you want camping space reserved for tent? 

7. Note names and addresses of others to whom you wish the 
Summer Session Bulletin sent. 

Name. Address. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

GENERAL INFORMATION . 5-11 

General Statement Residence requirements 

Who may attend Chapel 

Admission Students' mail 

Faculty Employment 

Courses and credits Social committee 

General courses Excursions 

Special work Recreation 

Fees Special lectures 

Board Model school 

Room Library 

Expenses Equipment 

Certificates Location 

Teachers' examinations Upon arrival 

Appointment committee Rural Life Conference 

LEGAL PROVISIONS 11-12 

State Aid to High Schools 11 

State Aid to Consolidated Schools 12 

Teaching Agriculture, Home Economics and Manual 

Training 12 

Twelve Weeks Normal Training 12 

Six Weeks Teacher Training 12 

OFFICERS AND FACULTY 13 

GENERAL COURSES 15-21 

Agriculture 15-18 

Home Economics 18-19 

Manual Training 19-20 

Rural and Grade Teachers' Course 20-21 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 22-28 

Agricultural Education History 

Agricultural Engineering Home Economics 

Animal Husbandry Horticulture 

Bacteriology Mathematics 

Botany Mechanical Engineering 

Chemistry Physics 

Dairying Poultry 

Economics Psychology 

English Soils 

Farm Crops 

MUSIC 28 

SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS 29 

SUGGESTIONS TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 32 



1914 SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR 

June 13, Saturday, 8 A. M. to 5 P. M. — Registration. 

June 15, Monday, 8 A. M. to 12 M. — Registration. 

1 to 5 P. M. — The schedule for the entire day will be given In 
half hour periods. 

June 16, Tuesday. — Regular work begins on regular schedule. 

June 22, Monday, 1 P. M. — Camp Fire Guardians, Boy Scout Mas- 
ters, Boys and Girls Club Leaders, Conference and Training 
School. Continues one week. 
4 P. M. — Opening of Rural Life Conference; continues two 
weeks. 

June 2 4, 25, 2 6, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. — Examination 
for state and county uniform certificates. 

June 29, 30, Monday and Tuesday. — Special Rural School Confer- 
erence. 

July 4, Saturday. — National Holiday. 

July 2 4, Friday, 4 P. M. — Summer Session closes. 

The college commencement exercises will occur during the week 

preceding the opening of the Summer Session, beginning with the 

baccalaureate sermon on June 7 and closing with the graduation 

exercises June 11. The date for the beginning of registration for 

the fall semester (1914) is September 11. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

General Statement. — Summer Session work was offered by the 
Iowa State College for the first time in 1911. In that summer a 
short course extending over two weeks was attended by about fifty 
superintendents and high school teachers of the state. Since that 
time the interest in agriculture and industrial subjects has in- 
creased tremendously, not only in this state, but throughout the 
United States. At the present time 19 states require the teaching 
of agriculture in the public schools, and in many more of the states 
agriculture is taught, especially in the high schools. In 1912 the 
Summer Session was extended to six weeks, and had a total enroll- 
ment of 128 students. The third Summer Session, last year, en- 
rolled 225 students. These students came from 63 counties of the 
state and 10 states of the Union. A large proportion of them were 
teachers in the public schools. Teachers x in service can be helped 
best through the Summer Session, and in a large measure, at least, 
they have a right to the advantages of the unusual equipment of the 
Iowa State College. This is especially true since the legislation 
requiring the teaching of the industrial subjects in the public school. 
No other institution in the middle west has a better selected faculty, 
or more adequate equipment than the Iowa State College. 

The distinctive feature of the Summer Session of 1914 is the 
organization of the Rural and Grade Teachers' Course on a basis of 
free tuition. 

The work will be considerably extended along other lines, new 
courses being offered in sufficient number to meet the demands of 
regular college students and to carry forward the work of teachers 
who have been attending previous Summer Sessions. 

Who May Properly Attend. On account of the easy conditions 
of entrance, many receive benefit from the Summer Session who do 
not attend during the regular year. The following should be par- 
ticularly interested in the Summer Session: 

1. All teachers, or persons expecting to teach next year, may use 
the Summer Session to secure work in the industrial subjects as 
required by the recent legislation. Teachers in the elementary 
schools will find profitable work in the Rural and Grade Teachers' 
Course. High school teachers may secure strong work along particu- 
lar lines as listed under college credit courses. 

2. Superintendents, Principals, and Supervisors. The large num- 
ber of superintendents and principals who have been enrolled in 
the Summer Session in the past indicates clearly that it is serving 
them to good advantage, and meeting a special need which they feel 
for getting acquainted with the newer subjects of manual training 
and agriculture, or of pursuing courses in agricultural education. 
An examination of the Iowa Directory indicates that agriculture is 
taught in the high schools of the state by the superintendents more 
often than by any other single group. Beginning and advanced 
courses are offered in the present session in soils, farm crops, animal 
husbandry, dairying, agricultural engineering, horticlture, and in 
the related subjects of rural sociology, agricultural economics, agri- 
cultural education, botany, bacteriology, etc. The Summer Session 



gives such superintendents and principals an opportunity to secure 
work of a high character under regular college instruction and un- 
der the most favorable conditions. 

3. County Superintendents are offered a special program dur- 
ing Rural Life week, but some are planning to be present for the 
entire six weeks. 

4. High School Graduates will find an opportunity to start the 
college course or to satisfy entrance requirements. High school 
graduates who think of entering the Iowa State College in the fall 
of 1914 may take advantage of the Summer Session to become 
acquainted with college methods and to secure work towards grad- 
uation. 

5. Regular Students in the Iowa State College may make up 
back work, shorten their course by doing advanced work or in- 
crease their electives. 

6. Students in other colleges who are interested in the industrial 
work and related lines will find other colleges willing to substitute 
credits made at this institution. 

7. Former Graduates may complete the necessary work in 
psychology and agricultural education in order to secure the first 
grade state certificate. 

8. Any Mature Individual who gives evidence of ability to carry 
the work with profit will be admitted without examination, but such 
individual must satisfy the department concerned as to his ability 
to carry the work. 

9. Rural and Village Ministers will find especially valuable help 
in the Rural Life Conference. Bankers, farmers, rural leaders, 
mothers and daughters will find a welcome, an atmosphere of cul- 
ture and inspiration, and practical help for their work. 

Conditions of Admission. All students who can profit by the in- 
struction offered will be admitted without examination. It is pre- 
sumed that all applying for admission have a serious purpose, and 
are interested in the industrial work. College credit will be granted, 
however, only to those who meet standard entrance requirements. 

Faculty. The Summer Session Faculty will consist of the mem- 
bers of the regular College Faculty, and also specialists from other 
institutions, who, through preparation and experience, are especial- 
ly prepared to render efficient service. 

Courses and Credits. A total of over fifty college credit courses 
is offered, twenty of these are in agriculture. An average student 
should be able to make from six to eight hours credit during a Sum- 
mer Session. All courses offered are completed during the Summer 
Session by increasing the number of recitations per week. There 
are no split courses. A student desiring to carry more than eight 
hours of college credit work will be required to make application 
for permission to take extra work, application being countersigned 
by all instructors involved. 

General Courses. In the general courses students will be given 
more freedom as to the number of hours to be carried, with this 
proviso, that in case they desire certificates under the new legisla- 
tion requiring twelve weeks of professional training, or increased 
wages because of attending a Summer Session for six weeks, they 
will be limited in the amount of work that can be carried according 
to the regulations sent out by the State Board of Examiners. (See 
legal requirements, p. 11). 

Special Work. Students wishing to do advanced or other special 
work not announced in this bulletin should communicate at an early 
date with the Director of the Summer Session, or with the professor 



in whose department they wish to work. Consideration may be 
given to a sufficient number of requests. 

Fees. The single Summer Session fee of $5.00 covers work in all 
courses with the exceptions of the Music Department. The fee for 
less than the full time is $1.00 a week, with $2.00 as a minimum. 
Any laboratory fees are indicated in connection with the descriptions 
of the courses. In the Rural and Grade Teachers' Course tuition is 
free. No fee is charged for attendance at the Rural Life Conference. 

Board. Women rooming in Margaret Hall will be furnished board 
at not to exceed $4.00 a week. This will be reduced if the Hall is 
tilled. The cafe in Alumni Hall will be open during the entire 
Summer Session. Board may be obtained at a number of boarding 
houses near the campus at rates which ordinarily prevail through- 
out Iowa. Last summer a number of the boarding houses offered 
board and room combined at $5.00 a week. 

Rooms. Women will be accommodated in Margaret Hall to the 
capacity of the Hall. Advanced reservation should be made by 
writing to the Director of Summer Session. Early reservation is 
advised. 

Rooms in private homes and rooming houses about the campus 
will be available, and in charge of a competent committee. Mr. J. P. 
Clyde, Secretary of the Y. M. C. A., has agreed to take over this 
work for the coming Summer Session, and give it the same thorough 
attention which it receives during the regular college year. Prices 
for private rooms for the Summer Session range from $1.00 to 
$1.50 per week for each occupant. Usually this means two in a 
room. 

Expenses. Expenses will vary with the individual, but need not 
exceed $40 or $45, in addition to car fare. This makes provision 
for tuition, $5.00; room and board for six weeks, $30.00; books and 
laundry, $5.00, and other incidentals. 

Certificates. Students satisfactorily completing any of the general 
courses offered in the six weeks' Summer Session will, upon request, 
be given a certificate showing attendance and grades. Most teachers 
will desire that attendance count toward the satisfaction of the 
recent law requiring twelve weeks of professional training, or the 
law giving certain credits for attendance at a six weeks' Summer 
Session. Such teachers will be fully advised as to the law, and 
certificate will be furnished accordingly. 

The Rural and Grade Teachers' Course is so arranged that it 
may be pursued with profit for four successive Summer Sessions. 
At the completion of the course special certificate may be given. 
Statement as to college credit work may be secured by application 
to the Registrar. 

Teachers' Examination. The examination for county uniform cer- 
tificates will be held at the College in June for the benefit of stu- 
dents who may desire to take it. Before leaving home a student 
intending to take this examination should pay the fee to the county 
superintendent and secure a certificate admitting to the examina- 
tion. 

The Appointment Committee. In order to better serve the 
schools of the state, the faculty has provided a regular Appoint- 
ment Committee, the duties of which are to assist the students of the 
College who desire to enter educational work in finding the positions 
for which they are best fitted, and to aid school officials in finding 
the teachers, principals, supervisors and superintendents best pre- 
pared for the positions to be filled. Students of the Summer Session 
who intend to teach or wish to better their positions, are invited 



8 

to register with this committee. Blanks which are provided for 
that purpose may be secured by calling at the office of the Director 
of the Summer Session, room 318 Agricultural Hall. No fee is 
charged for the services of this committee. 

Meeting Residence Requirements for a Degree Through Summer 
Session Work. Because of the largely increased attendance at the 
Summer Session, provision has been made for the satisfying of resi- 
dence requirements for a degree on the basis of four Summer Ses- 
sions equalling one full academic year in residence. This will en- 
able graduate students to complete the work for the Master's de- 
gree by attending four consecutive Summer Sessions. It is possible 
that the amount of work required for the degree may have to be 
supplemented by work in absence, or by correspondence, but any 
earnest student should be able to complete the work for a Master's 
degree in four successive Summer Sessions by doing some outside 
work. 

Chapel. Chapel services are held Tuesday of each week from 
7:40 to 8:00 o'clock A. M. This is more or less in the nature of a 
convocation, as well as a chapel service, and furnishes opportunity 
for announcements or for brief remarks upon subjects of immediate 
interest. 

Students' Mail. Students will avoid inconvenience by having their 
mail addressed, temporarily at least, to Station A, Ames, Iowa. This 
postoffice is located upon the College campus, and mail may be called 
for conveniently. 

Summer Employment. Students desiring summer employment 
should make application to Mr. J. P. Clyde, Secretary of the Y. M. 
C. A. Last summer there were many more calls for student help 
than could be supplied. 

Social Committee. The social committee, composed jointly of 
faculty members and students, will arrange for at least one social 
event each week. During past Summer Sessions these have been 
thoroughly appreciated as opportunities for acquaintance and en- 
joyment. 

Excursions. A number of excursions are arranged during the 
summer Session under the direction of a regular committee. So far 
as possible these are scheduled for Saturday, so as to give all 
students in the general courses, at least, an opportunity to take 
advantage of them. 

Recreation. While the primary object of the Summer Session 
is work and study, yet these will be facilitated by a sufficient amount 
of recreation. Students are urged to effect organizations and to 
arrange for tournaments in tennis, baseball, track, or indoor work. 
The Committee on Games and Recreation will encourage and help 
in organizing the details of this work. 

Special Lectures. A strong corps of special lecturers have been 
secured for the Summer Session, among them, Honorable 
P. P. Claxton, Commissioner of Education; Dr. W. Franklin 
Jones, of the University of South Dakota; Dr. Harold W. Foght, 
Rural School Specialist of the Bureau of Education; Miss Mabel 
Carney, author of the "Country School and Country Life;" Miss 
Adelaide Steele Baylor, Deputy State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction of Indiana. In addition to these and other special lec- 
turers for which arrangements have already been made, it is pro- 
posed to avail ourselves of the opportunity of securing a fair pro- 
portion of the unusual talent that will be close at hand when the 
National Education Association meets at St. Paul the first part 
of July. The Rural Life Conference will bring to us other men of 



national reputation, among them Dr. Luther H. Gulick, of New 
York City, and Ernest Thompson Seton, Chief Scout of the Boy 
Scouts of America. 

The plan will be to have at least two or three public lectures 
each week of the Summer Session. In addition to using outside 
talent, more use will be made of the large force of specialists at 
the Iowa State College. A definite schedule of public lectures will 
be announced at the opening of the session. 

Vocational Education and Vocational Guidance. Mrs. Anna L. 
Burdick, of the West Des Moines High School, has spent a number 
of summers in the east making special study of Vocational Educa- 
tion and Guidance a& it has been developed in the eastern states, 
particularly under Mr. Puffer and Mr. Bloomfield in Boston. It is 
with pleasure that special lectures by Mrs. Burdick are announced 
for the summer Session. She will be present during the entire 
week beginning June the 2 9th, and will lecture daily before the 
students and the Rural Life Conference. Typical subjects which 
she will discuss are the following: 

1. Vocational Education and Liberal Education. 

2. Vocational Guidance and Opportunities for Vocational Edu- 

cation. 

3. The Foundations of Vocational Efficiency. 

4. Appraisal of the Choice of a Vocational Typical Occupation. 

5. The Farm Boy as a Vocational Problem. 

6. Occupations open to Trained Women. 

7. Systems of Vocational Guidance already in Operation. 

The whole trend of legislation and of educational thought during 
the last few years has been toward an increased attention to voca- 
tional and industrial education. It is worth much in this connec- 
tion to have an opportunity to hear from one who can speak 
with authority. 

The Model School. The popular, two-room, consolidated, Model 
School will be continued, in charge of competent critic teachers. 
Regular work in observation and methods will be offered for stu- 
dents in the general courses, and the work of the model school will 
be used in the regular college courses in agricultural education. 
Courses offered in Agricultural Education will include Principles 
and Methods of Education, Secondary Education, and School Ad- 
ministration. This will enable us to serve directly the rural teacher, 
the grade teacher, the agricultural high school teacher, and the 
school administrator. While all of these courses are standard col- 
lege courses, the emphasis is placed upon the development of agri- 
cultural and industrial subjects in the school curriculum. 

The Model School will be used for observation and demonstra- 
tion purposes in connection with the work in didactics in the Rural 
and Grade Teachers' Course. 

Library. The Library of the Iowa State College will be open for 
the use of Summer Session students. The Library consists of 45,000 
volumes well distributed among the various departments, and pro- 
viding a great deal of general matter in addition to the technical 
works required by the various divisions. 

The Library is well supplied with periodicals and dailies. The 
number of magazines and periodicals is fully 500. There are 18 
dailies, and about 150 local papers from different parts of Iowa. 
There are papers from every county in Iowa. Personal assistance 
will be given by the librarian and her assistants to any who desire 
help in reference work. 



10 

The Agricultural Library in the Hall of Agriculture is supplied 
with the best books, bulletins, reports and agricultural papers and 
will be at the disposal of Summer School students both as a con- 
sulting and reading room. No fee is charged for the use of the 
reading rooms and the Library. 

Equipment. The College grounds and farms contain over 1,400 
acres. The larger portion is used for experimental farms, including 
the dairy, poultry and soil experiment farms. About 200 acres is 
set apart as a campus, upon which is located the buildings used for 
instruction, administration, and residential purposes. Here also 
are the various athletic fields. The natural beauty of the campus is 
enhanced by the many driveways and walks, by carefully arranged 
shrubs and trees, and by artistic landscape gardening. 

Thirty-six commodious buildings have been erected by the state 
for the exclusive use of the various departments of the College, 
besides the dwelling houses and the buildings for farm stock, 
machinery, and workshops. All of these buildings are lighted by elec- 
tricity and supplied with pure water. 

One who has never made a trip to the Iowa State College will 
be surprised at the extensive and superior equipment. This is all 
immediately serviceable in teaching the industrial subjects, and in 
preparing teachers to meet the requirements of the new legislation. 
The teachers of the state are entitled to the use of this equipment. 
The Summer Session offers the opportunity. The following is a 
brief detail of some of the features of the equipment which will be 
of more immediate service during the Summer Session. 

In the farm department, the College has 750 head of livestock, 
with a total value of $49,000. Much of this is high grade show 
stock. There is a modern demonstration poultry farm of twenty 
acres, complete in all of its appointments, and this especially ap- 
peals to the Summer Session teachers, because all teachers, men and 
women alike, can take an active interest in poultry, and can be 
expected to teach it successfully in the schools. There is a dairy 
herd of 5 3 cattle on a farm of two hundred acres. There is a modern 
dairy products manufacturing plant valued at $100,000. The soil 
and farm crop experiment plots occupy sixty acres. These are used 
directly in the Summer Session work, and show as nothing else 
could show the opportunities for agricultural work among the 
farmers. In fact, the leading educators of the state are urging 
that every consolidated school, at least, should have a school farm 
devoted to experimental and demonstration work. The Agricul- 
tural Engineering Department, which offers courses during the 
Summer Session, has fully $2 5,000 worth of farm machinery with 
demonstration opportunities. The Horticultural Department has a 
thoroughly equipped greenhouse under ten thousand feet of glass, 
and forty acres in orchards and truck crops. The Summer Session 
courses offered by the Horticultural Department plan to make 
abundant use of their equipment. The manual training work, which 
for the Summer Session is organized under the direction of a manual 
training instructor who has for a number of years been conducting 
such work in a large public school, has abundant facilities in the 
manual training shops in the Engineering Department of the Col- 
lege. An entire building, new and modern, is available for the 
work in home economics. 

Location. Ames is almost at the geographical center of the State 
of Iowa, on the main line of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. 
It la about thirty-five miles north of Des Moines, with which it is 
connected by a branch line of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad 



11 

and by the Fort Dodge, Des Moines and Southern (interurban) run- 
ning from Fort Dodge and Rockwell City to Des Moines. A branch 
of the Chicago & Northwestern from Ames penetrates the northern 
part of the State. Ames is proverbially a clean town, saloons and 
billiard halls being unheard of. 

The College is over a mile out but is connected by an electric car 
line, with frequent service and five-cent fare. 

The College Campus is said by those who have traveled much to 
be the most beautiful one in the United States. A gentleman, him- 
self a college president, who had visited all of the great colleges 
in America and many in Europe, said its buildings and Campus were 
unequalled. June is one of the best months in the year to enjoy 
its tranquil splendors. 

Students should plan to arrive on Saturday or Monday. In case 
it is absolutely necessary to arrive on Sunday, advanced notice 
should be given, with the request that rooms be arranged for, at 
least temporarily. In case of arrival on Sunday, without advanced 
notice, phone 652, the residence phone of the Director of the Sum- 
mer Session. 

Rural Life Conference. The Rural Life Conference will open on 
Monday, June 22, and continue for two weeks, closing Friday eve- 
ning, July 3. In the past this conference has been most helpful to 
Iowa and neighboring states in stimulating and developing rural 
leadership. An unusual array of talent has been secured for 1914. 
The following leaders in rural, religious and educational thought 
will be present during all or part of the two weeks: 

Herman N. Morse, Bennington County Improvement Ass'n, Ver- 
mont. 

Dr. Luther H. Gulick, author, lecturer, and president of the 
Campfire Girls of America. 

Miss Frances Gulick, specialist in Camp Fire Guardian work. 

Ernest Thompson Seton, author and chief scout of Boy Scouts of 
America. 

Hon. P. P. C'laxton, U. S. Commissioner of Education. 

Mabel Carney, author, and professor of Rural Education. 

Geo. H. Von Tungeln, professor of Rural Sociology. 

Mrs. Anna L. Burdick, specialist in Vocational Education and 
Guidance. 

Hon. James Wilson, Emeritus Professor of Agriculture. 

The lectures in the Rural Life Conference are free to Summer 
Session students as well as members of the Conference. For special 
bulletin giving detailed program of the Conference, write Dean 
Chas. F. Curtiss, Chairman of the Rural Life Conference Committee, 
or to the Director of the Summer Session. 



LEGAL PROVISIONS OF INTEREST TO TEACHERS 

Some recent legislation of interest to teachers is here inserted 
for their information. 

1. State Aided High Schools. According to section 2 634 of the 
Iowa School Law, provision is made for state aid amounting to 
$750 per annum to high schools providing certain normal training 
for rural teachers, and offering among other subjects elementary 
agriculture, home economics, and manual training. It is evi- 
dent to all acquainted with the facts that better preparation on the 



12 

part of teachers for handling the work in agriculture, home 
economics and manual training is most desirable in order to make 
the work in these selected high schools most effective. To supply 
these schools with teachers who have had four full years of college 
work in agriculture and home economics is apparently impossible 
at the present time, although a neighboring state is rapidly doing 
so. To meet the Iowa situation it will be necessary that teachers 
now in service avail themselves of every means to bring up their 
work in agriculture, home economics and manual training. The 
Summer Session offers one of the best opportunities. 

2. State Aided Consolidated Schools. The last General Assembly 
granted aid to consolidated schools, the amount varying from $4 50 
to $12 50 according to equipment. The law makes provision, how- 
ever, for the teaching of agriculture, home economics, and other 
industrial and vocational subjects. To secure the state aid it is 
necessary that the schools employ "teachers holding certificates 
showing their qualifications to teach said subjects." 

3. Teaching Agriculture, Home Economics and Manual Training. 
Chapter 2 48 of the Acts of the last General Assembly makes pro- 
vision as follows: "The teaching of elementary agriculture, dom- 
estic science and manual training shall after the first day of July, 
1915, be required in the public schools of the state, * * * * 
and after the date aforesaid elementary agriculture and domestic 
science shall be included among the subjects required in the exam- 
ination of applicants for teachers' certificates. 

4. Twelve Weeks Normal Training. The law relating to the 
qualifications of teachers as passed by the last General Assembly 
makes provision that after July 1, 1915, applicants for teachers' 
certificates shall have had at least 12 weeks of normal training. This 
does not apply to the graduates of accredited colleges and to 
teachers who have had at least six months successful teaching 
experience. 

Two Summer Sessions of six weeks each will be considered as 
the equivalent of twelve weeks of continuous work. 

The State Board of Examiners limits the amount of work that 
may be carried to four or five periods a day, one period being as- 
signed to education. 

5. Six Weeks of Teacher Training for Credit of 3 Points on 
Salary. Section 2 of the Minimum Teachers' Wage Law provides 
that "every teacher holding either a second or a third grade cer- 
tificate who has taught successfully for one year and attended an 
approved teachers' training school for a period of six weeks follow- 
ing shall receive a credit of 3 points in estimating the salary." 

The Summer Session of the Iowa State College gives teachers an 
opportunity to receive help directly in line with all of the legal 
provisions indicated above. The work is accredited for the twelve 
weeks normal training and for the six weeks of teacher training. 
Agriculture, home economics and manual training are the subjects 
in which the Iowa State College of all institutions is prepared to 
help teachers. 



13 



OFFICERS AND FACULTY 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

D. D. Murphy, President, Elkader. 
J. H. Trewin, Cedar Rapids. 

A. B. Funk, Spirit Lake. 

George T. Baker, Davenport. 

Roger Leavitt, Cedar Falls. 

Charles R. Brenton, Dallas Center. 

P. K. Holbrook, Onawa. 

Edward P. Schoentgen, Council Bluffs. 

Henry M. Eicher, Washington. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

W. R. Boyd, President, Cedar Rapids. 

Thomas Lambert, Sabula. 

W. H. Gemmill, Secretary, Des Moines. 

AUDITOR AND INSPECTORS. 

Jackson W. Bowdish, Auditor and Accountant, Des Moines. 
P. E. McClenahan, Inspector of Secondary Schools, Des Moines. 
John E. Foster, Assistant Inspector, Des Moines. 
L. I. Reed, Assistant Inspector, Des Moines. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS. 

Raymond A. Pearson, President, Central Building. 

E. W. Stanton, Vice-President, Central Building. 

G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session, Hall of Agriculture. 
Herman Knapp, Treasurer and Registrar, Central Building. 

SUMMER SESSION COUNCIL. 

Raymond A. Pearson, President. 

C. F. Curtiss, Dean of Agriculture. 

A. Marston, Dean of Division of Engineering. 

R. E. Buchanan, Acting Dean, Division of Science. 

Catherine J. MacKay, Acting Dean of Division of Home Economics. 

G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session, Hall of Agriculture. 



PROFESSORS. 



Robert Earle Buchanan, 
Orange Howard Cessna, 
Winfred Forest Coover, 
J. B. Davidson, 
Arthur Thomas Erwin, 
Louis Hermann Pammel, 
William Harper Pew, 
Louis Bevier Spinney, 
William Henry Stevenson, 
George Melvin Turpin, 
G. M. Wilson, 



Bacteriology. 

Psychology. 

Chemistry. 

Agricultural Engineering. 

Crops and Gardening. 

Botany. 

Animal Husbandr7. 

Physics. 

Soils. 

Poultry. 

Agricultural Education. 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS. 



Clare Newton Arnett, 
Henry Herbert Kildee, 
Grace Elfleda Russell, 
Louis Bernard Schmidt, 
L. A. Test, 



Animal Husbandry. 
Animal Husbandry. 
Domestic Art. 
History. 
Chemistry- 



14 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS. 



Jules Cool Cunningham, 
Henry Louis Eichling, 
Evans F. Ferrin, 
William Ray Heckler, 
Clyde McKee, 
H. J. Plagge, 
R. R. Renshaw, 
A. W. Rudnick, 
Grace Schermerhorn, 
Roy Eugene Smith, 
Julia R. Vaulx, 
Geo. H. VonTungeln, 
C. B. Williams, 



General Agriculture. 

Farm Crops. 

Animal Husbandry. 

Farm Crops. 

Farm Crops. 

Physics. 

Chemistry. 

Dairying. 

Agricultural Education. 

Soils. 

English. 

Economic Science. 

Economic Science. 



INSTRUCTORS. 



Alma Booth, 
Rosamund H. Kedzie, 
Max Levine, 
Agnes Gina Mosher, 
Bertha M. Riley, 
Rose M. Sherwood, 



Home Economics. 
Home Economics. 
Bacteriology. 
Mathematics. 
Home Economics. 
Poultry. 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 
Ingeborg Svendsen-Tune, Voice, Piano and Organ. 

SPECIAL INSTRUCTORS. 

W. H. Bender, Agricultural Education. 

Asst. Agricultural Education. 
E. C. Bishop, Club Work. 

State Leader Junior Work. 
Luella Chapman, Writing. 

Supervisor Writing in Marshalltown, Iowa, Schools. 

E. C. Davis, Agricultural Methods. 
Instructor Agricultural Education, Department of Agriculture, 
University of Minnesota. 

R. K. Farrar, Club Work. 

Extension Professor of Agricultural Education. 
Katherine Hamilton, Critic Teacher, Arithmetic. 

Public School Principal, Decatur, Illinois. 

F. W. Hicks, Pedagogy and English. 
Superintendent of Schools, Ames, Iowa. 

Ruth Jessup, Critic Teacher, Language. 

Critic Supervisor Grammar Department, Mankato Normal School. 
A. P. Laughlin, Manual Training. 

Supervisor of Manual Training in the Public Schools of Peoria. 
J. E. Moore, Assistant in Manual Training. 

Superintendent of Schools, Fayette, Iowa. 
N. C. Pervier, Assistant in Manual Training. 

Supervisor of Manual Training, Mountain Lake, Minnesota. 
F. P. Reed, History. 

Superintendent of Schools, Osceola, Iowa. 
Ora K. Smith, Critic Teacher, Geography. 

Head of Normal Training Department, Albert Lea, Minnesota. 
Bertha Stiles, Lower Grade Critic Teacher. 

Primary Supervisor, Hibbing, Minnesota. 



15 

SPECIAL LECTURERS. 

Dr. Robt. J. Aley, President University of Maine. 

Etta M. Bardwell, Teacher of Agriculture, Cedar Rapids. 

Adelaide Steele Baylor, Assistant State Superintendent of Indiana. 

J. H. Beveridge, Superintendent of Schools, Council Bluffs. 

Mrs. Anna L. Burdick, Specialist in Vocational Education; teacher 
in West Des Moines High School. 

Mabel Carney, Director of the Country School Department, Illinois 
State Normal University. 

Hon. P. P. Claxton, United States Commissioner of Education. 

Hon. A. M. Deyoe, State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Dr. Harold W. Foght, Specialist in Rural Education, U. S. Bureau 
of Education. 

John E. Foster, Assistant Inspector of Secondary Schools for 
Iowa. 

Dr. Luther H. Gulick, Author, President Camp Fire Girls of 
America. 

Frances Gulick, Specialist in Camp Fire Guardian Work. 

Dr. W. Franklin Jones, Professor of Education, University of 
South Dakota. 

Hon. J. Y. Joyner, State Superintendent Public Instruction, North 
Carolina. 

P. E. McClenahan, Inspector of Secondary Schools for Iowa. 

Fred L. Mahannah, Inspector of Normal Training Schools, Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction, Des Moines. 

Dr. Guilford H. Sumner, Secretary State Board of Health of Iowa. 

Ernest Thompson Seton, Author, Chief Scout of Boy Scouts of 
America. 

J. A. Woodruff, Inspector of Rural and Consolidated Schools for 
Iowa. 

GENERAL COURSES 

The general courses as here described are of a sub-collegiate 
grade, and are organized to meet the particular needs of teachers. 
While much of the work is in quality equal to the regular college 
work, it is not organized on a basis so as to give credit. The 
Summer Session students who expect to teach in high school, or who 
have the entrance requirements for college work are urged to take 
the regular college credit course. While it is more specialized, it 
Is at the same time more thorough, and past experience indicates 
that students who take the college credit work are on the whole 
just a little better satisfied because of the fact that they have the 
credit, and many of them later plan to complete the course. 

GENERAL COURSE SI, AGRICULTURE. 

This is a general course organized in the past for superintendents, 
principals and high school teachers who have suddenly been required 
to prepare for the teaching of agriculture in the high school. It is 
so planned as to largely cover the entire field of agriculture. The 
work is a combination of lecture, laboratory and demonstration 
work; is thoroughly practical, and has served reasonably well in 
the past to give prospective teachers a start toward the preparation 
for teaching agriculture in the high school. 

The work will be given by the regular college faculty, and in the 
same scientific manner as in the regular courses. The course plans 
to occupy six hours a day of the student's time for the entire six 



16 



weeks. This includes the time spent in laboratories, and the fol- 
lowing has been arranged as a tentative program: 



Hr. Begin 


8 


9 


10 11 


1 2 


3 


4 


1st week 




Poultry 


Pl*nt 
Propagation 


Stock 
Judging 






2d week 




Poultry 


Orchard & 
Garden 


Stock 
Judging 




R.L. C. 


3d week 




Farm 
Buildings 


Orchard & 
Garden 


Stock 
Judging 


Vocational 
Education 


R. L. C. 


4th week 




Feeds & 
Feeding 


Farm Crops 


Soils & 
Fertility 


Weeds & Plant Diseases 


5th week 


Methods 


Dairying 


Farm Crops 


Soils & 
Fertility 




Extension 


6th week 




Dairying 


Farm Crops 


Soils & 
Fertility 




Con- 
ferences 



A detailed description of the work follows: 

Animal Husbandry. Recognizing the importance of familiarizing 
our teachers with Iowa's most important industry, that of livestock, 
the department will offer a series of lectures and demonstrations 
covering the feeding, study of breed characteristics and the judging 
of domestic animals. Great care has been observed in outlining 
the work so as to make it useful in the fullest measure to our 
teachers. The teacher will not only receive instruction in the way 
of furnishing information, but also be given helpful suggestions as 
to the best methods of outlining and teaching this work. This is a 
line of work which can be made intensely interesting to every boy 
and girl in our school work. 

Farm Buildings. Farm buildings not only make up the largest 
item in the cost of farm equipment but also have a direct influence 
in the success, health and general well-being of rural life. 

This subject is arranged to bring the teacher in touch with the 
actual problems in farm building arrangement and construction 
as they now confront the Iowa farmer. It will include the location, 
arrangement, convenience, lighting, ventilation, construction and 
cost of the more common buildings of the farm. As far as the time 
will permit, the subject will be expanded to include farm water 
supplies, sewage disposal and artificial lighting plants. 

Farm Crops. The course in farm crops will be arranged so that 
the teacher will receive much of the same work that the pupils 
will be expected to get under his direction later. This is done in 
order that the teacher may have a direct knowledge of what he is 
teaching. 

Studies will be made in the class room, field, laboratory, and the 
experimental plots, of corn, wheat, oats, barley, rye and legumes. 
This study will include the selection, storing, testing of the seed, 
the cultivation of the soil to get the highest yields of each of the 
crops, the field botany of each of the cereals, and current practices 
peculiar to the crops under consideration. 

Farm Dairy Work. This course is outlined with the object in 
view of giving the public school teachers such information as will 
be of value as well as interest to them. The lectures will cover such 
subjects as secretion and composition of milk; the value of milk 
for fat; acid and adulteration; ice cream making on the farm; 
testing cows on the farm; farm butter making, etc. Work in the 
laboratory will be given in milk testing and ice cream making. 




A Section of the School Garden 



it. 



i 






w > / N ^fK V"" x -^ ? y * j$T- 




Model School Pupils in Home Economics 



JVlifci 




House Plan, Open 

Prepared by Third and Fourth Grade Pupils of Model School 





Central Building 




Dairy Building 




TTniT^ 



«>i 31111* 



-winn 



A Birds Eye Viewf 




Ionic Economics Building 




Observing and Judging Teaching 




Students Judging Cattle 




International Champion, Victor. (Jrown at the College. 



17 

Feeds and Feeding. The lectures given on the subject of feeding 
farm livestock will be so arranged as to cover the principles involved 
in the growth, feed and care of cattle, swine, sheep and horses. All 
of the lectures will be in close connection with the laboratory work 
given in the other Animal Husbandry Courses. 

Methods. Agriculture, the newest of public school sciences, opens 
to the teacher a new field of interesting and valuable work. The 
organization of agricultural knowledge, the placing of agriculture 
in a form as definite as that of the older sciences, and the applica- 
tion of established pedagogic principles to its teaching is one of 
the live problems of today. 

Round table discussions will offer opportunity for the considera- 
tion of any related subjects. 

The following topics will receive attention — courses of study in 
agriculture, texts, equipment, plans and methods of work, bulletins, 
club and canning work, community co-operation, and extension 
work from the high school. Professor E. C. Davis of the Department 
of Agricultural Education of the Minnesota Agricultural College 
will be present during a part of the Summer Session, and will tell 
us of the work in agriculture which is being done in the Minnesota 
high schools, including the extension work among farmers. 

Orchard and Garden. The development and care of the orchard 
and garden, varieties for Iowa, insect and fungous pests, and meth- 
ods of control. Planning and planting of the home and school 
grounds. 

Plant Propagation. A study of plant reproduction both sexually 
and non-sexually. Seeds, storage, testing, germination, cuttage, 
graftage, and budding, including simple laboratory exercises. 

Poultry Management. The work in poultry will include those fea- 
tures which are best adapted to use in public schools. Among the 
topics taken up are the general principles of feeding, breeding, 
housing, incubating and rearing, judging market eggs, testing eggs 
during incubation, judging breed and market types of poultry, study 
of feeds, etc. 

Soils. The work in soils will direct the attention of the student 
to some interesting and fundamental facts regarding the relation 
of soils to air, moisture and heat; the way in which soils supply 
growing plants with food materials, the nature of nlant food, and 
the influence of bacteria and legumes on soil fertility. The work 
will be given principally by means of demonstrations and only such 
apparatus will be used as can be easily obtained by any school, and 
almost without cost. The necessity of a proper amount of air, 
light, and moisture; factors influencing the air and water holding 
capacity of various soils, the movement of water through soils, the 
water removed by tile drains, methods whereby soil moisture may 
be conserved, and the influence of plant food on various crops, are 
some of the many things which will be demonstrated. 

Weeds and Plant Diseases. This work will be given under two 
general heads: 1st: Weeds. One of the most important problems 
confronting the Iowa farmer is the question of weeds. The annual 
loss to the farmer runs into the millions of dollars. This can 
largely be prevented if the farmers have a better understanding of 
weeds and their kinds. The teachers of the State can do a great 
deal to bring knowledge to the farmers in their respective com- 
munities. 

The course in weeds will consist of lectures, and practical work 
in the identification of the common weeds of Iowa, also the methods 
used in exterminating them, how weeds are scattered through the 



18 

purchase of seeds, farm implements, animals, water, and other 
agencies. Practical work in the field as well as the laboratory will 
be combined with the lecture work. 

The second division of the work will be plant diseases. Fungous 
pests of economic importance will be studied as follows: Classifica- 
tion briefly; stages both summer and winter; life history in rela- 
tion to temperature, moisture, sunlight, chemicals, insects, etc. 
Simple laboratory exercises will be given which may be repeated 
in the schools without expensive equipment. 

GENERAL COURSE S2, AGRICULTURE. 

This is a general course for farmers and business and professional 
men and women who wish to get a general knowledge of the funda- 
mentals of agriculture from the combined scientific and practical 
points of view. The course will be practically the same as Course 
SI, excepting the work in methods, for which other practical work 
may be substituted. 

GENERAL COURSES IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

General courses in home economics are organized for the pur- 
pose of helping teachers who do not wish to undertake college 
credit work in home economics, and also for the purpose of helping 
the home-makers of our state who desire to secure practical help 
and more scientific interest in their work. 

Teachers' Course. The Teachers' Course is organized with the 
particular purpose of helping rural and grade teachers who must 
prepare to teach the subject of domestic science in the schools to 
meet the requirements of the new legislation. All of the work will 
be organized from the teachers' viewpoint, and will emphasize the 
best method of presenting the work, and of connecting it up with 
the community needs and interests of the children. Three courses 
are offered. These may be taken simultaneously, or they may be 
taken in the order that will best serve the particular needs of the 
teacher. 

S-38. Rural and Grade Teachers' Course. The work in this 
course will be done under conditions and with equipment that can 
be easily duplicated in the rural schools. The emphasis will be placed 
on planning a suitable course of lessons, demonstration with stu- 
dents or pupils of the Model School as a class, lesson plans, co- 
operation with the home, and necessary equipment. 

S-32. Sewing. Planned for those who wish to teach sewing. As 
much subject-matter will be covered as the ability of the class will 
permit. The emphasis will be upon plain sewing, but help will be 
given on the selection and use of materials and the practical work 
of cutting, fitting and finishing of garments. 

S-3 7. Cooking. Planned for those who wish to teach elementary 
cooking. Work in food preparation, serving of meals, economical 
farm menus, and other work according to the interest and ability 
of the class. 

Home-makers' Course. The Home-makers' Course will omit all 
discussion of methods and presentation of work, and will go more 
directly to the home interests of the class, taking up such problems 
as relate themselves closely to city and rural homes. The work 
will include lessons in planning and serving meals. A course of 
lectures will be arranged to include a discussion of such subjects 
as personal hygiene, home sanitation, home care of the sick, and 
home decoration. 






19 

S-30. Sewing. Open to students who are entering for the first 
time. Planned especially for home-makers. 

S-31. Sewing. A continuation of course S-30, for those who 
have taken work in sewing during a single Summer Session. 

S-3 5. Cooking. A course in establishing a fundamental 
knowledge of foods. 

S-36. Cooking. More detailed work in food stuffs and food 
preparation will be given. Table setting, serving, and invalid cook- 
ery will also be considered. Comparison of various food stuffs with 
regard to cost, composition, nutritive value. Open to students who 
have taken the equivalent of a Summer Session's work in cooking. 

Home Economics students are requested to wear wash dresses in 
the cooking laboratories. White aprons, hand towels and holders 
will also be required. 

GENERAL COURSES IN MANUAL TRAINING. 

This work will have for its general object the preparation of 
teachers for manual training as taught in the best public schools. 
Three lines of work will be taken up; namely, shop instruction, 
mechanical drawing and general lectures on the history and organ- 
ization of manual training departments, and on methods of giving 
manual training instruction. 

The work will be of special value, first, to public school teach- 
ers who wish to prepare themselves for manual training, and 
second, to students who have already taken up some shop work 
and technical drawing and who wish to obtain the additional 
preparation needed to make their knowledge available in teaching 
manual training under the conditions found in the public schools. 

S-10. Elementary Wood-work With Its Related Drawing and 
Design. A course dealing primarily with grade work, the most 
fundamental uses of the tools considered and the simplest methods 
of drawing and of wood finishing. 

S-ll. Bench AVork in Wood, Wood-turning, and Cabinet Con- 
struction, With Their Related Drawing and Design. A course pri- 
marily arranged for high school (boys and the) teachers of high 
school boys. 

In each of the above courses Models -will be selected in the light 
of experience as to (a) what boys of certain ages are able to do; 
(b) the peculiar interests of boys at these same ages. Tool Proc- 
esses will be selected with reference to their vocational values and 
because they illustrate typical industrial problems. The Spirit of 
the work will be that of the artist craftsman, working not alone 
for personal, but for community ends as well. Originality of de- 
sign will be encouraged but the design must keep itself within the 
limits set by the type of work, the tools and the processes taught 
for the grade in hand. The method pursued will be the develop- 
ment of subject-matter by means of type models that illustrate the 
various tool processes. Drill will be given by asking each student 
to design and make other models that will illustrate the same tool 
processes. Practice teaching will be offered to the extent that each 
student will be given the opportunity to develop, drill, review, and 
test the class on some tool process. 

S-12. Mechanical Drawing for High Schools. A somewhat 
technical course dealing with (1) the proper use of the instru- 
ments; (2) lettering; (3) orthographic projection, including: (a) 
simple projection, (b) revolution of solids, (c) developments, (d) 
intersections; (4) practical applications of the above to (a) house 
plans and elevations, (b) the drawing of machine parts, (c) prob- 
lems in sheet metal work, (d) problems in roof framing. Texts 



20 

will be, Problems in Mechanical Drawing, C. A. Bennett, $1.00; 
Mechanical Drawing for Trade Schools, C. C. Leeds, $1.2 5. 

S-13. Pottery With Related Drawing and Design. 

S-14. Art and Light Metal-work. Models and tool processes 

will be selected in the same way and the spirit of the work will be 
the same as in Courses S-10 and S-ll. Among the special tool 
processes taught will be etching, boring, sawing, cutting with file 
and chisel, upsetting, bending, planishing, hardening, tempering, 
annealing, fastening with rivets, bolts, screws, soldering, brazing, 
coloring and lacquering. A special feature of the work will be the 
design of all projects made. 

The Texts used will be: Copper Work, Augustus F. Rose, $1.50; 
Class Room Practice in Design, J. P. Haney, $.50. 

S-15. Basketry and Weaving. 

S-16. Manual Training for Rural and Grade Teachers. Special 
equipment and exercises adapted to rural school conditions. See 
Rural and Grade Teachers' Course, following. 

RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSE. 

TUITION FREE. 

This course is offered to enable rural and grade teachers to have 
the advantages of the unusual facilities of the Iowa State College 
in preparation for teaching agriculture, home economics, and manual 
training in the public schools in an intelligent and effective manner. 
The instruction will emphasize the elementary side of the subjects, 
giving particular attention to methods of preparing material, and of 
organizing the work in rural schools. The laboratories and teaching 
equipment of the college, including the library and the experiment 
farms, will be available to the students, but the aim throughout 
will be to so handle the work as to illustrate the possibilities of 
.doing the work effectively under rural school conditions. The 
primary object of the course is to give work in the industrial sub- 
jects to present and prospective teachers, and other work will be 
offered only when carried along with industrial work. The course 
makes provision for the following work: 

1. General Agriculture. This course is planned after consul- 
tation with the State Department so as to meet the requirements 
of teachers who are preparing to teach agriculture in the rural 
and grade schools. The entire field will be covered in a general 
way, but emphasis will be placed upon those topics which are more 
directly useful to rural and grade teachers. The following topics 
will be treated in their appropriate order: The texture of soils, 
liming of soils, percolation of water through the soils, maintaining 
soil fertility, the selection of seed corn, judging and scoring of 
corn, seed corn testing, actual field problems relating to the stand 
of corn, the corn breeding plot, cultivation and improvement of 
corn, weeds and how to kill them, plant propagation, cuttings for 
house plants, layering and plant divisions, budding, pruning. 
Other grains and forage crops will be treated, according 
to the time available. Attention will also be given to the home 
garden and orchard, poultry, proper stocking and management of 
the farm, and other practical problems which can be profitably 
taken up in the rural schools. 

2. Home Economics. (Sewing and Cooking.) A course planned 
especially for rural and grade teachers. The students will be 
organized in a class, and cooking and sewing taught under con- 
ditions that can be duplicated in any rural school. All details 
will be carefully worked out as to equipment, subject-matter, and 
correlation with other lessons so that the teacher can easily do the 



21 

cooking and sewing in her own school with very little additional 
planning. 

3. Manual Training. The models selected will be those sug- 
gested by the home, farm, school and community interests of the 
rural school boys. Among the models that will be presented are 
the following: Farm projects, e.g., mail boxes, bird houses, fruit 
crates, milking stools, work benches, tool racks, tool chests, step 
ladders; school apparatus, e.g., corn trays, seed boxes, bulletin 
boards, screens, book racks, show cases, drawing boards and 
tables, cupboards for domestic science classes, filing cases, display 
shelves or cabinets for samples of farm products; home furniture, 
e.g., foot stools, plate racks, plant stand's, book racks, waste bas- 
kets, skirt boxes, etc.; play ground apparatus, e.g., swings, jump- 
ing-standards, teeters, merry-go-rounds, wands, spring boards, slid- 
ing boards, hurdles. 

These problems will be analyzed and classified into type problems 
and then one of each type will be worked through showing how to 
develop methods and skill that will make possible the successful 
making of all the others and a large number of similar projects 
at home. The spirit of the work will be the same as in the other 
courses. 

There will be opportunity for practice teaching in presenting and 
developing some problem before the class. 

4. Other Subjects. Other subjects needed by rural and grade 
teachers, as required for the first grade certificate, will be avail- 
able in this course only when taken along with industrial sub- 
jects. All phases of the work will be taught by competent teach- 
ers. 

5. Plan for Work In Successive Summer Sessions. While pro- 
vision is made for work in all of the subjects required for the first 
grade certificate in addition to agriculture, home economics, and 
manual training, teachers who enter upon work in this course are 
urged to make a schedule which will enable them to follow the 
work up to advantage in successive Summer Sessions. The follow- 
ing grouping of subjects is suggested on a basis of four successive 
Summer Sessions. 



1 


2 


3 


4 


General Agriculture 


Cooking 


General (Agriculture 


Manual Training 


Arithmetic 


Geography 


Manual Training 


Physiology 


Gen. Home Economics 


Reading? 


Sewing 


Didactics 


Penmanship 


Orthography 


History & Civics 


Physics 


Didactics 


Economics 


Algebra 


English 



Any student pursuing this work in such consecutive manner 
will be given special certificate showing the same. The teacher 
in service who is sufficiently interested to follow up her schooling 
in such systematic fashion should receive proper recognition. 

Rural and grade teachers coming for a single Summer Session 
are urged to take advantage of all of the industrial work that it 
is possible to get in the course. A teacher may meet the six weeks 
and twelve weeks requirements (see legal requirements, page 12) 
and still give very nearly all of the time to agriculture, home 
economics and manual training. Education must be taken to meet 
the requirements of the law, but that leaves a possibility of three- 
fourths of the time on industrial subjects. However, it may be 
better for a particular teacher to put some of the time on other 
subjects, as arithmetic, English, etc. The course is arranged to 
meet this need. 

Admission to this course requires graduation from the common 
schools and the recommendation of the county superintendent of 
schools. 



23 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 

There are many who wish to take some of the regular college 
courses either because of the intrinsic value of the work to them 
in a practical way or as a part of a regular college course to be 
completed later. 

The courses described below are the same as those offered dur- 
ing the college year and will be taught by the regular college fac- 
ulty. The descriptions are quoted from the regular College Catalog. 

As the Summer Session is approximately one third the length 
of a college semester, the number of hours per week devoted to a 
course in the Summer Session will be three times what is shown 
In the descriptions below. From six to eight hours per week con- 
stitutes full work in these college courses. There is little doubt but 
that the numbers in each course will justify offering it. 

A resolution adopted by the Iowa Council of Education last 
November indicated about thirty-two hours of technical agricul- 
ture of a college grade as the minimum for a regular teacher of 
agriculture in the high school. This amount of work will easily 
be secured in four successive Summer Sessions. The work in agri- 
culture offered during the summer of 1914 includes twenty courses, 
with a total of 47 2-3 credit 'hours. The prospective student who 
is looking forward to several Summer Sessions in succession is ad- 
vised to plan his work so as to cover the field in a reasonable man- 
ner and meet the minimum requirements as suggested by the Iowa 
Council of Education. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 

1. General Principles of Teaching. A fundamental course deal- 
ing with general principles underlying instruction; class-room 
management and method; the technique of the recitation; types 
of lessons and the standards for judging the same; the selection 
and organization of subject-matter; the bases for readjusting the 
curriculum to make room for new types of school work; efficiency 
in the management of the study period. Credit 3 hours. 

2. General Principles of Teaching. A continuation of Course 
1. Credit 3 hours. 

3. Principles of Secondary Education. The sources and de- 
velopment of the high school curriculum. The best present day 
high school practice. The organization and management of the 
high school. The pedagogical significance of the adolescent period. 
Secondary instruction and methods. Credit 2 hours. 

9. School Administration. The application of modern educa- 
tional methods to the solution of the problems of the school ad- 
ministrator, with especial reference to the work of the principal, 
the superintendent, and the fiscal agent of the board of education. 
Standards for measuring the efficiency of city and county school 
systems. State school systems, the apportionment of school 
funds, the tendency of school legislation. Special problems that 
may vary from year to year. During the year 1913-14 the School 
Survey Club has furnished the opportunity of applying standards 
of efficiency to thirty city school systems in Iowa. Advanced 
course. Credit 2 hours. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING. 
5. Farm Machinery and Farm Motors. Mechanics and mate- 
rials; the measurement and transmission of power; development, 
construction, functions and methods of operating, adjusting and 



S3 

repairing farm machinery and farm motors; also the principles 
of draft and the production of power. Laboratory work is de- 
voted to the study of construction, operation, adjustment and test- 
ing the machines discussed in the class rooms. Credit 2 2-3 hours. 
Fee $2.00. 

19. Rural Sanitation. The lighting, heating and ventilation of 
farm buildings. Sanitary construction, plumbing, systems of water 
supply and sewage disposal. Credit 1 hour. 

21. Cement Construction. The use of cement in farm build- 
ing construction. Cement testing, study of mixtures, construction of 
forms, reinforcements. Also other building materials. Credit 1 
hour. Fee $2.00. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

1. Market Types of Cattle and Sheep Includes the judging of 
different market classes of beef cattle, and sheep, both mutton and 
wool. Credit 2 hours. Fee $2.00 

2. Market Types of Dairy Cattle, Horses and Swine. Includes 
judging different market classes of dairy cattle, light and heavy 
horses, and swine (bacon and fat). Credit 2 hours. Fee $2.00. 

3. Breed Types of Cattle and Sheep. Judging representatives of 
different breeds according to their official standards, a study of 
their origin, history, characteristics, and adaptability to different 
conditions of climate and soil. Prerequisite 1. Credit 3 1-3 hours. 
Fee $2.00. 

4. Breed Types of Dairy Cattle, Horses and Swine. Judging of 
representatives of different breeds according to their official stan- 
dards, a study of their origin, history, characteristics, and adapta- 
bility to different conditions of climate and soil. Prerequisite 2. 
Credit 3 1-3 hours. Fee $2.00. 

BACTERIOLOGY. 

1. General Agricultural Bacteriology. Morphology, classifica- 
tion, physiology, and cultivation of bacteria, relation of bacteria to 
health of man and animals, to infection, contagion, immunity, and 
to other scientific and agricultural problems. Laboratory work on 
methods of cultivating bacteria and the study of bacterial func- 
tions and activities, the solution of specific problems, such as the 
bacterial content of air, water, and food, with interpretation of 
results reached. Prerequisite, Chem. 9. Credit 4 hours. Fee 
$3.00. 

15. General Bacteriology for Students in Animal Husbandry. 
A discussion of general bacteriology, followed by a study of the 
relationship of bacteria to agriculture, with particular reference to 
the live stock industry. Credit 2 2-3 hours. Fee $3.00. 

18. Household Bacteriology for Students in Home Economics. 
Bacteria in their relations to the home, including a brief considera- 
tion of the pathogenic forms and the bacteria, yeasts and molds in 
their zymotic activities. Prerequisite, Organic "Chemistry. Credit 
3 1-3 hours. Fee $5.00. 

BOTANY. 

15, or 70. Systematic Phanerogams. Study of the more im- 
portant families of flowering plants; historical survey of various 
systems of classification; study of groups by means of some rep- 
resentative, the herbarium of the college affording material for 
this purpose. Credit 3 to 5 hours. Fee $3.00 or $5.00. 

60. Botany of Weeds. Injury to farm, garden and horticultural 
crops, and the origin and distribution of weeds. Credit 1 2-3 
hours. Fee $3.00. 



24 

CHEMISTRY. 

21. General Chemistry. Introductory work. Study of non- 
metallic elements present in air and soil. Recitations review the 
work of the laboratory. Credit 4 1-3 hours. Deposit $6.00. 

22. General Chemistry. Introductory work which includes a 
study of the non-metallic elements. Recitations review the work 
of the laboratory. Credit 4 1-3 hours. Deposit $6.00. 

23. Qualitative Analysis. Continuation of course 21. Study 
of the metallic or base forming elements, their relation to non- 
metallic or the acid forming elements, and their place in formation 
of salts; the separation and recognition of these elements and 
their compounds preparatory to determining them quantitatively. 
Credit 4 1-3 hours. Deposit $7.50. 

24. Qualitative Analysis. Continuation of course 22. Study 
of the metallic elements, their relation to the non-metallic elements 
and the separation and recognition of both qualitatively. Credit 
4 1-3 hours. Deposit $7.50. 

2 5. Organic Chemistry. Elementary principles of organic 
chemistry. Lectures and recitations. Followed by a study of the 
chemical changes which occur during digestion, assimilation and 
metabolism. Laboratory work includes the preparation of a limited 
number of organic compounds and a study of the carbohydrates, 
fats and proteins. Prerequisite, course 2 3. Credit 3 2-3 hours. 
Deposit $6.00. 

26. Agricultural Analysis. The preliminary work involves the 
principles of gravimetric and volumetric analysis, followed by the 
analysis of fertilizers and soils or by the analysis of grain and 
mill feeds and fodders. Prerequisite Chemistry 2 5. Credit 3 1-3 
hours. Deposit $7.50. 

5 8. Organic Chemistry. Study of the principles of organic 
chemistry and their application to the related work in Home 
Economics. Special emphasis is placed upon the chemistry of the 
carbohydrates, fats and proteins in order to prepare the student 
for physiological chemistry. Laboratory work consists of the 
preparation of some typical organic bodies, followed by work on 
the carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Credit 4 1-3 hours. Deposit 
$7.50. 

59. Food Chemistry. Elementary work in gravimetric and 
volumetric analysis is given as a foundation. The analysis of milk, 
butter, oleomargarine, ice cream and cereal foods is tUen studied. 
Prerequisite 58. Credit 4 1-3 hours. Deposit $7.50. 

DAIRYING. 

10. Domestic Dairying. Nutritive and economic value of milk; 
its dietetics and hygiene; market milk, infants' milk, invalids' 
milk, cream, ice cream, condensed milk, milk chocolates, .ualted 
milk, dried milk, fermented milks (Kephir. Koumissete), butter- 
milk, butter and cheese. Demonstrations are given in types of 
butter and cheese and in testing the purity of milk and butter. 
Credit 2 hours. Fee $2.50. 

12. Farm Dairying. Secretion, composition, testing, separation 
and acidity of milk, preparation of starters, ripening of cream, 
churning and packing butter. Credit 2 2-3 hours. Fee $3.00. 

13. Milk Testing and Milk Inspection. Babcock test, Farring- 
ton's and Mann's test for determining acidity, sampling, and test- 
ing of individual cows, and detection of different preservatives and 
adulterations. Credit 1 2-3 hours. Fee $2.50. 



25 

APPLIED ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE. 

10. Agricultural Economics. Historical and comparative agri- 
cultural systems; land tenure, size of farms; co-operation; taxa- 
tion; prices; transportation; marketing; land credit; the relation 
of the state to agriculture. Credit 3 hours. 

24. Rural Sociology. This course will treat the social prob- 
lems of rural communities — the means of development of country 
life by way of a rural reconstruction through adaptation of exist- 
ing forces and local institutions, and state and community activi- 
ties. A study of rural population as to density, vital statistics, 
sanitation, migration or the cityward trend, nationality, standard 
of living, lack of community co-operation, the need of trained leader- 
ship, or willingness on the part of certain individuals to serve as 
leaders, etc., will demand attention. Social institutions, such as the 
rural schools, rural churches, rural libraries, boys and girls clubs, 
social centers, social surveys, county work, facilities for entertain- 
ment in the country, wider use of school and church plants as com- 
munity centers, with the possible improvement and extension of 
these will be taken up. Finally, a comparison of country with city 
respecting the age, birth rate, longevity, race, marriage, divorce, 
education, moral character and vice, criminality, public opinion, 
thrift, standard of living, economic, legal, political and social fac- 
tors affecting the quantity and quality of the population. Credit 
3 hours. 

ENGLISH. 

Lit. 6. The Short Story. The short story from the time of its 
development as a distinct literary form to the present time; the 
various types, with principal attention to the product of the last 
fifty years in France, England, and the United States. Credit 2 
hours. 

Eng. 10. Narration and Description. Expository and suggestive 
description; better vocabulary through search for the specific word; 
simple and complex narrative with incidental description; plot and 
characterization; securing interest, as well as clearness and good 
order; analysis of good models. Themes almost daily, to train the 
student to apply the principles studied. Credit 3 hours. Fee 25' 
cents 

FARM CROPS. 

1. Corn Growing and Judging. The corn plant, methods of 
selecting, storing, testing, grading, planting, cultivating and har- 
vesting. Cost of production, use of the crop, commercial market- 
ing, insects and diseases. Field study of corn with reference to 
per cent stand, barren stalks and suckers; leaf surface and corre- 
lation of the parts of the stalk. Laboratory study of the structure 
of the stalk, ear, and kernel. Scoring and judging of single ear 
and ten ear samples. Credit 2 2-3 hours. Fee $1.00. 

2. Small Grain. Oats, wheat (winter and spring), barley, rye, 
emmer, spelz and macaroni wheat; their adaptation to soils 
and climate, preparation of seed bed, methods of seeding, botani- 
cal structure, problems of germination and plant growth; also score 
card practice and the principles of commercial grading in small 
grains. Credit 2 2-3 hours. Fee $1.00. 

3. Corn and Small Grain Judging. Under conditions identical 
to those found in show rooms, the student receives a training which 
makes him an excellent judge of quality in these grain seeds. He 
studies variety and breed characteristics, giving special attention to 
the strong and weak points of each. Credit 2 hours. Fee $2.00. 



17. Grasses, Forage and Fiber Crops. Grasses grown in the 
corn belt, investigation into their composition, habits of growth, 
adaptability to various types of soils and climatic conditions and 
the methods of seeding and handling. Such forage and fiber crops 
as have been grown in Iowa, and others that could be profitably 
introduced, will be given study similar to the above. Special at- 
tention will be given to the growth and breeding of alfalfa, clover 
and timothy. Credit 2 hours. Fee $2.00. 

HISTORY. 

24. The Economic History of American Agriculture. A study of 
the settlement and agricultural development of the United States 
from 16u7 to the present time. Special attention is given to the 
westward movement; origin and growth of the public domain 
through successive territorial acquisitions; evolution of the federal 
land system; influences affecting the development of agriculture; 
relation of agriculture to other industries and comparison there- 
with. Text book, lectures, and assigned readings. Credit 2 hours. 
(Or credit will be given for History 14, by substitution, to students 
completing this course.) 

HOME ECONOMICS. 

1. Sewing. Drafting of patterns and hand sewing, including 
stitches, darning, patching, the making of button holes, etc., all 
of which will be applied to some useful garment. Credit 2 1-3 
hours. Fee $1.00. 

4. Sewing. Advanced drafting, hand and machine sewing, silk 
skirts, slips or tailored skirts and tailored waists will be made. 
Economical cutting of material, fitting of garments, and choice of 
materials will be discussed from the standpoint of economy and 
beauty. Credit 2 2-3 hours. Fee $1.00. 

41. Personal Sanitation and Hygiene. A lecture course upon 
the sanitary care of the person, clothing and surroundings, discus- 
sion of social and ethical questions which arise in community and 
college life. Credit 1 hour. 

4 3. Food Preparation. This course introduces the subject of 
foods and food preparation in its scientific and economic aspects. 
It is the study of the nutritive principles as they are found in 
various foods and the methods of cooking foods to retain those 
principles in digestible form; serving of foods in simple and at- 
tractive form, economy of money, time and labor being considered. 
Credit 2 1-3 hours. Fee $4.00. 

4 4. Food Preparation. A continuation of 43. Credit 2 1-3 
hours. Fee $4.00. 

HORTICULTURE. 

3. Orcharding. The establishment and care of home orchards 
and vineyards; systematic study of varieties adapted for planting 
in Iowa. Credit 2 2-3 hours. Fee $1.00. 

8. Landscape Gardening. Planting and decoration of home 
grounds and parks; ornamental trees adapted to planting in Iowa. 
The ornamental trees and shrubs on the campus and in the de- 
partment afford excellent material for laboratory work. Credit 2 
hours. 

MATHEMATICS. 

7A. Elementary Algebra as required by teachers preparing to 
take the examination for the first grade certificate. Text, Wells' 
High School Algebra. Recitation daily. 

17. Algebra and Trigonometry. The main object of this course 



27 

is to so ground the student in the principles of trigonometry as to 
enable him to carry successfully his work in surveying, drainage 
and allied subjects. The course is intended to give the student 
sufficient knowledge of the subject to enable him to elect analyt- 
ical geometry and calculus which are fundamental to certain lines 
of work. The points most strongly emphasized are: Care in trac- 
ing the trigonometric functions of varying angles in the different 
quadrants, readiness and skill in the derivation and reduction of 
trigonometric formulas and accuracy in the use of logarithmic 
tables. Credit 3 hours. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

14 0. Manual Training. Care and adjustment of hand and 
power tools, joinery, cabinet making, wood finishing, polishing and 
varnishing, wood turning and carving. An elective course especially 
arranged for students in Industrial Science and women students 
in Home Economics who desire to prepare themselves to teach 
Manual Training. Lectures supplemented and illustrated by work 
in the shops. Credit 1 2-3 hours. 

121. Mechanical Drawing. Use of drawing instruments, prac- 
tice in lettering, and making working drawings. Credit 2 hours. 

181. Mechanical Drawing. The use of drawing instruments, 
making of working drawings. Credit 1 hour. 

220. Descriptive Geometry. Study of the principles of pro- 
jection of the point, line, and plane. The principles are illustrated 
and fixed in mind by the solution of numerous familiar examples 
to show the practical application of the subject. Credit 2 hours. 

130. Shop Work. Forge work, forging and welding iron and 
steel, and dressing and tempering tools. Credit 2 hours. Fee 
$5.00. 

331. Shop Work. Pattern work, principles of joinery, wood 
turning, and carving as applied to the making of simple patterns 
and core boxes for iron, brass and aluminum castings. Credit 2 
hours. Fee $5.00. 

PHYSICS. 

2 05. Mechanics, Heat and Light. Fundamental principles of 
Physics and their applications. Prerequisite Math. 17. Credit 3 
hours. Fee for mimeograph notes $1.50. 

4 04. Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Sound. Prereq- 
uisite 303. Credit 5 hours. Fee $2.00. 

POULTRY. 

46. General Poultry Management. Present status of the poultry 
industry, various kinds of poultry products ordinarily produced for 
sale with special reference to their relative importance and their 
production as a branch of general agriculture and as a specialized 
industry, brief consideration of the more important classes and 
breeds of poultry and poultry management dealing particularly with 
breeding and feeding. Credit 2 hours. Fee $2.00. 

4 7. General Poultry Management. Continues the work in 
course 4 6 and takes up, in a general way, marketing, incubation 
and brooding, housing and yarding. Credit 2 hours. Fee $2.00. 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

6. Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence. The various 

mental features of child growth; characteristics of childhood and 

the significant mental changes of the adolescent period, with special 

reference to the needs of teachers and parents; the individual, par- 



28 

ental and social instincts; the adaptive instincts; imitation, cur- 
iosity, play. Special attention is given to the educational value 
of play; the regulative instinct; moral and religious; the collect- 
ing and constructive instincts, etc. The Montessori System and its 
application illustrated by simple apparatus. The Psychology of 
Adolescence. The Boy Scout Movement, Camp-fire Girls and athlet- 
ics, etc. The psychology of cooking clubs and corn-judging con- 
tests, etc. The instincts of childhood and adolescence and their 
place in the natural method of development. Text-book, lectures, 
and demonstrations. Credit 3 hours. 

7. Descriptive Psychology. This course treats of the elements 
and outlines of psychology, and is designed as an introduction to 
the other courses in psychology and principles of education and 
child study. Standard texts are used such as those of Angell, 
James, Tichener, Thorndike, together with Seashore's Elementary 
Experiments in Psychology, supplemented by lectures, and illustra- 
tive experiments before the class. Credit 3 hours. 

SOILS. 

1. Soil Physics. Origin, formation and classification of soils; 
soil moisture and methods of conserving it; the principles which 
underlie dry farming; soil temperature, and conditions influencing 
it; soil texture as affecting heat, moisture and plant food, surface 
tension, capillarity, osmosis, and diffusion as affecting soil condi- 
tions; the effect upon the soil and the crop of plowing, harrowing, 
cultivating, cropping, and rolling; washing of soils and methods of 
preventing the same; preparation of seed beds; cultivation and 
drainage as affecting moisture, temperature, root development and 
the supply of available plant food. The work also comprises the 
determination of the specific gravity, apparent specific gravity, 
volume weight, porosity, water-holding capacity, and capillary power 
of various soils; also effect of mulches on the evaporation of water 
from the soil and the physical effects upon the soil of different 
systems of rotation and of continuous cropping. Credit 4 hours. 
Deposit $4.00. 

2. Soil fertility. Maintenance of fertility, fertilizers and rota- 
tions; the influence of commercial fertilizers, barnyard manure, and 
green manure upon the quality and yield of various crops; the 
effect of different crops upon the fertility of the soil and upon suc- 
ceeding crops; different systems of rotation and the effect upon the 
productiveness of the soil of various methods of soil management; 
also storing, preserving, and application of farm-yard manure. 
This work is supplemented by a laboratory study of manures, fer- 
tilizers and soils; their composition and agricultural value. Pot and 
field experiments are conducted to show the influence of fertilizers 
applied to the soil in different quantities and at different times, upon 
the quality and yield of various crops. Special attention is given 
to legumes as fertilizers and their place in crop rotation. Special 
types of soil which are found in different sections of the state, such 
as clay, gumbo, loess, and peat, are studied with special reference to 
the best methods of handling and cropping these soils. In connec- 
tion with the laboratory instruction the student is urged to make a 
chemical study of samples of soil taken from the home farm or of 
any other soil in which he may be interested. Prerequisite 1. 
Credit, 4 hours. Pee .$8.00. 

MUSIC. 
Members of the Summer School and others desiring musical in- 
struction will be offered courses in Voice, Piano, and Organ. The 



•2 9 



regular Summer Course in music will consist of three lessons a 
week, private lessons. These lessons are extra and not included 
In the regular college fee and must be arranged for with the director 
of the School of Music. The fees are payable in advance at the 
Treasurer's Office. 

Anyone desiring a lesser number of lessons than the regular 
Summer Course will pay a slightly higher rate, than the following 
prices: 

Three lessons a week in Voice, $18.00 for Summer Session. 

Three lessons a week in Piano, $18.00 for Summer Session. 

Three lessons a week in Organ, $18.00 for Summer Session. 

The practice pianos of the School of Music will be at the dis- 
posal of students at the following rates: One hour a day for the 
six weeks or less, $1.50; two hours a day, $2.50; three hours a 
day, $3.50. 

These are the regular rates charged in this department during 
the college year. 

Address J. C. Harris, 

Director School of Music. 

SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS 



Where schedules can be changed to the advantage of some students 
without inconvenience to others, changes will be made freely. 

Recitations daily unless otherwise specified. 

Abbreviations: A. Ed. — Agricultural Education. A. E. — Agricultural 
Engineering. Ag. H. — Agricultural Hall. A. H. — Animal Husbandry. 
Bac. — Bacteriology. Bot. — Botany. Cen. — Central Building. Chem. — 
Chemistry. D. B. — Dairy Building. Econ. — Economics. En. H. — Engi- 
neering Hall. Eng. — English. F. C. — Farm Crops. H. E. — Home Eco- 
nomics. H. E. B. — Home Economics Building. Hist. — History. Hort. — 
Horticulture? Lab. — Laboratory. Lit. — Literature. L. P. — Lower Pavilion. 
Math. — Mathematics. M. E. — Mechanical Engineering. O. A. — Old Agri- 
cultural Hall. Phys. — Physics. Poul. — Poultry. Psych. — Psychology. R. — 
Room. Rec. — Recitation. U. P. — Upper Pavilion. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES. 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


A. E. 


5 


Rec. 5 Lab. 3-5 Tu. Th. Sat. 


204 O. A. 


A. E. 


19 


10 M. W. F. 




204 O. A. 


A. E. 


21 


10-12 Tu. Th. Sat. 




204 O. A. 


A. Ed. 


1 


8, observation hrs. 
ranged 


to be ar- 


208 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 


2 


5, observation hrs. 
ranged 


to be ar- 


210 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 


3 


3 




210 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 


9 


9 




217 Ag. H. 


A. H. 


1 


7-9 




U. P. 


A. H. 


2 


10-12 




U. P. 


A. H. 


3 


Rec. 3 Lab. 7-9 




L.P., 6 Ag. H. 


A. H. 


4 


Rec. 4 Lab. 10-12 




L. P. & 117 Ag. H. 


Bac. 


1 


Rec. 9 Lab. 7-12 as 


arranged 


312 Cen. 


Bac. 


15 


Rec. 9 Lab. 7-12 as 


arranged 


312 Cen. 


Bac. 


18 


Rec. 7 Lab. 7-12 as 


arranged 


312 Cen. 


Bot. 


15 


Rec. 11 Lab. 1-4 




312 Cen. 


Bot. 


70 


Rec. 11 Lab. 1-4 




312 Cen. 


Bot. 


60 


Rec. 10 M. W. F. Lab. 1-3' Tu. 


312 Cen. 






Th. Sat. 







30 



COLLEGE CREDIT COURSE.-Continued. 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


Chem. 


► 21 


Rec. 8 daily 1 M. W. F. 
10-12 


Lab. 


204 


O. A. 


Chem. 


22 


Rec. 8 daily 1 M. W. F. 
10-12 


Lab. 


204 


O. A. 


Chem. 


23 


Rec. 9 daily 1 Tu. Th. Sat. 
10-12 


Lab. 


204 


O. A. 


Chem. 


24 


Rec. 9 daily 1 Tu. Th. Sat. 
10-12 


Lab. 


204 


O. A. 


Chem. 


25 


Rec. 10 daily 2 M. W. F. 
8-10 Tu. Th. Sat. 


Lab. 


208 


O. A. 


Chem. 


26 


Rec. 10 Lab. 8-10 daily 




208 


O. A. 


Chem. 


58 


Rec. 10 daily 2 M. W. F. Lab 


8-10 


5 


H. E. B. 


Chem. 


59 


Rec. 11 daily 2 Tu. Th. Sat. 
8-10 


Lab. 


204 


O. A. 


Dairy 


10 


8 




11 


D. B. 


Dairy 


12 


Rec. 11 Lab. 3-5 M. W. F. 




11 


D. B. 


Dairy 


13 


3-5 Tu. Th. Sat. 




11 


D. B. 


Econ. 


10 


10 daily 2 M. W. F. 




222 


Cen. 


Econ. 


24 


8 daily 2 Tu. Th. Sat. 




222 


Cen. 


Eng. 


10 


10 daily 3 M. W. F. 




3 


Cen. 


Lit. 


6 


1 




3 


Cen. 


F. C. 


1 


Rec. 9 Lab. 1-3 M. W. F. 




307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 


2 


Rec. 3 Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. Sat. 


307 


Ag. H. 


F. C. 


3 


4-6 




307 


Ag. H. 


F. C. 


17 


Rec. 7 M. W. F. Lab. 7-9 Tu 


. Th. 










Sat. 




307 A 


Hist. 


14 


9 




208 


Cen. 


H. E. 


1&4 


Rec. 7 Lab. 8-12 




110 H. E. B. 


H. E. 


41 


9 




10 


H. E. B. 


H.E. 43-44 


Rec. 7 Lab, 8-12 




202 


H. E B. 


Hort. 


3 


Rec. 10 Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. Sat. 


308 


O. A. 


Hort. 


8 


11 




208 Ag. H. 


Math. 


17 


7 daily 1 M. W. F. 




221 


Cen. 


M. E. 


121 


Daily 8-12, 1-5 




401 


En. H. 


M. E. 


130 


Daily 1-5 




Forge Shop 


M. E. 


140 


Daily 8-12, 1-5 




Pattern Shop 


M. E. 


181 


Daily 8-12, 1-5 




401 


En. H. 


M. E. 


220 


Daily 8-12, 1-5 




401 


En. H. 


M. E. 


331 


Daily 1-5 




Pattern Shop 


Phys. 


205 


10 daily 2 M. W. F. 




113 


En. H. 


Phys. 


404 


Rec. 8 and 3 Lab. 10-12 M. W. F. 


112 


En. H. 


Poul. 


46 


1 




Po. 


Lab. 


Poul. 


47 


2 




Po. 


Lab. 


Psych. 


6 


8 daily 4 M. W. F. 




210 


Cen. 


Psych 


7 


11 daily 4 Tu. Th. Sat. 




210 


Cen. 


Soils 


1 


Rec. 9 Lab. 1-3 




6 Ag. H. 


Soils 


2 


Rec. 8 Lab. 10-12 




6 Ag. H. 



•Chemistry Laboratories will be open daily from 8-12 and 1-5. Lab- 
oratory periods may be varied to some extent to suit convenience of 
students. 



31 



RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSE. 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


Arithemtic 


7:00 to 


7:40 


208 Ag. H. 


Geography 


8:00 to 


8:40 


210 Ag. H. 


Physiology 


8:50 to 


9:30 


210 Ag. H. 


Cooking 37 


8:50 to 


10:20 


200 H. E. B. 


ReadiDg 


9:45 to 


10:20 


208 Ag. H. 


Didactics 


10:30 to 


11:10 


6 Ag. H. 


General Domes- 








tic Science 38 


10:30 to 


12:00 


208 H. E. B. 


History 


1:00 to 


1:40 


210 Ag. H. 


Sewing 32 


1:00 to 


2:30 


102 H. E. B. 


Didactics 


1:50 to 


2:30 


210 Ag. H. 


Gen. Agriculture 


1:50 to 


3:20 


117 Ag. H. 


Penmanship and 








Orthography 


3:30 to 


4:10 


208 Ag. H. 


English (gram- 








mar) 


4:20 to 


5:00 


208 Ag. H. 


Manual Training 


5:00 to 


6:30 


M. T. Shops 



(Sections will be formed in sufficient numbers to accommodate the 
students.) 



OTHER FIRST GRADE CERTIFICATE SUBJECTS. 



Course 


Hour of 


Recitation 


Room 


Civics 

Algebra 

Economics 

Physics 

Manual Training 


7:00 to 7:40 
8:00 to 8:40 
10:00 to 10:50 
8:50 to 10:20 
3:30 to 5:00 


209 Cen. 

221 Cen. 

222 Cen. 
207 En. H. 
M. T. Shops 



GENERAL HOME-MAKERS' COURSE IN H. E. 



Course 


Hour of 


Recitation 


Room 


H. E. 30 
H. E. 31 
H. E. 35 
H. E. 36 


1:00 to 3:00 

3:00 to 5:00 

9:00 to 11:00 

10:00 to 12:00 




100 H. E. B. 
100 H. E. B. 
208 H. E. B. 
208 H. E. B. 



GENERAL COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 
See page 16 for schedule. 



RURAL LIFE CONFERENCE. 
Schedule in special folder sent on request. 



MODEL SCHOOL PROGRAM. 
R. 109. Ag. H. Grades, First, Second and Third. 



Opening exercises 
Reading 1 
Reading 2 
Reading 3 
Rest 



9:45 
10:15 
10:35 
10:55 
11:15 



Language, history, and stories 
Numbers, Second Grade 
Numbers, Third Grade 
Phonics 1 
Phonics 2 and 3' 



R. 110. Ag. H. Grades Fifth, Sixth and Eighth. 



8:00 


Opening exercises 


9:45 


Arithmetic 


8:20 


English 


10:00 


Arithmetic 


8:40 


English 


10:20 


Geography 


9:00 


English 


10:45 


History 


9:20 


Arithmetic drill 


11:10 


History 


9:40 


Rest 







SUGGESTIONS TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

1. Read carefully the description of the various courses and 
other matter in this bulletin, and if the information is not suf- 
ficiently specific, do not hesitate to write for particulars. 

2. Fill out and mail the information blank on page 2, which 
will give us an idea of your demands. This places you under 
no obligations, but it gives the Director of the. Summer Ses- 
sion a better basis for making plans to handle the work on an 
efficient basis when you arrive. 

3. Upon your arrival at the depot in Ames, make yourself 
known to a member of the Reception Committee, who will be 
recognized by the college badge. If for any reason you miss the 
committee, take the college car to the college, and get off at the 
Farm Station. Go direct to Agricultural Hall. The Bureau of In- 
formation will be found in the east corridor of the main floor. 
Opportunity will be there offered for checking your grips until you 
have located a room and are ready for them. 

If you come on the interurban, get off at the Campus. 

4. The following is the plan of registration. 

(1) Go to the Registrar's office, fill out the two cards 
there furnished you, pay the Summer Session fee, and obtain 
a receipt. 

(2) Go to room 111, Agricultural Hall, for classification. 
Have in mind the work which you want as definitely as pos- 
sible, but do not hesitate to ask questions and be fully ad- 
vised before completing classification. 

(3) If any of your courses carry laboratory fees, fee 
cards may be secured from the instructors, and fees paid at 
the Treasurer's office. 

5. There are ample accommodations, and advanced notice is not 
necessary. The college has been accustomed to handling 2 500 
students during the regular year, and knows how to do it right. 
However, if your plans are matured sufficiently early, it will assist 
in rapid assignment and registration if advanced notice is given. 



"To despise nothing in the world except 
meanness and to fear nothing except 
cowardice, to be governed by your ad- 
mirations rather than your disgusts, to 
covet nothing that is your neighbor's ex- 
cept his kindness of heart and gentleness 
of manner; to think seldom of your 
enemies, often of friends, and every day 
of Christ; and to spend as much time 
as you can, with body and with spirit, 
in God's out-of-doors — these are little 
guide posts on the foot path to peace." 
— Henry Van Dyke. 



Jummer sJessiorv^ 
owa State College 




DEC % » WW 



• 



oreicial publication 
owa State College of agriculture 

AND MECHANIC ARTS 



COURSES OFFERED IN 1915 

1. For High School Teachers, Superintendents, and College 

Students the following college credit courses: 

Agriculture — (27 regular courses) 

Agricultural Engineering 3 courses 

Animal Husbandry 5 

Dairying 2 " 

Farm Crops .... 5 " 

Forestry 1 " 

Horticulture 5 

Poultry 2 " 

Soils 4 

Agricultural Economics 1 " 

Agricultural Education 7 " 

Bacteriology 3 " 

Botany 4 " 

Chemistry 10 

English and Literature 4 " 

Geology 2 " 

History 1 

Home Economics S 

Manual Training 4 " 

Mathematics ..3 " 

Physics 2 " 

Psychology 4 

Rural Socialogy 1 " 

Shop Work 2 " 

General courses in agriculture, manual training and home 
economics adapted for high school teachers. 

2. For Rural <ni<f <lr<i<1c Teachers. A course offering in- 
struction in the industrial subjects, — agriculture, home eco- 
nomics and manual training. Enough work is provided in 
these subjects to occupy the full lime of the student, 1ml a pari 
of his time may be spenl in special classes in didatics, the 
common branches, and other first grade certificate subjects. 
Tuii ion in t his course is free. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

AND MECHANIC ARTS 

Vol. XIII. APtJIL 1, 1915 No. 32 

Summer Session 

General Announcement 



1915 



i,I 



mes, lowa 



Published Tri-Monthly by the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Me- 
chanic Arts. Entered as Second-class Matter, October 26, 1905, at the 
Post Office at Ames, Iowa, under the Act of Congress of July 3 6, 1904. 



2 — 



1915 SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR 

Up to June 12 — Advanced registration. 

June 12, Saturday — Registration, 8 A. M. to 5 P. M. 

June 14, Monday — 8 A. M., Registration continued. 1 P. M., Work 
begins on regular schedule. 

June 19, Saturday — Regular work in A. M. (to make up work miss- 
ed Monday A. M., June 14). 

June 21, Monday — 4 P. M., Opening of Rural Life Conference, con- 
tinues two weeks. 

June 23, 24, 25, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. — Examination 
for county uniform certificates. Room 207, Eng. Hall. 

June 28, 29, Monday and Tuesday — Special Rural School Confer- 
ence, and County Superintendents' Conference. 

July 12, Monday — Shakesperean Festival, Ben Greet Woodland 
Players. 

July 23, Friday — 4 P. M., close of first half of Summer Session. 



July 20, Monday — 8 A. M., beginning of second half of Summer 
Session. 

July 28, 29, 30, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday — Examination 
for County Uniform Certificates. Room 207, Eng. Hall. 

Sept. 3, Friday — 4 P. M., close of the Summer Session. 

(The general course work for the second half may be condensed 
into five weeks by using Saturdays, all concerned in any class, agree- 
ing.) 



3— 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

General Statement. — Summer Session work was offered by the 
Iowa State College for the first time in 1911. In that summer a 
short course extending over two weeks was attended by about fifty 
superintendents and high school teachers of the state. Since that 
time the interest in agriculture and industrial subjects has in- 
creased tremendously, not only in this state, but throughout the 
United States. At the present time 19 states require the teaching 
of agriculure in the public schools, and in many more of the states 
agriculture is taught, especially in the high schools. In 1912 the 
Summer Session was extended to six weeks, and had a total enroll- 
ment of 128 students. The third Summer Session, 1913, enrolled 
225 students. These students came from 63 counties of the state 
and 10 spates of the Union. 

The Summer Session last year had a total attendance of 618. 
They represented 96 counties in the state, 15 states and 6 foreign 
countries. Eighty-eighjt per cent of them were teachers in the pub- 
lic schools and not in attendance during the regular college year. 
The enrollment in the classes in industrial subjects and the hearty 
response of the teachers to this work, show the wisdom of the legis- 
lature in passing the law relating to the teaching of these subjects 
in the public schools. 

Teachers in service can be helped best through the Summer Ses- 
sion, and in a large measure, at least, they have a right to the ad- 
vantages of the unusual equipment of the Iowa State College. This 
is especially true since the legislation requiring the teaching of the 
industrial subjects in the public school. No other institution in the 
middle west has a better selected faculty, or more adequate equip- 
ment than the Iowa State College. 

The large response last year by rural and grade teachers for 
work in agriculture, home economics and manual training justifies 
increased provision for such work this year. This course is offered 
on a free tuition basis and represents an effort of the Iowa State 
College to meet its responsibility in helping to make provision for 
the teaching of the new subjects in the public schools. In other 
lines the work will be very conservatively extended; new courses 
being offered only in response to outstanding and obvious demands. 

Who May Properly Attend. On account of the easy conditions 
of entrance, many receive benefit from the Summer Session who do 
not attend during the regular year. The following should be par- 
ticularly interested in the Summer Session: 

1. All TEACHERS, or persons expecting to teach next year, 
may use the Summer Session to secure work in the industrial sub- 
jects as required by the recent legislation. Teachers in the ele- 
mentary schools will find profitable work in the Rural and Grade 
Teachers' Course. High school teachers may secure strong work 
along particular lines as listed under college credit courses. 

2. SUPERINTENDENTS, PRINCIPALS AND SUPERVISORS. 
The large number of superintendents and principals who have been 
enrolled in the Summer Session in the past indicates clearly that 
it is serving them to good advantage, and meeting a special need 
which they feel for getting acquainted with the newer subjects of 
manual training and agriculture, or of pursuing courses in agricul- 






tural education. An examination of the Iowa Directory indicates 
that agriculture is taught in the high schools of the state by the 
superintendents more often than by any other single group. Begin- 
ning and advanced courses are offered in the present session in 
soils, farm crops, animal husbandry, dairying, agricultural engi- 
neering, horticulture, and in the related subjects of rural sociology, 
agricultural economics, agricultural education, botany, bacteriol- 
ogy, etc. The Summer Session gives such superintendents and 
principals an opportunity to secure work of a high character under 
regular college instruction and under the most favorable condi- 
tions. 

3. COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS are offered a special pro- 
gram during the second week of the Rural Life Conference, the 
week beginning June 28th, but some are planning to be present the 
entire six weeks. 

4. HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES will find an opportunity to 
start the college course or to satisfy entrance requirements. High 
school graduates who think of entering the Iowa State College in 
the fall of 1915 may take advantage of the Summer Session to be- 
come acquainted with college methods and to secure work towards 
graduation. Increasing numbers are taking advantage of the Sum- 
mer Session for this purpose. 

5. REGULAR STUDENTS IN THE IOWA STATE COLLEGE 
may make up back work, shorten their course by doing advanced 
work or increase their electives. 

6. STUDENTS in other colleges who are interested in the in- 
dustrial work and related lines will find other colleges willing to 
substitute credits made at this institution. 

7. FORMER GRADUATES may complete the necessary work in 
psychology and agricultural education in order to secure the first 
grade state certificate. 




Showing Distribution of Iowa Students. 



—5- 



8. ANY MATURE INDIVIDUAL who gives evidence of ability 
to carry the work with profit will be admitted without examination, 
but such individual must satisfy the department concerned as to 
his ability to carry the work. 

9. RURAL AND VILLAGE MINISTERS will find especially val- 
uable help in the Rural Life Conference. Bankers, farmers, rural 
leaders, mothers and daughters will find a welcome, an atmosphere 
of culture and inspiration, and practical help for their work. 

Conditions of Admission. All students who can profit by the in- 
struction offered will be admitted without examination. It is pre- 
sumed that all applying for admission have a serious purpose, and 
are interested in the industrial work. College credit will be grant- 
ed, however, only to those who meet standard entrance require- 
ments. 

Courses and Credits. A total of over eighty college credit 
courses is offered. Twenty-seven of these are in agriculture. An 
average student should be able to make six hours credit during a 
single half of the Summer Session. All courses offered are com- 
pleted during a single half of the Summer Session by increasing 
the number of recitations per week. There are no split courses. 
A student desiring to carry more than six (or six and a fraction) 
hours of college credit work will be required to make application 
for permission to take extra work, application being countersign- 
ed by the instructors involved. The committee on extra work will 
meet Monday evening, June 14. 



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Summer Session Growth at Ames. 



— 6 — 



Late Entrance. Because of the rapidity with which the work 
moves in a short session, students should enter in time to attend 
the first session of all classes. After Wednesday evening, June 16, 
students must secure the consent of professors in charge of courses 
and bring such statement of consent to the classifying officers in 
order to secure classification. The general courses in home econ- 
omics for homemakers are excepted from this rule. 

General Courses. In the general courses students will be given 
more freedom as to the number of hours to be carried, with this 
proviso, that in case they desire certificates under the new legisla- 
tion requiring twelve weeks of professional training, or increased 
wages because of attending a Summer Session for six weeks, they 
will be limited in the amount of work that can be carried according 
to the regulations sent out by the State Educational Board of Ex- 
aminers. (See legal requirements, p. 14). 

Special Work. Students wishing to do advanced or other special 
work not announced in this bulletin should communicate at an early 
date with the Director of the Summer Session, or with the professor 
in whose department they wish to work. Consideration may be 
given to a sufficient number of requests. 

Meeting Residence Requirements for a Degree Through Summer 
Session Work. Because of the largely increased attendance at the 
Summer Session, provision has been made for the satisfying of resi- 
dence requirements for a degree on the basis of four Summer Ses- 
sions equalling one full academic year in residence. This will en- 
able graduate students to complete the work for the Master's de- 
gree by attending four consecutive Summer Sessions. It is pos- 
sible that the amount of work required for the degree may have to 
be supplemented by work in absence, or by correspondence, but any 
earnest student should be able to complete the work for a Master's 
degree in four successive Summer Sessions by doing some outside 
work. 

Fees. The single Summer Session fee of $5.00 for each half of 
six weeks, covers work in all courses with the exceptions of the 
Music Department. The fee for less than the full time is $1.00 a 
week, with $2.00 as a minimum. Any laboratory fees are indicated 
in connection with the descriptions of the courses. In the Rural 
and Grade Teachers' Course tuition is free. No fee is charged for 
attendance at the Rural Life Conference. 

Room and Board. Room and board is available in private homes 
and at the college dormitories at prices which are customary 
throughout Iowa. The cafe in Alumni Hall will be open during the 
entire Summer Session. 

Women will be required to arrange for room through the regu- 
lar college committee of which Mrs. Emily Cunningham is chair- 
man. The college dormitories will be open for women students for 
board and room. A uniform rate of $5.00 a week will be charged 
for board and room in the dormitories where two occupy the same 
room. After the dormitories are filled Mrs. Cunningham will assign 
women to selected houses about the campus, where the regular 
college rules as to chaperons will be enforced during the session. 
Advanced arrangement for room is desirable. In the dormitories 
and private homes alike, mattresses only are furnished for the cots, 
BO that students should bring a pillow, sheets, pillow cases, and an 
extra blanket. 






Women rooming in private homes may secure board at the college 
dormitory dining rooms at the regular rate. 

Rooms for men will be available in private homes and rooming 
houses about the campus. A competent committee will be in charge. 
Mr. J. P. Clyde, Secretary of the Y. M. C. A., has agreed to take over 
this work for the coming Summer Session, and give it the same 
thorough attention which it receives during the regular college 
year. Prices for private rooms for the Summer Session range 
around $1.50 per week for each occupant. Usually this means 
two in a room. 

Expenses. Expenses will vary with the individual. For six 
weeks the expenses need not exceed $40 or $45, in addition to car 
fare. This makes provision for tuition, $5.00; room and board for 
six weeks, $30.00; books and laundry, $5.00, and other incidentals. 

Certificates. Students satisfactorily completing any of the gen- 
eral courses offered in the six weeks' Summer Session will, upon re- 
quest, be given a certificate showing attendance and grades. Most 
teachers will desire that attendance count toward the satisfaction 
of the recent law requiring twelve weeks of professional training, 
or the law giving certain credits for attendance at a six weeks' 
Summer Session. Such teachers will be fully advised as to the law, 
and certificate will be furnished accordingly. 

The Rural and Grade Teachers' Course is so arranged that it 
may be pursued with profit for four successive Summer Sessions. 
At the completion of the course special certificate may be given. 
Statement as to college credit work will be furnished by the Regis- 
trar. 

Teachers' Examination. The State Teachers' examination for 
June and July will be held at the college during the Summer Ses- 
sion for the convenience of teaefiers in attendance. One expecting 
to take an examination at the college should bring with him a 
statement from the county superintendent which will admit to the 
examination. It is also advised that the fee be paid to the county 
superintendent although where such fee has not been previously 
paid it will be collected and forwarded to the county superintendent. 

The Appointment Committee. In order to better serve the 
schools of the state, the faculty has provided a regular Appoint- 
ment Committee, the duties of which are to assist the students of 
the College who desire to enter educational work in finding the 
positions for which they are best fitted, and to aid school officials 
in finding the teachers, principals, supervisors and superintendents 
best prepared for the positions to be filled. Students of the Sum- 
mer Session who intend to teach or wish to better their positions, 
are invited to register with this committee. Blanks which are 
provided for that purpose may be secured by calling at the office of 
the Director of the Summer Session, room 318 Agricultural Hall. 
No fee is charged for the services of this committee. 

Chapel. Chapel services are held Tuesday of each week from 
7:40 to 8:00 o'clock A. M. This is more or less in the nature of a 
convocation, as well as a chapel service, and furnishes opportunity 
for announcements or for brief remarks upon subjects of immed- 
iate interest. 

Students' Mail. Students will avoid inconvenience by having 
their mail addressed, temporarily at least, to Station A, Ames, 



— 8- 



Iowa. This postoffice is located upon the College campus, and mail 
may be called for conveniently. 

Summer Employment. Students coming for the short Summer 
Session are not advised to seek employment but to give their full 
time to school work. This is particularly urged in the case of 
teachers desiring to meet the requirements of the State Education- 
al Board of Examiners with reference to normal training or the 
three points on salary or who desire to take the new subjects (Agri- 
culture, Home Economics, and Manual Training) and have the 
grades in these subjects transferred direct to the certificate. 

There are usually s.hig summer calls for help. Students may 
learn of these calls through Mr. J. P. Clyde, Secretary of the Y. M. 
C. A. 

Excursions. A number of excursions are arranged during the 
Summer Session under the direction of a regular committee. So far 
as possible these are scheduled for Saturday, so as to give all stu- 
dents in the general courses, at least, an opportunity to take ad- 
vantage of them. 

Recreation. While the primary object of the Summer Session 
is work and study, yet these will be facilitated by a sufficient 
amount of recreation. Students are uiged to effect organizations 
and to arrange for tournaments in tennis, baseball, track, or indoor 
work. The Committee on Games and Recreation will encourage and 
help in organizing the details of this work. Play hour, 7 to 9 
Friday evenings. 

Women who are beginners in tennis will be given instruction 
in the game by the director of physical culture for women on the 
Margaret Hall Courts. 











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Tenting Privilege. The 

extended for the first I Ime 



privilege of tenting in the north woods 
last summer received such hearty praise 



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from those participating that the privilege will be further extended 
this summer. There is no charge for tenting space but at present 
the space is limited. It will be well to arrange in advance for the 
privilege. Tents may be brought along or rented of tenting com- 
panies. One company in Des Moines makes a price of $5 for six 
weeks for a 10 foot by 12 foot tent. 

The gentleman whose tent appears in the cut on page eight wrote 
with reference to his experience as follows: 

"To my mind it is the ideal way to enjoy the summer session. 
Nearly every school man would like to spend a few weeks camping 
each summer but either feels he cannot spare the time or is oblig- 
ed to sacrifice the outing in order to attend summer school where 
the privilege is not offered. But if he may do as we did this sum- 
mer, combine the outing with his summer session work he can en- 
joy both much better. He does not need to feel that he is sacri- 
ficing time and he has the satisfaction of knowing that this will 
give him an outing and a chance to give his family an outing and 
enjoy it with them. It surely appeals to me and I should like now 
to reserve the right for next summer if it is extended. 

"With regard to expense, I kept account of my expenses for board 
and the average was $2.34 per week. This included several meals 
at the club or down town which generally cost $.35 or $.40. I be- 
lieve that if there were a family of three the expense for board need 
not be over $2.00 per week." 

Special Features. One feature of the Summer Session which is 
particularly worth while is the opportunity to hear educators of 
national reputation. The students last year who heard Commission- 
er Claxton of the National Bureau of Education, Dr. Jones of the 
University of South Dakota, Miss Carney or Dr. Foght, appreciated 
the opportunity which the Summer Session brought them in these 
speakers. This year there will be equal opportunity of hearing 
educators of note. The policy is to select a limited number of men 
of national reputation, whose addresses no one can afford to miss. 

Shakesparean Festival. On Monday, July 12th, the Ben Greet 
Woodland Players of national fame, will give a matinee and even- 
ing performance on the college campus. Ben Greet, himself, will 
be in the caste. The program as at present planned will be as fol- 
lows: 

Afternoon matinee, "Comedy of Errors." 

Evening performance, "Mid Summer Night's Dream." 

The charge will be reasonable and the announcement of this 
festival is made with confidence that it will be appreciated by the 
Summer School students. 

Vocational Education and Vocational Guidance. Special lectures 
in this line presented last summer by Mrs. Anna L. Burdick, Voca- 
tional Supervisor of the Des Moines schools, were so successful that 
a regular course in vocational education and vocational guidance 
will be offered during the summer of 1915. This course will be 
found under college credit courses. 

The whole trend of legislation and of educational thought during 
the last few years has been tovrard an increased attention to voca- 
tional and industrial education. It is worth much in this connection 
to have an opportunity to hear from one who can speak with author- 
ity. 



10— 



Lower Grades in the Model School. 

The Model School. The popular, two-room, consolidated Model 
School will be continued, in charge of competent critic teachers. 
Regular work in observation and methods will be offered for stu- 
dents in the general courses, and the work of the model school will 
be used in the regular college courses in agricultural education. 
Courses offered in Agricultural Education will include Principles 
and Methods of Education, Secondary Education, and School Ad- 
ministration. This will enable us to serve directly the rural teacher, 
the grade teacher, the agricultural high school teacher, and the 
school administrator. While all of these courses are standard col- 
lege courses, the emphasis is placed upon the development of agri- 
cultural and industrial subjects in the school curriculum. 

The Model School will be used for observation and demonstration 
purposes in connection with the work in didactics in the Rural and 
Grade Teachers' Course. It is planned to carry out fully the maxi- 
mum requirements of the State Educational Board of Examiners 
with reference to observation and demonstration. Students desiring 
extra opportunities for observation are asked to secure permission 
in advance. 

Library. The Library of the Iowa State College will be open for 
the use of Summer Session students. The Library consists of 45,000 
volumes well distributed among the various departments, and pro- 
viding a great deal of general matter in addition to the technical 
works required by the various divisions. 

The Library is well supplied with periodicals and dailies. The 
number of magazines and periodicals is fully 500. There are 18 
dailies, and about 150 local papers from different parts of Iowa. 
There are papers from every county in Iowa. Personal assistance 
will be given by the librarian and her assistants to any who desire 
help in reference work. 

The Agricultural Library in the Hall of Agriculture is supplied 
with the best books, bulletins, reports and agricultural papers and 
will be at the disposal of Summer School students both as a consult- 
ing and reading room. No fee is charged for the use of the reading 
rooms and the Library. 

Equipment. The College grounds and farms contain over 1,400 
acres. The larger portion is used for experimental farms, including 



-li- 



the dairy, poultry and soil experiment farms. About 200 acres is 
set apart as a campus, upon which is located the buildings used for 
instruction, administration, and residential purposes. Here also are 
the various athletic fields. The natural beauty of the campus is en- 
hanced by the many driveways and walks, by carefully arranged 
shrubs and trees, and by artistic landscape gardening. 

Thirty-six commodious buildings have been erected by the state 
for the exclusive use of the various departments of the College, 
besides the dwelling houses and the buildings for farm stock, 
machinery, and workshops. All of these buildings are lighted by 
electricity and supplied with pure water. 

One who has never made a trip to the Iowa State College will be 
surprised at the extensive and superior equipment. This is all im- 
mediately serviceable in teaching the industrial subjects, and in pre- 
paring teachers to meet the requirements of the new legislation. 
The teachers of the state are entitled to the use of this equipment. 
The Summer Session offers the opportunity. The following is a 
brief detail of some of the features of the equipment which will be 
of more immediate service during the Summer Session. 

In the farm department, the College has 750 head of livestock, 
with a total value of $49,000. Much of this is high grade show 
stock. There is a modern demonstration poultry farm of twenty 
acres, complete in all of its appointments, and this especially ap- 
peals to the Summer Session teachers, because all teachers, men and 
women alike, can take an active interest in poultry, and can be 
expected to teach it successfully in the schools. There is a dairy 
herd of 53 cattle on a farm of two hundred acres. There is a modern 
dairy products manufacturing plant valued at $100,000. The soil 
and farm crop experiment plots occupy sixty acres. These are used 
directly in the Summer Session work, and show as nothing else 
could show the opportunities for agricultural work among the 
farmers. In fact, the leading educators of the state are urging 
that every consolidated school, at least, should have a school farm 
devoted to experimental and demonstration work. The Agricultural 
Engineering Department, which offers courses during the Summer 
Session, has fully $25,000 worth of farm machinery with demon- 
stration opportunities. The Horticultural Department has a thor- 
oughly equipped greenhouse under ten thousand feet of glass, and 
forty acres in orchards and truck crops. The Summer Session 
courses offered by the Horticultural Department plan to make 
abundant use of their equipment. The manual training work, which 
for the Summer Session is organized under the direction of a man- 
ual training instructor who has for a number of years been conduct- 
ing such work in a large public school, has abundant facilities in 
the manual training shops in the Engineering Department of the 
College. An entire building, new and modern, is available for the 
work in home economics. 

Location. Ames is almost at the geographical center of the state 
of Iowa, on the main line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad. 
It is about thirty-five miles north of Des Moines, with which it is 
connected by a branch line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad 
and by the Fort Dodge, Des Moines and Southern (interurban) run- 
ning from Fort Dodge and Rockwell City to Des Moines. A branch 
of the Chicago & Northwestern from Ames penetrates the northern 
part of the state. Ames is proverbially a clean town, saloons and 
billiard halls being unheard of. 



— 12- 



The College is over a mile out but is connected by an electric car 
line, with frequent service and five-cent fare. 

The College Campus is said by those who have traveled much to 
be the most beautiful one in the United States. A gentleman, him- 
self a college president, who had visited all of the great colleges 
in America and many in Europe, said its buildings and campus were 
unequalled. June is one of the best months in the year to enjoy its 
tranquil splendors. 

Students should plan to arrive on Saturday or Monday. In case 
it is absolutely necessary to arrive on Sunday, advanced notice 
should be given, with the request that rooms be arranged for, at 
least temporarily. In case of arrival on Sunday, without advanced 
notice, phone 652, the residence phone of the Director of the Sum- 
mer Session. 




A Rural Lift 



Rural Life Conference. The Rural Life Conference will open on 
Monday, June 21st, and continue for two weeks, closing Friday 
evening, July 2nd. In the past this conference has been most help- 
ful to Iowa and neighboring states in stimulating and developing 
rural leadership. Unusual talent has been secured for 1915. The 
following leaders in Rural, Religious, and Educational thought will 
be present during all or part of the two weeks. 

Mr. Claire S. Adams, field assistant to the board of Home Mis- 
sions to the Presbyterian Church in the United States, will be pres- 
ent during the entire two weeks. Mr. Adams is well known in Iowa 
and the announcement of his name will elicit general interest. 

Mr. E. B. Turner, Bible Extension Professor of the Bible Training 
School of New York City. 

Dr. Harold II. Foght, Rural School Specialist of the National 
Bureau or Education. 

Mr. X. C. MacDonald, State Inspector of Consolidated Schools of 
North Dakota. 

Other speakers or note from the (-oiio^e and the state. 






■13 — 



The lectures in the Rural Life Conference are free to Summer 
Session students as well as members of the Conference. I^or special 
bulletin giving detailed program of the Conference, write Dean 
Chas. F. Curtiss, Chairman of the Rural Life Conference Committee, 
or to the Director of the Summer Session. 

COLLEGE EXTENSION 
Six Lectures. Teachers and others attending the Summer Session 
will be interested in an opportunity of hearing from leaders in the 
extension department on different phases of the extension work. 
This oportunity will be offered during the first half of the Summer 
Session and the following schedule has been arranged by Director 
Bliss: 

1. Agricultural Extension Work — Its Object and Purpose — R. 
K. Bliss. 

2. Demonstration in Canning — E. C. Bishop. 

3. Boys' and Girls' Club Work — Kate Logan. 

4. Correspondence Courses in Agriculture as an Aid in Prepar- 
ing to Teach Agricultural Subjects — P. C. Taff. 

5. Short Courses or Movable Schools — R. F. O'Donnell. 

6. County Agricultural Agent — Work and What We Can Do To 
Assist Rural Teachers — J. W. Coverdale. 

These lectures will be given in Room 117, Agricultural Hall, at 
5 o'clock each Wednesday evening during the first six weeks. Stu- 
dents are urged to improve this opportunity of getting a better idea 
of the great modern movement of "carrying the school to the 
people." 



LEGAL PROVISIONS OF INTEREST TO 
TEACHERS 

A large part of the work offered in the Summer Session is offer- 
ed in direct response to recent legislation. Work is arranged to 
meet legal requirements. 

Some recent legislation of interest to teachers is here inserted for 
their information. 

1. State Aided High Schools. According to section 2 6 34 of the 
Iowa School Law, provision is made for state aid amounting to $750 
per annum to high schools providing certain normal training for 
rural teachers, and offering among other subjects elementary agri- 
culture, home economics, and manual training. It is evident to all 
acquainted with the facts that better preparation on the part of 
teachers for handling the work in agriculture, home economics and 
manual training is most desirable in order to make the work in 
these selected high schools most effective. To supply these schools 
with teachers who have had four full years of college work in agri- 
culture and home economics is apparently impossible at the present 
time, aUhough a neighboring state is rapidly doing so. To meet the 
Iowa situation it will be necessary that teachers now in service avail 
themselves of every means to bring up their work in agriculture, 
heme economics and manual training. The Summer Session offers 
ore of the best opportunities. 

2. State Aided Consolidated Schools. The last General Assembly 
granted aid to consolidated schools, the amount varying from $450 



— 14 — 



to $1250 according to equipment. The law makes provision, how- 
ex er, for the teaching of agriculture, home economics, and other 
industrial and vocational subjects. To secure the state aid it is 
necessary that the schools employ "teachers holding certificates 
showing their qualifications to teach said subjects." 

3. Teaching Agriculture, Home Economics and Manual Training. 
Chapter 248 of the Acts of the last General Assembly makes pro- 
vision as follows: "The teaching of elementary agriculture, domes- 
tic science and manual training shall after the first day of July, 
1915, be required in the public schools of the state, * * * * 
and after the date aforesaid elementary agriculture and domestic 
science shall be included among the subjects required in the exam- 
ination of applicants for teachers' certificates. 

4. Twelve Weeks Normal Training. The law relating to the 
qualifications of teachers as passed by the last General Assembly 
makes provision that after July 1, 1915, applicants for teachers' 
certificates shall have had at least 12 weeks of normal training. 
This does not apply to the graduates of accredited colleges and to 
teachers who have had at least six months' successful teaching ex- 
perience. 

Two Summer Sessions of six weeks each will be considered as 
the equivalent of twelve weeks of continuous work. 

The State Educational Board of Examiners announces an exam- 
ination the last of August (25-26-27) for those completing twelve 
weeks of normal training this summer. 

The State Educational Board of Examiners limits the amount of 
work that may be carried to four subjects, one subject being assign- 
ed to education, except that penmanship, orthography, or physical 
training may be taken as a fifth subject. 

5. Six Weeks of Teacher Training for Credit of 3 Points on 
Salary. Section 2 of the Minimum Teachers' Wage Law provides 
that "every teacher holding either a second or a third grade certi- 
ficate who has taught successfully for one year and attended an ap- 
proved teachers' training school for a period of six weeks following 
shall receive a credit of 3 points in estimating the salary." 

The amount of work is limited to four subjects with the pro- 
visions indicated under section 4 above. 

The Summer Session of the Iowa State College gives teachers an 
opportunity to receive help directly in line with all of the legal 
provisions indicated above. The work is accredited for the twelve 
weeks normal training and for the six weeks of teacher training. 
Agriculture, home economics and manual training are the subjects 
in which the Iowa State College of all institutions is prepared to 
help teachers. 



—15— 



OFFICERS AND FACULTY 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

D. D. Murphy, President, Elkader. 
Gardiner Cowles, Des Moines. 

A. B. Funk, Spirit Lake. 

George T. Baker, Davenport. 

Roger Leavitt, Cedar Falls. 

Charles R. Brenton, Dallas Center. 

P. K. Holbrook, Onawa. 

Edward P. Schoentgen, Council Bluffs. 

Henry M. Eicher, Washington. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 
W. R. Boyd, President, Cedar Rapids. 
Thomas Lambert, Sabula. 
W. H. Gemmill, Secretary, Des Moines. 

AUDITOR AND INSPECTORS 
Jackson W. Bowdish, Auditor and Accountant, Des Moines. 
P. E. McClenahan, Inspector of Secondary Schools, Des Moines. 
John E. Foster, Assistant Inspector, Des Moines. 
L. I. Reed, Assistant Inspector, Des Moines. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 
Raymond A. Pearson, President, Central Building. 

E. W. Stanton, Vice-President, Central Building. 

G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session, Hall of Agriculture. 
Herman Knapp, Treasurer and Registrar, Central Building. 

SUMMER SESSION COUNCIL 
Raymond A. Pearson, President. 
C. F. Curtiss, Dean of Agriculture. 
A. Marston, Dean of Division of Engineering. 
R. E. Buchanan, Acting Dean, Division of Science. 
Catherine J. MacKay, Acting Dean of Division of Home Economics. 
G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session, Hall of Agriculture. 



PROFESSORS 



Robert Earle Buchanan 
Orange Howard Cessna 
Winfred Forest Coover 
Jules Cool Cunningham 
J. B. Davidson 
Catherine J. MacKay 
Gilmour Beyers MacDonald 
Martin Mortensen 
H. B. Munger 
Louis Hermann Pammel 
William Harper Pew 
Louis Bevier Spinney 
William Henry Stevenson 
George Melvin Turpin 
G. M. Wilson 



Bacteriology 

Psychology 

Chemistry 

General Agriculture 

Agricultural Engineering 

Home Economics 

Horticulture 

Dairy 

Farm Management 

Botany 

Animal Husbandry 

Physics 

Soils 

Poultry 

Agricultural Education 



—16- 



ASSOCIATE 
Jaffrey Carl Harris 
William Ray Heckler 
Henry Herbert Kildee 
John Nathan Martin 
R. R. Renshaw 
Louis Bernard Schmidt 
L. A. Test 

George H. VonTungeln 
John Anderson Wilkinson 



PROFESSORS 

Music 

Farm Crops 

Animal Husbandry 

Botany 

Chemistry 

History 

Chemistry 

Economic Science 

Chemistry 



Iva Brandt 
Frank H. Culley 
Henry Louis Eichling 
John Ise 
Max Levine 
Clyde McKee 
Frederick L. Overly 
Roy Eugene Smith 
Grace Schermerhorn 
George Waddel Snedecor 
Herbert John Plagge 
Winifred Tilden 
T. F. Vance 
Henry William Vaughn 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Home Economics 

Horticulture 

General Agriculture 

Economic Science 

Bacteriology 

Farm Crops 

Horticulture 

Soils 

Agricultural Education 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Physical Education 

Psychology 

Animal Husbandry 



Genevieve Fisher 
Peter Hanson 
Annie H. Hawks 
Edward E. Isaac 
Agnes Gina Mosher 
H. W. Richey 
Bertha May Wood Riley 
I). Harold Zentmire 
Lora Thompson 



INSTRUCTORS 

Home Economics 
Farm Crops 
Home Economics 
Horticulture 
Mathematics 
Horticulture 
Home Economics 
General Agriculture 
Home Economics 



Jaffrey Carl Harris 
Mrs. J. C. Harris 



Amy W. Noll 
Gladys Rush 



c. E. Applegate 

.1. \\\ Bowen 

T, B. Kirkpatrick 

C. i'.. Wilson 
if. B, Kinney 

\v. C. Lot I 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



LIBRARY 



ABORATORY ASSISTANTS 

General Agriculture 

Chemistry 

Physics 

General Agriculture 

Soils 

General Agriculture 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTORS 
E. S. Baird Manual Training 

Supervisor of Manual Training, Newton, Iowa, 



—17— 



.Mary Brady Home Economics 

State Normal School, Stevens Point, Wis. 
\V. A. Brindley Civics 

High School Teacher, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 
Anna L. Burdick Vocational Education 

Director Vocational Guidance, Des Moines City Schools. 
George S. Counts Agricultural Education 

Chicago University. 
Luella Chapman Writing 

Supervisor of Writing in Marshalltown, Iowa, Schools. 
R. K. Farrar Manual Training 

Extension Professor, Agricultural Education. 
Iva Ferree Special Methods 

Supervisor Practice Training, Mich. State Normal, Kalamazoo. 
Rose L. Gouldin English 

Principal High School, Oelwein, Iowa. 
Marion Grawe Manual Training 

Supervisor of Manual Training, Atlantic, Iowa. 
W. T. Giese Manual Training 

Supervisor of Manual Training, Ames Public Schools. 
Johanna M. Hansen Domestic Art 

Supervisor of Art Instruction, Sioux City Public Schools. 
F. W. Hicks Education 

Superintendent of Schools, Ames, Iowa. 
Selma Konold Music 

Music Supervisor, Millvale, Pa. 
Kramer J. Hoke Agricultural Education 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Richmond, Pa. 
Mabel Kingsbury Home Economics 

Domestic Science Supervisor, Dallas Center, Iowa. 
A. P. Laughlin Manual Training 

Supervisor Manual Training, Peoria, 111. 
Pearl McCaslin Arithmetic 

Special Teacher of Arithmetic, Connersville, Ind. 
Wylle B. McNeal Home Economics 

Chicago University. 
J. E. Moore Manual Training 

Superintendent of Schools, Spring Valley, Minn. 
Sylvia A. Miller Home Economics 

Chicago University. 
X. C. Pervier Manual Training 

Supervisor Manual Training, Mountain Lake, Minn. 
F. P. Reed U. S. History 

Superintendent of Schools, Osceola, Iowa. 
Or? K. Smith Geography and Physiology 

Head of Normal Department, Albert Lea, Minn. 
Bertha C. Stiles Primary Critic Teacher 

Primary Supervisor, Hibbing, Minn. 
Anna Tjaden Manual Training 

Assistant Superintendent Manual Training, Peoria, 111. 
Mary Vaughn Home Economics 

Domestic Science Supervisor, Perry, Iowa. 
Florence V. Watkins Agricultural Education 

Principal Froebel Academy, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



— 18- 



GENERAL COURSES 

Heretofore, general courses of brief and summary nature havo 
been offered for high school teachers in such a way as to cover in 
six weeks the entire field of agriculture. This general course 
served a useful purpose for high school teachers when the require- 
ments of the law were first put upon us. The present demand, 
however, is for more thorough work such as can be secured in the 
college credit courses. The requirements of superintendents and 
school officials are in line with this same tendency, the general 
practice at present being to require a minimum of college credit 
work in agriculture to meet the requirements for the preparation 
of teachers of the subject. In view of this fact, the introductory 
courses in animal husbandry, farm crops, agricultural engineering, 
dairying, horticulture and poultry work have been so arranged as 
to avoid conflict with each other and so make possible the free 
election of introductory courses in so far as the time allotment will 
permit. This plan worked out so well last summer that the gen- 
eral course for high school teachers was discontinued, teachers 
electing instead college credit courses in the various lines. In 
planning the 1915 schedule the effort has been made to continue the 
introductory courses without conflict and to in like manner arrange 
continuation courses with as little conflict as possible. 

The general courses are retained for rural and grade teachers 
and are extended this year to include 12 weeks of work. These 
courses are described under the rural and grade teachers course. 
General courses are also continued for farmers in agriculture, and 
for homemakers in home economics. 

GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

S-2. Agriculture. Each summer there have been a few farm- 
ers and business men and women desiring to get a general knowl- 
edge of the fundamentals of agriculture from the combined scien- 




Studying Corn. 

tlflc and practical point of view. The demands of such individuals 
vary so much that it is necessary to take up each case 
and arrange a schedule accordingly. While one will desire to de- 
vote his full time to a study of farm animals, another will desire all 
of his time on the study of soils or plants or orcharding. It has 
been found possible to meet these demands quite fully and to give 
a combination Of work which will enable each individual to get 
economically the practical information which he desires. Since 



-ID- 




Learning to Judge Corn. 

those asking for this particular course do not ask for college credit, 
they are given considerable freedom, the sole purpose being to 
meet their demand in a satisfactory way. It is suggested that in- 
dividuals knowing before hand that they will ask for this course 
write somewhat in detail the work which they desire. This will 
give an opportunity for consultation in arranging the course satis- 
factorily. 

HOMEMAKERS' COURSES 

The division of Home Economics will offer beginning and con- 
tinuation courses of a very practical nature for homemakers of the 
state who may desire to take advantage of the summer work. This 
work has always been very popular because of its intensely prac- 
tical nature and this summer it has been decided to offer all 
courses coordinately, that is, without any prerequisite require- 
ments. It will be further observed that some of these courses are 
arranged in such way as to devote two weeks to a particular sub- 
ject. This will make it possible for women from the home who 
can come only for two weeks to get a definite unit of work. The 
description of the homemakers' courses follows herewith: 

S-30. Dressmaking. Especially designed for women who 
wish to do home sewing. It will include the alteration and use of 
commercial patterns, pattern making, designing, copying good 
styles and garment making. Lectures will be given each week on 
costume, good and bad taste in dress, renovation, care of clothing, 
etc. A choice will be given in the garment to be made including 
underwear, blouses, tailored dress. 

S-31. Textiles, Millinery, Clothing. This course includes three 
separate courses. It is planned for students who are especially 
interested in some one line of work, and is arranged so that any 
one of the courses may be taken alone if desired. Two weeks each 
will be given to each of the following: 

1. Use of the dress form in home sewing. Work consists of 
padding and fitting up a form, and draping and modeling on 
the form. 



■20— 



2. Millinery. Demonstration and laboratory work on methods 

of making frames, trimming of hats and the making of 
flowers and bows. 

3. Textiles. Including a microscopic study of the textile fibers; 
development and growth of the textile industry; adultera- 
tions of textile fabrics; common weaves and familiarity 
with the names of the common material found on the mar- 
ket today. 

S-35. Cookery. This course is to be divided into three periods 
of two weeks each so that those who wish may take the full six 
weeks work or any one or two of the two weeks periods. 

The first period will include the cooking of meats and the pre- 
paration of appetizing dishes from left over meals. 
The second period the cooking of vegetables and cereals and 
methods of reheating these foods. 

The third period the making of quick breads, yeast breads, 
and the preparation of beverages. 
S-36. Cookery. Discussion of different types of table service 
including the preparation and serving of typical meals, illustrating 
suitable food combinations. Food adapted to the needs of children 
during different periods of growth will be considered as well as the 
preparation, selection and serving of foods for the sick. 

S-40. Home Problems. This course is designed for women who 
do not wish to enter for laboratory work but desire to secure in- 
formation along the lines of the latest developments in household 
problems, and who desire a scientific basis for home practices. Dis- 
cussions of selection, preparation and use of foods and clothing 
will be accompanied by demonstrations and illustrations. Provision 
will be made for informal discussion. School and public sanita- 
tion and hygiene as problems relating to the life and health of the 
family will be considered. Problems of the home, its plan, decora- 
tion, care and management will be considered and modern household 
appliances and conveniences illustrated or demonstrated. The 
lectures and discussions of the rural life conference will be open to 
women entered in this course. 

RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSE 

Tuition Free. 

(Students who are high school graduates may take college credit 
work upon payment of the fee). 

This course is offered to enable rural and grade teachers to have 
the advantages of the unusual facilities, of the Iowa State College 
in preparation for teaching agriculture, home economics, and man- 
ual training in the public schools in an intelligent and effective 
manner. The instruction will emphasize the elementary side of 
the subjects, giving particular attention to methods of preparing 
material, and of organizing the work in rural schools. The lab- 
oratories and teaching equipment of the college, including the lib- 
rary and the experiment farms, will be available to the students, 
but the aim throughout will be to so handle the work as to illus- 
trate the possibilities of doing the work effectively under rural 
school conditions. The primary object of the course is to give 
work in the industrial subjects to present and prospective teachers, 
and other work will he offered only when carried along with indus- 
trial work. 



— 21 — 



The work is arranged to meet legal requirements (see page 13.) 

Admission to this course requires graduation from the common 

schools and the recommendation of the county superintendent of 

schools. 

This course makes provision for the following work: 

1. General Agriculture S-3. This course is planned after con- 
sultation with the state department so as to meet the require- 
ments of teachers who are preparing to teach agriculture in the 
rural and grade schools. The course will deal with the phases of 
agriculture that can be taught to the best advantage in the rural 
schools and will consist of class, laboratory and demonstration 
work. Topics included in this beginning course of six weeks are 
soils and soil fertility, culture and improvement of crops, especial- 
ly of corn, seed corn selection, storing, testing, and judging, weeds 
and weed eradication, bacteria, fungi and insects, orchards and 
orcharding, gardening for home and school, the propagation of 
plants and related topics suitable for rural schools. 

2. General Agriculture S-4. This is a continuation of the 
course described in the paragraph above. Topics dealt with are 
farm animals, including horses, cattle, sheep and swine but with 
particular emphasis upon poultry. Poultry is considered by the 
state department and others as a topic particularly adapting itself 
for treatment in the rural and grade schools. The course will give 
the student a definite knowledge of the qualities to expect in good 
stock and will consider selection, improvement, care and manage- 
ment. Attention will also be given to dairying including the use of 
the Babcock test. 

3. Home Economics S-3 8. This is the introductory course for 
rural and grade teachers. The work will be done under conditions 
and with equipment that can be easily duplicated in the rural 
schools. For part of the work a specially devised rural school 




Home Economics Equipment for Rural Schools. 



—22— 



home economics cabinet will be used. The emphasis will be placed 
upon the planning of a suitable course of lessons, demonstration 
with the pupils of the model school as a class, lesson planning, 
cooperation with the home and necessary equipment. The purpose 
is to give the teacher a definite plan so that she will willingly carry 
out the work in her school next winter. 

4. Home Economics S-32. Sewing. This course carries for- 
ward the sewing work done in S-38 and is intended to give the 
teacher a more thorough knowledge of the subject. The emphasis 
will be upon plain sewing but help will be given upon the selection 
and use of materials, and the practical work of cutting, fitting, 
finishing and repairing of garments. 

5. Home Economics S-37. Cooking. This course is a contin- 
uation of the cooking work in S-38. It is intended to give a more 
thorough knowledge and is adapted throughout to the work in the 
rural schools. Subjects treated are food preparation, serving of 
meals, economical menus and other work according to the interest 
and ability of the class. The work in this course will be done in 
the regular college laboratories. 

6. General Manual Training S-6. The introductory course of 
six weeks in general manual training will deal with the rougher 
and more practical farm problems and includes such exercises as 
work bench, saw horse, bench hook, nail box, corn tray, bird house, 
hog trough, milking stool, bench vice, seed sample case, chicken 
biooder, etc. Because of the bulky nature of the models in the 




1912 Manual Training Group. 
exercises undertaken in this courss materials will be furnished 
without a fee and at the close oi' the course students will be given 
an option to purchase the models at actual cost of material. 

7. Genera] Manual Training S-7. This will be a continuation of 
general manual training S6 but will deal more particularly with 
farm home problems. The exercises will require more refined 
work and a higher degree of finish and will include the necessary 
basis in drawings and reading of the same. The following are 
Borne of the exercises which will be undertaken. Book rack, plant 
-land, waste basket, medicine case, hall tree, porch swing, bulle- 
tin case, screen, small step ladder, sleeve board, fly trap, etc. The 
work will be accompanied by readings, lectures and demonstra- 
tions. Double period daily. 

NOTE: Teachers will \,<- interested in knowing <>r the rutins of the state 
educational board of examiru-rs to the effect that grades in agriculture, home 
economics, and manual training when carried successfully for 12 weeks may 
i.< transferred direel to the certificate without further examination" 



—23 — 



Home economics students are requested to wear wash dresses in the 
cooking laboratories. White aprons, hand towels and holders will also be 
required. 

S. Manual Training S-14. .Art and Light Metal- Work. Models 
and tool processes will be selected from the standpoint of their 
service to public school teachers. Among the tool processes taught 
will be etching, boring, sawing, cutting with file and chisel, upset- 
ting, bending, planishing, hardening, tempering, annealing, fasten- 




1914 Manual Training- Group. More than twice as many men and some 

women. 



ing with rivets, bolts, screws, soldering, brazing, coloring and lac- 
quering. A special feature of the work will be a design of all pro- 
cesses made. 

9. Manual Training, S-15. Basketry and Weaving. The work 
in this course carries a double purpose; first, to give ability in or- 
ganizing such work for the lower grades in school, and, second, to 
give actual practice in performing processes that are useful in the 
school and that are personally useful to the individual. 

10. Other Certificate Subjects. Other subjects for rural and 
grade teachers as required for the first grade certificate will be 
available in this course only when taken along with industrial sub- 
jects. All subjects will be taught by competent teachers. 

In handling the work of the common branches the effort is to 
give a good pedagogical view of each subject, thus meeting fully 
the requirements of the State Educational Board of Examiners 
with reference to these subjects. The courses are not review 
courses and yet experience indicates that the type of work given is 
the best review, even for examination, as it gives a good compre- 
hensive teachers view of any particular subject. 

For lack of space description of the other certificate subjects are 
not given herewith but there is no hesitation in announcing that 
the work in each subject is on a thoroughly progressive and helpful 
basis. 

Work is offered in algebra, arithmetic, civics, drawing, econom- 
ics, education (didactics), geography, history, music, orthography, 
penmanship, physics, physical training, reading, and writing. 

While provision is made for work in all of the subjects required 
for first grade certificate in addition to agriculture, home econom- 
ics and manual training, teacI'.TS who enter upon work in this 
course are urged to make a schedule which will enable them to 




A S 



follow up the work to advantage in successive summer sessions. 

The following grouping of subjects is suggested on a basis of 
successive Summer Sessions. 



General Agriculture 

Arillimetic 

Gen. Home Economics 

Penmanship or Drawing 

Didactics I 

2 
I ooking 

phy or History 
Reading 
< >rthography 
Economics 



General Agriculture 

Manual Training 

Sewing 

Algebra or Civics 



M.i iMi.-i 1 'i raining 
Physiology or I 
Didactics II or 
I 'hysics 
Physical Culture 



Primary Methods ill 



Any student pursuing this work in such consecutive manner will 
be given Bpecial certificate showing the same. The teacher in ser- 
vice who is sufficiently Interested to follow up her schooling in such 

tematic fashion should receive proper recognition. 

Rural and grade teachers coming for a single Summer Session 
are urged to talce advantage, of all Of the industrial work that it 
is possible to get In the course A teacher may meet the six weeks 
and twelve wo<i<s requirements (see legal requirements, page 13.) 




niroup. 



and still give very nearly all of the time to agriculture, home eco- 
nomics and manual training. Education must be taken to meet 
the requirements of the law, but that leaves a possibility of three- 
fourths of the time on industrial subjects. However, it may be 
better for a particular teacher to put some of the time on other 
subjects, as arithmetic, English, etc. The course is arranged to 
meet this need. 

Primary Methods. For primary and lower grade teachers there 
is offered a course in primary methods which may be taken in- 
stead of the regular course in didactics offered for the second six 
weeks of normal training. Rural teachers who have difficulty with 
primary work will find this course advantageous. It will deal 
particularly with primary reading, busy work and special problems 
of the primary teacher. Observation opportunities in the model 
school are offered with this work. 

Fees in General Courses. The courses in industrial subjects 
necessarily require laboratory work and the use of materials. It is 
customary for students to pay the actual cost of materials used. 
This is not a loss to the student, for in many cases the finished pro- 
duct is worth much more than the cost of materials. This is parti- 
cularly true in manual training and sewing. The fees are there- 



26 



fore in the nature of deposits to pay for material actually used. An 
exception to the rule is made in connection with the beginning 
course in manual training for rural and grade teachers. No fee is 
charged; the completed models become the property of the college, 
but may be taken by student on payment of the cost of the mater- 
ials used. This exception is made because of the size of the models, 
their practical character and the possibility that some students may 
not be able to take their models to their homes or schools. 

For the different general courses the fees have been estimated 
as follows: 

Agriculture S-2 — No fee. 

General Agriculture S-3 — Fee 25c. 

General Agriculture S-4 — Fee 25c. 

Home Economics S-30 — Fee $1.00. 

Home Economics S-31 — Fee $1.00. 

Home Economics S-32 — Fee $1.00. 

Home Economics S-3 5 — Fee $3.00. 

Home Economics S-36 — Fee $3.00. 

Home Economics S-37 — Fee $3.00. 

Home Economics S-38 — Fee $1.00. 

Home Economics S-40 — Fee $2.00. 

General Manual Training S-6 — No fee. 

General Manual Training S-7 — Deposit $2.00. 

General Manual Training S-14 — Deposit $2.00. 

General Manual Training S-15 — Deposit $2.00. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 

There are many who wish to take some of the regular college 
courses either because of the intrinsic value of the work to them in 
a practical way or as a part of a regular college course to be com- 
pleted later. 

The courses described below are the same as those offered during 
the college year and will be taught by the regular college faculty. 
The descriptions are quoted from the regular College Catalog. 

As the Summer Session is approximately one third the length of 
a college semester, the number of hours per week devoted to a 
course in the Summer Session will be three times what is shown in 
the descriptions below. Six hours per week constitutes full work 
in these college courses. There is little doubt but that the num- 
bers in each course will justify offering it. 

A resolution adopted by the Iowa Council of Education a year 
ago last November indicated about thirty-two hours of technical 
agriculture of a college grade as the minimum for a regular teacher 
of agriculture in the high school. This amount of work will easily 
be secured in successive Summer Sessions. The work in agricul- 
ture offered during the summer of 1915, includes twenty-seven 
courses, with a total of 57 credit hours. The prospective student 
who is looking forward to several Summer Sessions in succession 
is advised to plan his work so as to cover the field in a reasonable 
manner and meet the minimum requirements as suggested by the 
Iowa Council of Education. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

1. General Principles of Teaching. A fundamental course deal- 
ing with general principles underlying instruction; class-room 
management and method; the technique of the recitation; types 



-27— 



of lessons and the standards for judging the same; the selection 
and organization of subject-matter; the bases for readjusting the 
curriculum to make room for new types of school work; efficiency 
in the management of the study period. Recitations, 3; credit 3. 

2. General Principles of Teaching. Recitations 3; credit 3. 

3. Principles of Secondary Education. The sources and devel- 
opment of the high school curriculum. The best present day high 
school practice. The organization and management of the high 
school. The pedagogical significance of the adolescent period. 
Secondary instruction and methods. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

4. Principles of Secondary Education. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

5. Educational History. The history of education with refer- 
ence to its bearing upon the solution of present educational prob- 
lems, especially problems of industrial and vocational education. 
It is a redirected study designed to be of real value to our students. 
Recitations 2; credit 2. 

7. Vocational Education. The course will deal with the de- 
velopment of and the present day best practices with reference to 
vocational education, pre-vocational education, and vocational 
guidance. This course will be in charge of Mrs. Anna L. Burdick 
of Des Moines, who will use in it her masterful analysis of Iowa 
conditions. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

10. School Administration. Measurement as a modern scien- 
tific instrument of supervision and administration. During the 
summer of 1915, the work will be the measurement of mental abil- 
ity of children and of achievement in subject-matter. Recitations 
2; credit 2. 

lla-12a. Home Economics Education. Special methods. Modi- 
fied course for summer students. See Home Economics 9a-10a. 
The practice teaching required with the regular course may be com- 
pleted in the rgeular year. Completed course counts as education 
when prerequisites are met. Recitations 4; credit 4. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

5. Farm Machinery and Farm Motors. Mechanics and mater- 
ials; the measurement and transmission of power; development, 
construction, functions and methods of operating, adjusting and 
repairing farm machinery and farm motors; the principles of 
draft and the production of power. Laboratory work is devoted 
to the study of construction, operation, adjustment and testing of 
machines discussed in the class room. Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr. ; 
credit 2 2-3; fee $2.00. 

19. Rural Sanitation. The lighting, heating and ventilation of 
farm buildings. Sanitary construction, plumbing, systems of water 
supply and sewage disposal. Recitation 1; credit 1. 

21. Cement Construction. The use of cement in farm buildings 
construction. Cement testing; study mixtures; construction of forms, 
reinforcements. Also other building materials. Recitation and 
lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 1; fee $2.00. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

1. Market Types of Cattle and Sheep. Judging of different 
market classes of beef cattle, and mutton and wool, sheep. Recita- 
tion 1; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $2.00. 

2. Market Types of Dairy Cattle, Horses and Swine. Judging 
different market classes of dairy cattle, light and heavy horses, and 



— 2 8- 



( bacon and fat) swine. Recitation 1; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee 
$2.00. 

3. Breed Types of Cattle and Sheep. Judging representatives 
of different breeds according to their official standards; a study of 
their origin, history, characteristics, and adaptability to different 
conditions of climate and soil. Prerequisite 1; recitations 2; labs. 
2, 2 hr.; credit 3 1-3; fee $2.00. 

4. Breed Types of Dairy Cattle, Horses and Swine. Judging of 
representatives of different breeds according to their official stan- 
dards, a study of their origin, history, characteristics, and adaptab- 
ility to different conditions of climate and soil. Prerequisite 2; 
recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3 1-3; fee $2.00. 

~20. Animal Feeding. Composition and digestibility of feeding 
stuffs; the preparation of coarse fodders; the grinding, steaming 
and cooking of feeding stuffs; feeding standards and calculation of 
rations; feeding for meat, milk, wool, growth and work. Prere- 
quisites, Chem. 6 8 or 25; recitations 2; credit 2. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

1. General Bacteriology. Morphology, classification, physiology, 
and cultivation of bacteria, relation of bacteria to health of man 
and animals, to infection, contagion, immunity, and to other scien- 
tific and agricultural problems. Laboratory work on methods of 
cultivating bacteria and the study of bacterial functions and activi- 
ties, content of air, water, and food, with interpretation of results 
reached. Prerequisite, Organic Chemistry; recitations 2; labs. 3, 
2 hr.; credit 4; fee $5.00. 

15. General Bacteriology for Students in Animal Husbandry. 
A discussion of general bacteriology followed by study of the rela- 
tionship of bacteria to agriculture with particular reference to the 
live stock industry. Prerequisite, Chem. 2 51, recitations 2; lab. 
1, 2 hr.; credit 2 2-3; fee $4.00. 

18. General Bacteriology and Fermentations for Students in 
Home Economics. Bacteria in their relations to the home, includ- 
ing a brief consideration of the pathogenic forms and the bacteria, 
yeasts and molds in their zymotic activities. 

This course will prove of particular value to teachers of Home 
Economics, of Biology, or of Physiology in high schools. Such 
topics as the following are considered: The scientific basis for 
food preservation and canning, bacteria and yeasts useful in bread 
making, food fermentation, clean and dirty milk, bacteria that 






lifer 



Summer Session Students Judging Stock. 



—29 — 



cause diseases and how they are spread, etc. Prerequisite, organic 
chemistry; recitation 2; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3 1-3; fee $5.00. 

BOTANY 

It is the object of botany to make the student familiar with the 
common plants about him — weeds, trees and flowers. The summer 
months offer an exceptionally favorable time for such work. The 
Summer Session work is adapted to the needs of the high school 
teacher of the subject. 

15 and 70. Systematic Phanerogams. Flowering plants; his- 
torical survey of various systems of classification study of groups 
by means of some representatives. Some preliminary work on the 
Morphology of flowering plants is advisable. Credit 3 to 5; fee 
$3.00. 

60. Botany of Weeds. Injury to farm, garden and horticultural 
crops; origin and distribution of weeds. Some preliminary work 
on the morphology of flowering plants is advisable, though not 
necessary. Recitation 1; lab. 1, 2 hrs.; credit 1 2-3; fee $3.00. 

61. Morphology. Flowering plants with special reference to 
the organ, cells and tissues. Recitation 1; lab. 1, 2 hrs.; credit 
1 2-3; fee $2.00. 

CHEMISTRY 

103. General Chemistry. Principles and the non-metallic ele- 
ments. Recitations 3; lab. 1, 3hrs.; credit 4; deposit $6.00. 

104. General Chemistry. Continuation of 103. The more im- 
portant metallic elements and qualitative analysis. In the last half 
of the semester lectures will be given on special chemical subjects 
related to engineering problems. Recitations 2; labs. 2, 3 hrs.; 
credit 4; deposit $7.50. 

107. General Chemistry. The principles of general chemistry 
and the non-metals. of interest to students of agriculture are stud- 
ied. Recitations 3; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 4 1-3; deposit $6.00. 

108. General Chemistry. Continuation of 107. A brief study 
of the more important metals, found in the soil and their com- 
pounds. Qualitative analysis is taken up in the laboratory. Reci- 
tations 3; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 4 1-3; deposit $7.50. 

10 9. General Chemistry for Home Economics Students. Prin- 
ciples and the important non-metallic elements found in air, water 
and soil. Recitations 3; lab. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 4 1-3; deposit $6.00. 

110. General Chemistry. Continuation of 109. A brief study 
of the metals and their compounds which are of importance in every 
day life; qualitative analysis; compounds are analyzed which are of 
special interest to students of home economics. Recitations 3; labs. 
2, 2 hrs.; credit 4 1-3; deposit $7.50. 

351. Applied Organic Chemistry. Physical and chemical pro- 
perties and methods of preparation of important classes of carbon 
compounds; the composition of plant and animal bodies; the proxi- 
mate principles of foods and the chemical changes which occur 



-30- 



during digestion; assimilation and metabolism. Prerequisite 108; 
lectures 3; lab. 1, 2 hrs.; credit 3 2-3; deposit $6.00. 

352. Agricultural Analysis. Principles of gravimetric and volu- 
metric analysis; the analysis of milk, grain, and mill feeds and 
fodders. Prerequisite 351; lectures and recitations 2; labs. 2, ? 
hrs.; credit 3 1-3; deposit $7.50. 

375. Applied Organic Chemistry. Principles of Organic Chem- 
istry and their application to the related work in home economics; 
the chemistry of the carbohydrates, fats and proteins to prepare 
the student for physiological chemistry, the preparation of some 
typical organic bodies, folowed by work on the carbohydrates, fats 
and proteins. Credit 4 1-3 hours. Deposit $7.50. 

376. Food Chemistry. Elementary work in gravimetric and 
volumetric analysis; the analysis of milk, butter, oleomargarine, 
ice cream and cereal foods. Credit 5 hrs.; deposit $7.50. 

DAIRYING 

10. Domestic Dairying. Nutritive and economic value of milk; 
its dietetics and hygiene; market milk, infants' milk, invalids' 
milk, cream, ice cream, condensed milk, milk chocolates, malted 
milk, dried milk, fermented milks (Kephir, Koumissete), butter- 
milk, butter and cheese. Demonstrations are given in types of 
butter and cheese and in testing the purity of milk and butter. 
Lectures and labs. 2; credit 2 hrs.; fee $2.50. 

12. Farm Dairying. Secretion, composition, testing, separation 
and acidity of milk, preparation of starters, ripening of cream, 
churning and packing butter. Recitations 2, lab. 1, 2 hrs; credit 
2 2-3 hrs.; fee $3.00. 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE 

10. Agricultural Economics. Historical and comparative agri- 
cultural systems; land tenure, size of farms; co-operation; taxa- 
tion; prices; transportation; marketing; land credit; the relation 
of the state to agriculture. Recitations 3; credit 3. 

2 4. Rural Sociology. A course of special interest to teachers 
and superintendents. The means of development of country life by 
way of a rural reconstruction through adaptation of existing local 
institutions, and state and community activities. Rural population 
as to density, vital statistics, sanitation migration or the cityward 
trend, nationality, standard of living. Social institutions, such as 
the rural church, rural schools, clubs, libraries, facilities for enter- 
tainment, wider use of school and church plants, social centers, 
social surveys, with the possible improvement and extension. A 
comparison of country with city respecting the age, birth rate, 
longevity, race, marriage, divorce, education, moral character, vice, 
criminality, the need for specialized leadership or willingness on 
the part of certain individuals to serve as leaders; public opinion; 
thrift and standard of living; economic, legal, poltical and social 
factors affecting the quantity and quality of the population. 8S. 
Recitations 3; credit 3. 

ENGLISH 

10. Narration and Description. Expository and suggestive 
description; better vocabulary through search for the specific word; 
simple and complex narrative, with incidental description; plot 
and characterization; securing interest, as well as clearness and 



— 31 — 

good order; analysis of good models. Themes almost daily, to 
train the student to apply the principles studied. Recitations 3 ; 
credit 3; fee 25 cents. 

11. Exposition. Principles and methods of expository writing; 
logical basis in definition and division; different types of exposi- 
tion, with study of models; careful attention to the construction 
of paragraphs and the making of plans and outlines; a short theme 
almost daily, with longer ones occasionally, constant emphasis on 
the application of the principles studied. Recitations 3; credit 3; 
fee 25 cents. 

FARM CROPS 

1. Corn Production. Structure and adaptation of the corn 
plant; methods of selecting, storing, testing, grading, planting, 
cultivating and harvesting. Cost of production, uses of the crop, 
commercial marketing, insects and diseases. Field study of corn 
with reference to per cent stand and correlation of the parts of the 
stalk. Laboratory study of the structure of the stalk, ear and ker- 
nel. Scoring and judging of single and ten ear samples. Recita- 
tions 2; lab. 1, 2 hrs; credit 2 2-3; fee $1.00. 

2. Small Grain Production. Oats, wheat (winter and spring) 
barley, rye, emmer, speltz; their botanical structure, soil and cli- 
matic adaptations, seed selection, seed bed preparation and seeding, 
harvesting, uses, insects and diseases. Laboratory study of plants 
of each small grain crop; scoring, judging, and market grading of 
the different grains. Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hrs; credit 2 2-3; 
fee $1.00. 

3. Corn and Small Grain Judging. Judging samples of the 
different varieties of corn and small grain, market grading, also a 
study of the origin, characteristics and adaptation of the standard 
grain varieties. Lab. 1, 2 hrs.; rec. and lab. 1, 2 hrs.; credit 2; 
fee $2.00. 




-32- 



17. Forage Crops. Study of grasses, legumes and other plants 
suitable for pasture, hay, silage and soiling. Botanical structure, 
soil and climatic adaptation, cultural and harvesting methods, and 
uses of the different forage plants. Identification of the plants, 
their seed and the common adulterants. Recitation 1; lab. 1, 2 
hrs; credit 2; fee $2.00. 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

8. Farm Management. Typical illustrations of the differing 
phases of specialized farming and of general farming; problems of 
labor, fencing and marketing methods employed by successful 
farmers. A practical and thorough study of a system of farm ac- 
counts. Actual field study of the laying out and conducting of 
farms; special exercises in planning of rotations, field locations and 
placing of buildings. Recitations 2; lab. and lecture 1; credit 3; 
fee $1.00. 

FORESTRY 

1. Farm Forestry. The place of forestry on the farm. Wind- 
breaks, shelterbelts, woodlots; best trees for planting for various 
farm purposes; the preservative treatment of fence posts. 

The place of forestry in the United States; the development in 
this line during the past few years, and the relation of forestry to 
other industries. Recitations 2; credit 2; fee $.50. 

HISTORY 
14. The West in American History. A study of the settlement 
and development of the west from 176 3 to the present time. The 
westward movement of population; sources, causes, line of advance, 
and areas of settlement; territorial acquisitions; methods by which 
the greater portion of the public domain has been disposed of by 




in the SHiooi Garden 






—33— 



the federal government; conditions of pioneer life; industrial de- 
velopment; growth of democracy; rise of new problems; develop- 
ment of new institutions; and the influences of the west on national 
development. Special attention will be given to the influences 
affecting the industrial development of the west; transportation, 
labor saving machinery, free homesteads, and foreign immigration. 
Students desiring credit in History 2 4 may take History 14 as a 
substitute. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

1. Sewing. Drafting of patterns and hand sewing, including 
stitches, darning, patching, the making of button holes, all of which 
will be applied to some useful garment. Recitation 1; lab. 2, 3 
hrs.; credit 2 1-3; fee $2.00. 

4. Sewing. Advanced drafting, hand and machine sewing, silk 
skirts, slips, or tailored skirts, and tailored waists. Economical 
cutting of material, fitting of garments, and choice of materials 
from the standpoint of economy and beauty. Prerequisite 1 ; recita- 
tion 1; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 2 1-3; fee $2.00. 

9a-10a. Special Methods. A study of Home Economics as 
taught in the grades and high school — different courses, content of 
each, relation to each other and to other subject in the curriclum. 
Educational methods applied to Home Economics teaching. A study 
of typical courses throughout the United States and the making of 
courses for given situations. A comparative study of text books; 
equipment; demonstrative material; exhibits; the school lunch 
problem; the Home Economics teacher. Recitation 4; credit 4. 

4 3. Food Preparation. In its scientific and economic aspect. 
Nutritive principles and the methods of cooking foods to retain them 
in digestible form; serving of foods in simple and attractive form. 
Economy of money, time and labor. Prerequisite Chemistry 109; 
recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 2 1-3; fee $4.00. 

4 4. Food Preparation. Prerequisite 43; Recitation 1; labs. 2, 
2 hrs.; credit 2 1-3; fee $4.00. 

48. Cookery. Foods and their relation to the body; review of 
chemistry and physiology of digestion; study of fermentation in its 
relation to fruit preservation. Marketing and serving and fruit 
preservation. Practice in home cookery — study, planning, market- 
ing, preparation and serving of meals. 5S. Prerequisites 44 and 
Chemistry 59; recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2 1-3; fee $3.00. 

49. Cookery. 6S. Prerequisite 48; recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; 
credit 2 1-3; fee $3.00. 

50. Theory of Design. Principles, color analysis, tone value, 
harmony, rhythm, balance, subordination. First applied to simple 
abstract problems of borders, surface patterns and regular spaces. 
Recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 2 1-3; fee $1.00. 

51. Applied Design. Applied to rugs, book-covers, stained glass 
windows; leather, metal, wood-block prints and stencils applied to 
various useful articles. Prerequisite 50; Recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 
hrs.; credit 2 1-3; fee $1.00. 

HORTICULTURE 

3. General Horticulture. Fruit growing and vegetable culture. 
General exercises in propagation, planting and management of 



-34- 



fruits and vegetables. Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2 2-3; 
fee $1.00. 

8. Landscape Gardening. Planning and ornamentation of home 
grounds, parks, and other public grounds; ornamentals adapted for 
planting in Iowa. The trees and shrubs on the campus and in the 
department collection afford excellent material for laboratory work. 
Recitations 2; credit 2. 

3 3. Truck Farming. Growing and marketing of the more im- 
portant truck crops, such as the potato, cabbage, onion and tomato. 
The trucking interests of Iowa. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

38. Plant Propagation. By asexual and sexual methods; germ- 
inating, testing and storage of seeds; multiplication of plants by 
cuttage, layerage and graftage, including nursery methods and man- 
agement. 4, 6 or 8S. Prerequisites, Botany 6 8 and Chemistry 25; 
recitation 1; lectures and lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.00. 

40. Small Fruits. Culture, harvesting, and marketing of the 
strawberry, raspberry, grape, currant, and other small fruits. Reci- 
tations 2; credit 2. 

LITERATURE 

6. The Short Story. From the time of its development as a 
distinct literary form to the present time, with consideration of the 
various types; selections from Irving, Poe, Hawthorne, Bret Harte, 
Stevenson, Balzac, De Maupassant; and among more recent authors, 
Kipling, Sarah Orne Jewett, Margaret Deland, George W. Cable, 
Thomas Nelson Page, F. Hopkinson Smith, Hamlin Garland, and 
Octave Thanet. To develop a taste for the best, and make future 
reading contribute to higher development. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

2 2. Shakespeare. The great dramas. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

MATHEMATICS 

7a. Elementary Algebra as required by teachers preparing to 
take the examination for the first grade certificate. Text, Wells 
High School Algebra. Prerequisite, less than 1 year of High School 
Algebra. Recitations daily; credit only in R. and G. T. course. 

8a. Elementary Algebra. Prerequisite, 1 year of High School 
Algebra. Recitations daily; credit only in R. and G. T. course. 

17. Algebra and Trigonometry. Definitions; Functions of 
Angles; Derivation of Trigonometric formulas with problems based 
on these formulas; Logarithms; Solution of right and oblique 
triangles. Recitations 3; credit 3. 

43. Plane Analytic Geometry. Representation of points, lines 
and curves in a plane, careful study of the graphs of equations, and 
investigation of the line, the circle, and the conic sections. Recita- 
itons 4; credit 4. 

45. Calculus. Differential calculus — expansion of functions, In- 
determinate forms, tangents, normals, asymptotes, direction of cur- 
vature, points of inflexion, radius of curvature, envelopes, and max- 
ima and minina; integraly calculus — applications made to determin- 
ing areas, lengths of curves, surfaces of revolution, volumes of 
solids of revolution and other solids, applications of double integra- 
tion to areas, surfaces, centers of gravity. Elements of differential 
equations. Prerequisite 44; recitations 5; credit 5. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
140. .Manual Training. ('arc and adjustment of hand and 



35— 



power tools, joinery, cabinet making, wood finishing, polishing and 
varnishing, wood turning and carving. An elective course especial- 
ly arranged for students in Industrial Science and women students 
in Home Economics who desire to prepare themselves to teach 
Manual Training. Lectures supplemented and illustrated by work 
in the shops. Credit 1 2-3. 

121. Mechanical Drawing. Use of drawing instruments, prac- 
tice in lettering, and making working drawings. Credit 2 hours. 

181. Mechanical Drawing. The use of drawing instruments, 
making of working drawings. Credit 1. 

220. Descriptive Geometry. Study of the principles of projec- 
tion of the point, line, and plane. The principles are illustrated 
and fixed in mind by the solution of numerous familiar examples 
to show the practical application of the subject. Credit 2. 

130. Shop Work. Forge work, forging and welding iron and 
steel and dressing and tampering tools. Credit 2. Pee $5.00. 

331. Shop Work. Pattern work, principles of joinery, wood 
turning, and carving as applied to the making of simple patterns 
and core boxes for iron, brass, and aluminum castings. Credit 2 
Fee $5.00. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE 

A-l. The work in the Women's Gymnasium is intended for 
.eachers (rural and grade) and will consist of marching, Swedish 
door work, light apparatus, as wands, bells, clubs, games and folk 
dancing, suitable for outdoors or the playground. A play festival 
will be given at the close of the term. 

A gymnasium suit and bloomers, middy blouses, gymnasium or 
tennis shoes will be required. 

A fee is necessary to cover the expense of furnishing towels and 
kimonas in the shower and locker rooms. Recitations 2; no credit; 
fee 25c. 

PHYSICS 

8-1. General Physics. This is the subject as listed under the 
rural and grade teachers course and does not carry college credit. 
A simple treatment of the fundamentals of the subject as required 
I'or the first grade certificate. Lectures 3; lab. 2, 2 hrs.; credit in 
rural and grade teachers course only. 

205. Mechanics, Heat and Light. Fundamental principles of 
physics and their applications. Prerequisite Mathematics 17; 
lectures 2; recitation 1; credit 3. 

4 04. Electricity and Magnetism and Light and Sound. Prere- 
quisite 303; lectures and recitations 5; lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 5; fee 
$2.00. 

POULTRY 

46. General Poultry Husbandry.. Present status of the poultry 
Industry; various kinds of poultry products ordinarily produced for 
sale with special reference to their relative importance and their 
production as a branch of general agriculture and as a specialized 
industry; brief consideration of the more important classes and 
breeds of poultry and poultry management dealing particularly 
with breeding, housing and yarding. Recitations 1V 2 ; lab. 1, 1V 2 
hr. ; credit 2; fee $2.00. 

4 7. General Poultry Husbandry. Continues the work in 46 and 



—36- 



takes up, in a general way, feeding, marketing, incubation and 
brooding. Prerequisite 46; recitations 1V 2 ; lab. 1, 1% hr. ; credit 
2; fee $2.00. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

6. Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence. The various 
mental features of child growth; characteristics of childhood and 
the significant mental changes of the adolescent period, with special 
reference to the needs of teachers and parents; the individual, 
parental and social instincts; the adaptive instincts; imitation, cur- 
iosity, play. The educational value of play; the regulative instinct, 
moral and religious; the collecting and constructive instincts. The 
Montesori system and its application illustrated by simple appara- 
tus. The psychology of adolescence; the boy scout movement, the 
girls' campfire, athletics. The psychology of cooking clubs and 
corn-judging contests. The instincts of childhood and adolescence 
and their place in the natural method of development. Recitations 
3; credit 3. 

7. Outlines of Psychology. An introduction to the study of the 
normal, adult, human mind. A foundation for all the other stud- 
ies in Psychology. Recitations 3; credit 3. 

8. Educational Psychology. A treatment of special phases of 
General and Genetic Psychology which are most applicable to edu- 
cation. The processes of adaptation: instinct, impulse, habit, and 
will: the applied psychology of perception, imagination, memory, 
association, attention, interest, simple feelings, emotions, and the 
higher thought processes; special problems: mental inheritance, 
individual differences, etc. Recitations 3; credit 3. 

12. Physical and Mental Tests. Designed particularly for those 
who expect to teach and for those most interested in the develop- 
ment of the child. Indicates the purpose of physical and mental 
tests; outlines their development; describes various forms of ap- 
paratus used, and the different methods of procedure; explains the 
treatment of the data secured; interprets the results and the con- 
clusions thus far obtained. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

SOILS 

.1. Soil Physics. Origin, formation and classification of soils; 
soil moisture and methods of conserving it; the principles which 
underlie dry farming; soil temperature, and conditions influencing 
it; soil texture as affecting heat, moisture and plant food; surface 
tension, capillarity, osmosis, and diffusion as affecting soil condi- 
tions; the effect upon the soil and the crop of plowing, harrowing, 
cultivating, cropping, and rolling; washing of soils and methods of 
preventing it; preparation of seed beds; cultivation and drainage 
as affecting moisture, temperature, root development and the sup- 
ply of available plant food. The determination of the specific 
gravity, apparent specific gravity, volume weight, porosity, water- 
holding capacity, and capillary power of various soils; effect of 
mulches on the evaporation of water from the soil and the physical 
effects upon the soil of different systems of rotation and of continu- 
ous cropping. Recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 4; deposit $4.00. 

2. Soil Fertility. Maintenance of fertility, fertilizers and rota- 
tions; the Influence of commercial fertilizers, barnyard manure, 
and green manure Upon the quality and yield of various crops; the 
effecl of differenl crops upon the fertility of the soil and upon sue- 



—37— 



ceeding crops; different system of rotation and the effect upon the 
productiveness of the soil of various methods of soil management; 
storing, preserving, and application of farm yard manure. Labora- 
tory study of manures, fertilizers and soils; their composition and 
agricultural value. Pot and field experiments to show the influence 
of fertilizers applied to the soil in different quantities and at differ- 
ent times, upon the quality and yield of various crops. Legumes as 
fertilizers and their place in crop rotation. Special types of soil 
found in different sections of the state, such as clay, gumbo, loess, 
and peat, studied with special reference to the best methods of 
handling and cropping these soils. Chemical study of samples of 
soil from the home farm or any other soil. Recitations 2; labs. 2, 
2 hr.; credit 4; fee $8.00. 

3. Research Work in Soil Physics. Experimentation and study 
of special problems relating to the physical characteristics of soil 
and their relation to crop production. A wide range of special' 
subjects. Special advantages for a study of the physical composi- 
tion of soils. Prerequisite 1; labs. 3, 2 hr. ; credit 2; deposit $5.00. 

4. Research Work in Soil Fertility. Experimentation, special 
problems relating to maintaining and increasing the productive 
capacity of soils. Types of soil, systems of soil management, plant 
food, and productive capacity of soils. For students not taking 
thesis work in soils, this study can be arranged so that a complete 
fertility study may be made of samples of soil taken from the home 
farm. As a result of this study, systems of soil and crop manage- 
ment may be suggested. A valuable study for men who expect to 
farm under corn-belt conditions. Prerequisite 2; labs. 3, 2 hr.; 
credit 2; deposit $5.00. 

MUSIC 
Members of the Summer School desiring instruction in music will 
be offered courses in Voice, Piano and Public School Music. 

Private lessons in Voice and Piano are not included in the regular 
college fee, and must be arranged for with the Director of the 
School of Music. The fees are payable in advance at the Treasur- 
er's office. Anyone desiring a lesser number of lessons than the 
usual number of three per week will pay a slightly higher rate 
than the following prices: 

Three lessons a week in Voice or Piano — $18.00 for the Summer 
Session. 

The practice pianos of the School of Music will be at the disposal 
of students at the following rates: One hour a day for the six 
weeks or less, $1.50; two hours a day, $2.50; three hours a day, 
$3.50. These are the regular rates charged in this department 
during the college year. 

Classes in Public School Music will be given during the first six 
weeks of the Summer Session as a regular part of the work in the 
Rural and Grade Teachers' Course. There will be classes five times 
a week in each of the following subjects: 
Rudiments of Music 
Dictation 
Sightreading 

Methods and Materials for lower grades. 
For further particulars address, 

J. C. Harris, 
Director School of Music. 



—38— 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS 

Where schedules can be changed to the advantage of some stu- 
dents without inconvenience to others, changes will be made freely. 

Recitations daily unless otherwise specified. 

Abbreviations : A. Ed. — Agricultural Education. A. E. — Agricultural En- 
gineering. Ag. H. — Agricultural Hall. A. H. — Animal Husbandry. Bac. — 
Bacteriology. Bot. — Botany. Cen. — Central Building. Chem. — Chemistry. 
C. B. — Chemistry Building. D. B. — Dairy Building. Econ. — Economic. 
En. An. — Engineering Annex. En. H. — Engineering Hall. Eng. — English. 
F. C. — Farm Crops. F. Mang. — Farm Management. For. — Forestry. Geol. 
— Geology. H. E. — Home Economics. H. E. B. — Home Economics Build- 
ing. Hist. — History. Hort. — Horticulture. Lab. — Laboratory. Lit. — Lit- 
erature. L. P. — Lower Pavilion. M. H. — Margaret Hall. Math. — Mathe- 
matics. M. E. — Mechanical Engineering. O. A. — Old Agricultural Hall. 
Phys. — Physics. Psych. — Psychology. R. — Room. Rec. — Recitation. U. P 
— Upper Pavilion. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 



(First Half.) 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


A. E. 5 


Rec. 8 Lab. 3-5 Tu. Th. Sat. 


204 


O. A. 




A. E. 19 


10 M. W. F. 


204 


O. A. 




A. E. 21 


10-12 Tu. Th. Sat. 


204 O. A. 




A. Ed. 1 


3, observation hrs. to be arranged 


210 


Ag. H. 




A. Ed. 2 


9, daily, 4 Tu. Th. S. 


208 Ag. H. 




A. Ed. 3 


2 


210 Ag. H. 




A. Ed. 5 


8 


208 Ag. H. 




A. Ed. 7 


1 


210 


Ag. H. 




A. Ed. 10 


11 


208 Ag. H. 




A. Ed. lla-12a 


10, 2 


109 


Ag. H. 




A. H. 1 


7-9, 3-5 


U. P. 




A. H. 2 


10-12 


U. P. 




A. H. 3 


Rec. 3 Lab. 7-9 


120 


Ag. H. 


L. P 


A. H. 4 


Rec. 4 Lab. 10-12 


109 


Ag. H. 


L. P 


Bac. 1 


Rec. 10 lab. 6-3 hr. 


308 


Cen. 




Bac. 15 


Rec. 10 Lab. 3-2 hr. 


308 


Cen. 




Bac. 18 


Rec. 7 Labs. 6-2 hr. 


308 


Cen. 




Bot. 15 


Rec. 11 Lab. 1-4 


312 


Cen. 




Bot. 70 


Rec. 11 Lab. 1-4 


312 


Cen. 




Bot. 60 


10 M. W. F. Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. S. 


312 


Cen. 




Chem. 107 


Rec. 8 daily 2 M. W. F. Lab. 
10-12 


181 


C. B. 




Chem. 109 


Rec. 8 daily 2 M. W. F. Lab. 
10-12 


181 


C. B. 




("horn. 351 


Rec. 11 daily 2 Tu. Th. S. Lab. 

8-10 Tu. Th. S. 


286 


C. B. 




Chem. 352 


Rec. 10 Lab. 8-10 daily 


181 


C. B. 




Chem. 375 


Rec. 10 daily 2 M. W. F. Lab. 
8-10 


286 


C. B. 




Chem. 370 


Rec. 11 daily 2 Tu. Th. S. Lab. 


181 C. B. 






8-10 








Dairy 10 


8 


11 D. B. 




Dairy 12 


Rec. 10 Lab. 3-5 M. W. F. 


11 D. B. 




Econ. 10 


10 daily 9 M. W. F. 


222 


Cen. 





—39— 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS-Continued 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


Econ. 24 


8 daily 9 Tu. Th. S. 




2 22 Cen. 


Eng. 10 


9 daily 1 M. W. F. 




13 Cen. 


Eng. 11 


10 daily 1 Tu. Th. S. 




13 Cen. 


Lit. 6 


8 




13 Cen. 


Lit. 22 


4 




13 Cen. 


F. C. 1 


Kec. 9 Lab. 1-3 M. W 


F. 


307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 2 


Rec. 11 Lab. 1-3 Tu. 


Hi. S. 


307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 3 


3-5 




307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 17 


Rec. 7 M. W. F. Lab. 


7-9 Tu. Th. 






S. 




307 Ag. H. 


F. Mang. 8 


Rec. 10 Lab. M. W. F 


. 3-5 


307 Ag. H. 


For. 1 


7 




210 Ag. H. 


Hist. 14 


8 




208 Cen. 


H. E. 1-4 


Rec. 7 Lab. 8-12 




110 H. E. B. 


H. E. 41 


9 




10 H. E. B. 


H. E. 43-44 


Rec 7 Lab. 8-12 




202 H. E. B. 


H. E. 48-49 


Rec. 7 Lab. 8-12 




14 H. E. B. 


H. E. 9a-10a 


10, 2 




109 Ag. H. 


H. E. 50 


Rec. 1 Tu. Th. S. Lab 


3-5 daily 


206 H. E. B. 


Hort. 3 


Rec. 9 Lab. 1-3 




210 Ag. H. 


Hort. 8 


10 




208 Ag. H. 


Hort. 40 


7 




208 Ag. H. 


Math. 17 


7 daily 1 M. W. F. 




221 Cen. 


Math. 7a 


8 




221 Cen. 


Math. 8a 


8 




102 Cen. 


Math. 4 3 


11, 4 




221 Cen. 


Math. 4 5 


7 daily 1 M. W. F. 




102 Cen. 


M. E. 121 


8-12, 1-5 




403 En. H. 


M. E. 130 


1-5 




Forge Shop 


M. E. 140 


8-12, 1-5 




Pattern Shop 


M. E. 181 


8-12, 1-5 




403 En. H. 


M. E. 219 


8-12, 1-5 




403 En. H. 


M. E. 220 


8-12, 1-5 




403 En. H. 


M. E. 331 


1-5 




Pattern Shop 


Phys. 205 


8 daily, 4 M. W. F. 




113 En. H. 


Phys. 404 


Rec. 8, 3, Lab. 10-12 


M. W. F. 


112 En. H. 


Psych. 6 


10 daily 5 Tu. Th. S. 




210 Cen. 


Psych. 7 


8 daily 4 M. W. F. 




210 Cen. 


Soils 1 


Pec. 8 Lab. 10-12 




7 Ag. H. 


Soils 2 


Rec. 9 Lab. 1-3 




7 Ag. H. 


Soils 3 


As arranged 






Soils 4 


As arranged 







—40— 

GENERAL AND RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSES 
(First Half.) 



Course 






Hour 


of Recitation 


Room 


Agriculture S. 


3 




Sec. 1 and 


5, 8-10 


306 O. A. H. 


Agriculture S. 


3 




Sec. 2 and 


6, 10-12 


(Sec. 1, 2, 3, 4) 


Agriculture S. 


3 




Sec. 3 and 


7, 1-3 


59 C. B. 


Agriculture S. 


3 




Sec. 4 and 


8, 3-5 


(Sec. 5, 6, 7, 8) 


Agriculture S. 


4 




Sec. 3, 3-5 




306 Ag. H. 


Agriculture S. 


4 




Sec. 1 and 


2, 10-12, 1-3 


120 Ag. H. 


Agriculture S. 


2 




As arranged 


L 




Algebra 






8 




221 Cen. 


Arithmetic 






7, 11 




13 Cen. 


Civics 






1 




208 Cen. 


Didactics I 






Sec. 1, 9, Sec. 2, 11, 


109 Ag. H. 


Didactics II 






Sec. 3, 3 












Sec. 1, 8, Sec. 2, 1 


109 Ag. H. 


Didactics III 






Sec. 2 




13 Cen. 


Drawing 






Rec. 1, M. W. F. Lab. 










3-5 daily 




206 H. E. B. 


Economics 






3 




208 Cen. 


English- (grammar) 


10 




210 Ag. H. 


English (grammar) 


2 




208 Ag. H. 


Geography 






8 and 4 




10 Cen. 


History 






1 and 3 




208 Ag. H. 


Home Economics 


30 


1-3 




100 H. E. B. 


Home Economics 


31 


10-12 




100 H. E. B. 


Home Econom 


LCS 


35 


1-3 




202 H. E. B. 


Home Economics 


36 


3-5 




202 H. E. B. 


Home Economics 


40 


10-12 




14 H. E. B. 


Home Economics 


32 


8-10, 10-12, 


1-3, 3-5 


102 H. E. B. 


Home Econom 


LCS 


37 


8-10, 10-12, 


1-3, 3-5 


200 H. E. B. 


Home Econom 


LCS 


38 


8-10, 10-12, 


1-3, 3-5 










Sec. 1, 4, 6, 


7 


6 H. E. B. 








Sec. 2, 3, 5 


8 


9 H. E. B. 






"1 


Sec. 9, 10, 11, 12 


11 Cen. 


Manual Training 


S6 


8-10, 10-12, 


1-3, 3-5 










Sec. 1, 2, 3, 


8 


203 En. An. 








Sec. 4, 5, 6, 


7 


20 5 En. An. 








Sec. 9, 10, 11, 12 


O. A. H. 


Manual Training 


S14 


10-12 




213 En. An. 


Manual Training 


S15 


3-5 




213 En. An. 


.Music 






8, 2 




209 Cen. 


Orl hography 






7:30-8 




109 Ag. H. 


Penmanship I 






9, 11 




110 Ag. H. 


Penmanship II 






2 




110 Ag. H. 


Physical Education 


8 M. W., 10 


Tu. Th. 


Marg. Hall 


Physics 






Sec. 1, 7 M. 


W. F. 


207 Eng. H. 








Sec. 2, 7 Tu 


Th. S. 


207 Eng. H. 


Physiology 






9, 2 




10 Cen. 


Reading 






1 




10 Cen. 


Reading 






4 




210 Ag. H. 



-41— 



SCHEDULE FOR SECOND HALF 

Schedule for the second half of the Summer Session will be de- 
finitely determined during the first week of the first half. Students 
and teachers desiring work during the second half are asked to bear 
this in mind and are asked to get their askings to the director of 
the Summer Session before the first week of the first half. This 
co-operation will make it possible to meet the demands of teachers 
and others for work without any more repetition than is absolutely 
required. 

College Credit Work. Many requests have already come in from 
high school men, superintendents and others, indicating that they 
will be present for the entire 12 weeks and asking for work of a 
college grade during this entire time. It now seems quite certain 
that the following courses will be offered during + v .e second half: 
Animal Husbandry 20, Farm Crops 1 and 2, Horticulture 33 and 
38, Poultry 46-47, Botany 61, Chemistry 108 and 110, Psychology 
8, 12, and work in Agricultural Education. 

General Courses. In the general courses work will be carried 
forward in all of the lines enabling teachers who are preparing to 
teach the new subjects to get the full 12 weeks work as recom- 
mended by the State Educational Board of Examiners. In order to 
effect as great economy as possible the general course in agricul- 
ture for the first half will not be repeated during the second half. 
The same is true of the work in home economics and in manual 
training, but the work will be carried forward for the full 12 weeks. 
Those who have attended the summer session heretofore will find 
a continuation of work during the first six weeks. 

MODEL SCHOOL PROGRAM 

Room 1 Central, Grades, First, Second and Third. 
Room 3 Central, Grades, Fifth, Sixth and Eighth. 

NOTE : Work in the model school begins at 8 o'clock and continues until 
11 :30. In the lower grades emphasis will be placed upon reading, Ian. 
guage. numbers, busy work. History, geography and nature work will be 
secondary and more or less related to the language and story work. 

The work in the upper grades will place greater emphasis upon English, 
arithmetic, physiology and history and will also demonstrate the possibili- 
ties of work in home economics and agriculture. The rural school plan 
on home economics work will be demonstrated three days each week. The 
work in agriculture will be correlated with the school plot at the college and 
the home project work being carried by the pupils. Definite schedule of 
program is not here given because of the necessity of changing the pro- 
gram in order to properly accommodate the work for observation purposes. 

SUGGESTIONS TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

1. Read carefuly the description of the various courses and 
other matter in this bulletin, and if the information is not suf- 
ficiently specific, do not hesitate to write for particulars. 

2. Fill out and mail the information blank on page 43 which 
will give us an idea of your demands. This places you under no 
obligations, but it gives the Director of the Summer Session a bet- 
ter basis for making plans to handle the work on an efficient basis 
when you arrive. For limitations on the amount of work that may 
be carried in the rural and grade teachers' course see page 14 of 
this bulletin. 

3. Upon your arrival at the depot in Ames, make yourself 



42- 



known to a member of the Reception Committee, who will be 
recognized by the college badge. If for any reason you miss the 
committee, take the college car to the college, and get off at the 
Farm Station. Go direct to Agricultural Hall. The Bureau of In- 
formation will be found in the east corridor of the main floor. 
Opportunity will be there offered for checking your grips until you 
have located a room and are ready for them. 

If you come on the interurban, get off at the Campus. 

4. The following is the plan of registration: 

(1) Go to the Registrar's office, fill out the two cards 
there furnished you, pay the Summer Session fee (or deposit 
certificates signed by your superintendent entitling you to free 
tuition in rural and grade teachers' course), and obtain a 
receipt. 

(2) Go to room 110, Agricultural Hall, for classification. 
Have in mind the work which you want as definitely as pos- 
sible, but do not hesitate to ask questions and be fully advised 
before completing classification. 

(3) If any of your courses carry laboratory fees, fee cards 
may be secured from the instructors, and fees paid at the 
Treasurer's office. 

5. There are ample accommodations, and advanced notice is not 
necessary. The college has been accustomed to handling 2 800 
students during the regular year, and knows how to do it right. 
However, if your plans are matured sufficiently early, it will assist 
in rapid assignment and registration if advanced notice is given. 



—43 — 



INFORMATION BLANK 

Prospective students are asked to use this blank in furnishing 
information and in making requests for further information. Cut 
out and mail to G. M. Wilson, Director of the Summer Session, 
Ames, Iowa. 

Check below the courses in which you are interested. Check 
subject and underscore course number. Check other points also. 
Do not delay your inquiry. Get your information definite as soon 
as possible and then secure a place by registration in advance. 

Courses totaling six semester hours, is our recommendation as 
to full time college credit work for each half. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSE 



. . . .Agricultural Engineering 

5, 19, 21 
. . . .Agricultural Economics 10 
. . . .Agricultural Education 1, 

2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10 
....Animal Husbandry 1, 2, 

3, 4, 20 

. . . .Bacteriology 1, 15, 18 

Botany 15, 70, 60, 61 

Chemistry 103, 104, 107, 

108, 109, 110, 351, 352, 

375, 376 
. . . .Dairying 10, 12 

English 10, 11 

. . . .Forestry 1 

. . . .Farm Crops 1, 2, 3, 17 



. .Farm Management 8 

. .History 14 

. .Home Economics 1-4, 

9a-10a, 43-44, 50-51 
. .Horticulture 3, 8, 33, 38, 40 
. .Literature 6, 22 
..Manual Training 121, 140, 

181, 220 
. .Mathematics 7a, 8a, 17, 43, 45 
. .Physics 205, 404 
. .Poultry 46, 47 
. .Psychology 6, 7, 8, 12 
..Rural Sociology 2 4 
. .Shop Work, 130, 331 
. .Soils, 1, 2, 3, 4 



I can attend only the first half, June 14-July 23 . 
I can attend only the second half, July 26-Sept. 3 

I can attend either half 

I will attend for twelve weeks 



— 44 — 

GENERAL COURSES 

General Agriculture 

Domestic Science for rural and grade teachers 

Domestic Science for Homemakers 

Manual Training 

Education (Didactics) 1, 2 

Reading, Arithmetic, History, Geography, English, Physio- 
logy, Orthography, Penmanship, Music, Drawing, Physi- 
cal Education 

Civics, Economics, Physics, Algebra. 

Check below if you want the above work for either of the fol- 
lowing reasons: to meet the requirements of the law relating to 

12 weeks normal training 

3 points on salary 

12 weeks training for grades in the new subjects (Agricul- 
ture, Domestic Science and Manual Training). 
Students wanting the work for any of the three reasons given 
above, are limited to four subjects, one of which must be educa- 
tion; except that orthography, penmanship, or physical educatior. 
may be taken as a fifth subject. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 



Are you a graduate of an accredited High School? 
Do you want copy of Summer Session Bulletin? . . 



3 

U Do you want copy of Rural Life Conference Circular? 



Do you want camping space (men and families only) ? 

Is this card to be taken as request for advanced registration or sim- 
ply for information? 

Shall we reserve room for you 

Name 

Address (city) 

County State 

Address on March 3 (for Summer Session Bulletin) 

Name Address 



fi I believe that the Country which 
God made is more beautiful than the 
City which man made; that life out 
of doors and in touch with the earth 
is the natural life of man. I believe 
that work is work wherever I find it; 
but that work with nature is more 
inspiring than work with the most 
intricate machinery . I believe that 
the dignity of labor depends not on 
what you do, but on how you do it; that 
opportunity comes to the boy on the 
farm as often as to a boy in the city; 
that life is larger and freer and hap- 
pier on the farm than in town; that 
my success depends not upon my loca- 
tion, but, upon my self -not upon what 
I actually do, but upon luck and. 
upon pluck. I believe in working 
when you work, and playing when 
you play, and ingiving and demand- 
ing a square deal in every act of life. " 



unrttjfocst journal of ^bucattmt. 



9* I H 



Jummer OessiolT 
owa State College 




< >M k;i al publication 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICUL1 (JRE 



COURSES OFFERED IN 1916 

1. For High School Teachers, Superintendents, and College 
Students the following college credit courses: 

Agriculture — (32 regular courses) 

Agricultural Engineering 4 courses 

Animal Husbandry 5 

Apiculture 1 

Dairying 2 

Farm Crops 4 

Farm Management 1 

Forestry 4 

Horticulture 5 

Poultry 2 

Soils 4 

Agricultural Economics 1 

Agricultural Education 6 

Bacteriology 4 

Botany 3 

Chemistry 10 

Economic Science 1 

English and Literature 5 

History 2 

Home Economics 10 

Manual Training 8 

Mathematics 5 

Photography 1 

Physics 2 

Psychology 4 

Public Speaking 2 

Rural Sociology 1 

General courses in agriculture, manual training and home eco- 
nomics adapted for high school teachers. 

2. For Rural and Grade Teachers. Instruction in the in- 
dustrial subjects, — agriculture, home economics, manual train- 
ing, and didactics. Enough work is provided in these sub- 
jects to occupy the full time of the student, but a part of his 
time may be spent in special classes in the common branches, and 
the Hi-si grade certificate subjects. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

AND MECHANIC ARTS 

Vol. XIV MAY 1, 1916 No. 35 

Sixth Annual 

Summer Session 

General Announcement 



1916 



Ames, Iowa 



Published Tri-Monthly by the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 
Entered as Second-Class Matter October 26, 1905, at the Post Office at Ames. Iowa, under 
the Act of Congress of July 16, 1904. 



— 2— 



1916 SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR 

Up to June 10 — Advanced registration. 

June 10, Saturday— Registration, 8:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M. 

June 12, Monday— 8:00 A .M., Registration. 1:00 P. M., Work begins 
on regular schedule. 

June 17, Saturday — Regular work in A. M. (to make up work missed 
Monday A. M., June 12). 

June 19, Monday — Beginning of study work for rural ministers and 
leaders. Continues two weeks. 

June 22, Thursday — Ben Greet Woodland Players. 

June 28, Wednesday— 4:00 P. M., Opening of Rural Life Conference. 
Closes, Friday, June 30, 4:00 P. M. 

June 28, 29, 30, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday — Examination for 
county uniform certificates. 

July 4, Tuesday — National Holiday. 

July 21, Friday — 4:00 P. M., Close of iirst half of Summer (Session. 



July 24, Monday — 8:00 A. M., Beginning of second half of Summer 
Session. 

July 26, 27, 28, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday — Examination for 
county uniform certificates. 

Aug. 5, Saturday — Regular work. 

Aug. 12, Saturday A. M. — Regular Work. 

Aug. 31, Thursday 12 m. — Close of the Summer Session. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




General Statement. — Summer 

Session work was offered by the 
Iowa State College for the first 
time in 1911. In that summer a 
short course extending over 
two weeks was attended by 
about fifty superintendents 
and high school teachers of 
the state. Since that time the 
interest in agriculture and in- 
dustrial subjects has increased 
tremendously, not only in this 
state, but throughout the 
United States. At the present 
time 22 states require the 
teaching of agriculture in the 
public schools, and in many 
more of the states agriculture is taught, especially in the high schools. In 
1912 the Summer Session w 7 as extended to six weeks, and had a total enroll- 
ment of 128 students. The third Summer Session, 1913, enrolled 225 
students. These students came from 63 counties of the state and 10 states 
of the Union. 

The Summer Session in 1914 had a total attendance of 618. They 
represented 96 counties in the state, 15 states and 6 foreign countries. 
Eighty-eight per cent of them were teachers in the public schools and not 
in attendance during the regular college year. Last summer the enrollment 
increased to 1054, the character of the enrollment remaining about the 
same. The enrollment in the classes in industrial subjects and the hearty 
response of the teachers to this work, show the wisdom of the legislature 
in passing the law relating to the teaching of these subjects in the public 
schools. 

Teachers in service can be helped best through the Summer Session, and 
in a large measure, at least, they have a right to the advantages of the 
unusual equipment of the Iowa State College. This is especially true since 
the legislation requiring the teaching of the industrial subjects in the 
public school. No other institution in the middle west has a better selected 
faculty, or more adequate equipment than the Iowa State College. 

Who May Properly Attend. On account of the easy conditions of 
entrance, many receive benefit from the Summer Session who do not at- 
tend during the regular year. The following should be particularly in- 
9ted in the Summer Session: 

1. ALL TEACHEKS, or persons expecting to teach next year, may use 
the Summer Session to secure work in the industrial subjects as required by 
the recent legislation. Teachers in the elementary schools will find profitable 
work in the Rural and Grade Teachers' Course. High school teachers may 
secure strong work along particular lines as listed under college credit 
courses. 

2. SUPERINTENDENTS, PRINCIPALS AND SUPERVISORS. The 
large number of superintendents and principals who have been enrolled 
in the Summer Session in the past indicates clearly that it is serving them 
to good advantage, and meeting a special need which they feel for getting 



acquainted with the newer subjects of manual training and agriculture, or 
of pursuing courses in agricultural education. An examination of the Iowa 
Directory indicates that agriculture is taught in the high schools of the 
state by the superintendents more often than by any other single group. 
Beginning and advanced courses are offered in the present session in soils, 
farm crops, animal husbandry, dairying, agricultural engineering, horti- 
culture, and in the related subjects of rural sociology, agricultural econ- 
omics, agricultural education, botany, bacteriology, etc. The Summer Ses- 
sion gives such superintendents and principals an opportunity to secure 
work of a high character under regular college instruction and under fav- 
orable conditions. 

3. COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS. Six weeks at the Iowa State Col- 
lege would be unusually helpful in view of the rapid development of the 
new subjects in the schools. 

4. HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES will find an opportunity to start 
the college course. High school graduates who think of entering the Iowa 
State College in the fall of 1916 may take advantage of the Summer 
Session to become acquainted with college methods and to secure work to- 
wards graduation. Increasing numbers are taking advantage of the 
Summer Session for this purpose. 

5. REGULAR STUDENTS IN THE IOWA STATE COLLEGE may 
make up back work, shorten their course by doing advanced work or in- 
crease their electives. 

6. STUDENTS in other colleges who are interested in the industrial 
work and related lines will find other colleges willing to substitute credits 
made at this institution. 

7. FORMER GRADUATES may complete the necessary work in psy- 
chology and agricultural education in order to secure the first grade state 
certificate. 

8. ANY MATURE INDIVIDUAL who gives evidence of ability to 
carry the work with profit will be admitted without examination, but such 
individual must satisfy the department concerned as to his ability to carry 
the work. 

9. RURAL AND VILLAGE MINISTERS will find especially valuable 
help in the Rural Life Conference. Bankers, farmers, rural leaders, mothers 
and daughters will find a welcome, an atmosphere of culture and inspira- 
tion, and practical help for their work. 

Conditions of Admission. All students who can profit by the in- 
struction offered will be admitted without examination. It is presumed 
that all applying for admission have a serious purpose, and are interested 
in the industrial work. College credit will be granted, however, only to 
those who meet standard entrance requirements. 

Courses and Credits. Nearly one hundred college credit courses are 
offered. Thirty-two of these are in agriculture. An average student 
should be able to make six hours credit during a single half of the Sum- 
mer Session. All courses offered are completed during a single half of the 
ftu turner Session by increasing the number of recitations per week. There 
are no split courses. A student desiring to carry more than six (or six and 
a fraction) hours of college credit work will be required to make applica- 
tion for permission to take extra work, application being countersigned 
by the instructors involved. The committee on extra work will meet Satur- 
day evening, June 10. 

Late Entrance. Because of the rapidity with which the work moves in 
;i short session, students should enter LB time to attend the first session 
of all cdasses. Work begins at, 1:00 P. M. on Monday, June 12. Work in 
the new industrial subjects has laboratory periods, and students should 
therefore plan to be present for the first meeting of the class. 

General Courses. In the general courses students will be given more 
freedom as to the number of hours to be carried, with this proviso, that 



in case they desire certificates under the new Legislation requiring twelve 
weeks of professional training, or increased wages because of attending 

a Summer Session for six weeks, they will be limited in the amount of 
work that can be carried according to the regulations sent out by the 
State Educational Board of Examiners. 

Special Work. Students wishing to do advanced or other special work 
not announced in this bulletin should communicate at an early date with 
the Director of the Summer Session, or with the professor in whose de- 
partment they wish to work. Consideration may be given to a sufficient 
number of requests. 

Meeting Residence Requirements for a Degree Through Summer 
Session Work. Because of the largely increased attendance at the Sum- 
mer Session, provision has been made for the satisfying of residence re- 
quirements for a degree on the basis of four Summer Sessions of six weeks 
each. The amount of work required for the degree will need to be supple- 
mented by work in absence, or by correspondence. 

The Summer Session offers opportunity for graduate work in agriculture 
and related sciences. The number of graduate students in the Summer 
Session is increasing each year. Resident requirements for the master's 
degree may be met by attending the Summer Session for six weeks during 
three consecutive summers and carrying work in absentia. For a detailed 
statement as to graduate work, address R. A. Pearson, Acting Dean of the 
Graduate Division. 

Fees. The single Summer Session fee of $5.00 for each half of six 
weeks, covers work in all courses with the exception of the Music De- 
partment. The fee for less than the full time is $1.00 a week, with $2.00 
as a minimum. Any laboratory fees are indicated in connection with the 
descriptions of the courses. In the Rural and Grade Teachers' Course, 
there are no incidental fees. No fee is charged for attendance at the Rural 
Life Conference. 

Room and Board. Room and board is available in private homes and 
at the college dormitories at prices which are customary throughout Iowa. 
The cafe in Alumni Hall will be open during the entire Summer Session, 
and will be managed on the cafeteria plan. 

Women will arrange for room through the regular college committee of 
which Mrs. Emily Cunningham is chairman. The college dormitories will 
be open for women students for board and room. A uniform rate of $5.00 
a week will be charged for board and room in the dormitories where two 
occupy the same room. After the dormitories are filled, Mrs. Cunningham 
will assign women to selected houses about the campus, where the regular 
college rules will apply. In the dormitories and private homes alike, mat- 
tresses only are furnished for the cots, so that students should bring a pil- 
low, sheets, pillow cases, and an extra blanket. 

Women rooming in private homes may secure board at the college dormi- 
tory dining rooms at the regular rate. 

Rooms for men will be available in private homes and rooming houses 
about the campus. Rooming arrangements for men will be in charge of 
Fred M. Hansen, Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

Expenses. Expenses will vary with the individual. For six weeks the 
expenses need not exceed $40 or $45, in addition to car fare. This makes 
provision for tuition, $5.00; room and board for six weeks, $30.00; books 
and laundry, $5.00, and other incidentals. 

Certificates. Students satisfactorily completing any of the general 
courses offered in the six weeks' Summer Session will, upon request, be 
given a certificate showing attendance and grades. Most teachers will de- 
sire that attendance count toward the satisfaction of the recent law re- 
quiring twelve weeks of professional training, or the law giving certain 
credits for attendance at a six weeks' Summer Session. 

The State Board of Education Examiners will grant five-year first-grade 




< 






certificates to graduates of the Town State College or other approved col- 
leges who have completed (a) six semester-hours of psychology, and (b) 
fourteen hours of education. The courses offered in the Summer Session 
enable students to meet these requirements. 

Teachers' Examination. The State Teachers' examination for June and 
July will be held at the college during the Summer Session for the con- 
fluence of teachers in attendance. One expecting to take an examination 
at the college should bring with him a statement from the county superin- 
tendent which will admit to the examination. It is also advised that the 
fee be paid to the county superintendent although where such fee has not 
been previously paid it will be collected and forwarded to the county super- 
intendent. 

The Appointment Committee. In order to better serve the schools of 
the state, the faculty lias provided a regular Appointment Committee, the 
duties of which are to assist the students of the College who desire to en- 
ter educational work in finding the positions for which they are best fitted, 
and to aid school officials in finding the teachers, principals, supervisors and 
superintendents best prepared for the positions to be filled. Students of 
the Summer Session who intend to teach or wish to better their positions, 
are invited to register with this committee. Blanks which are provided for 
that purpose may be secured by calling at the office of the Director of the 
Summer Session, Room 318, Agricultural Hall. No fee is charged for the 
services of this committee. 

Chapel. Chapel services are held Tuesday of each week from 7:40 to 
8:00 o'clock A. M. This is more or less in the nature of a convocation, as 
well as a chapel service, and furnishes opportunity for announcements or 
for brief remarks upon subjects of immediate interest. 

Each Sunday evening, vesper services are held from 6:15 to 6:45 at the 
campanile when the weather is favorable. In case of inclement weather, 
the meeting is held in Agricultural Assembly. 

Students' Mail. Students will avoid inconvenience by having their mail 
addressed, temporarily at least, to Station A, Ames, Iowa. This postoffice is 
located upon the College campus, and mail may be called for conveniently. 

Summer Employment. Students coming for the short Summer Session 
are not advised to seek employment but to give their full time to school 
work. This is particularly urged in the case of teachers desiring to meet 
the requirements of the State Educational Board of Examiners with refer- 
ence to normal training or the three points on salary or who desire to take 
the new subjects (Agriculture, Home Economics, and Manual Training) 
and have the grades in these subjects transferred direct to the certificate. 

There are usually some summer calls for help. Students may learn of 
these calls through Mr. Fred M. Hansen, Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

Recreation. While the primary object of the Summer Session is work 
and study, yet these will be facilitated by a sufficient amount of recreation. 
Students are urged to effect organizations and to arrange for tournaments 
in tennis, baseball, track, or indoor work. The Committee on Games and 
Recreation will encourage and help in organizing the details of this work. 
Play hour, 7 to 9 Friday evenings. 

Tenting Privilege. The privilege of tenting in the north woods will 
be continued this summer. There is no charge for tenting space but at 
present the space is limited. It will be well to arrange in advance for the 
privilege. Tents may be brought along or rented of tenting companies. 
One company in Des Moines makes a price of $5 for six weeks for a 10 
foot by 12 foot tent. 

Special Features. One feature of the Summer Session which is par- 
ticularly worth while is the opportunity to hear educators of national repu- 
tation. Last year's policy of selecting a limited number of men whose ad- 
dresses no one can afford to miss will be continued this year. These lee- 



tures for the most part are scheduled for the evening; occasionally, how- 
ever, at 5:00. 

Shakespearean Festival. On Thursday, June 22, the Ben Greet Wood- 
land Players of national fame, will give a matinee and evening performance 
on the college campus. The program as at present planned will be as 
follows : 

Afternoon matinee : "A Comedy of Errors. ' ' 

Evening performance: "Borneo and Juliet." 

The charge will be reasonable and the announcement of this festival is 
made with confidence that it will be appreciated by the Summer School 
students. 

Vocational Education and Vocational Guidance. The course in voca- 
tional education and vocational guidance by Mrs. Anna L. Burdick, Voca- 
tional Supervisor of the Des Moines Schools, will be continued during the 




Manual Training Benches made by Rural and Grade Teachers, 1915 
Summer Session 



present Summer Session and will be further supplemented by special lectures 
by Dr. C. A. Prosser, presidenl of the Dunwoody [ndustrial Institute of 

Minneapolis, and formerly secretary of the National Society for the Promo- 
tion of Industrial Education. This Line of work has proven of unusual in- 
terest to Summer Session students. 

The Model School. The popular, two-room, consolidated Model School 
will be continued, in charge of competenl critic teachers. Eegular work 
in observation ami methods will be offered for students in the general 

, .Hid the work of the model school will he used in the regular College 

in agricultural education. Courses offered in Agricultural Educa- 
tion will include Principles and Methods of Education, Rural Education, 



I 



—9— 

Secondary Education, and School Administration. This will enable us to 
serve directly the rural teacher, the grade teacher, the agricultural high 
school teacher, and the school administrator. The Model School provides the 
laboratory opportunity of demonstrating the best in educational methods. 

Boys' and Girls' Club Work. The growing interest in boys' and 
girls' club work and its rapid development throughout the state has lead 
to an arrangement by which Professor Bishop and his assistants will give 
special lectures and demonstrations during the Summer Session. The work 
given will enable students to get a sufficient understanding to organize and 
carry forward club work in their respective communities. 

Library. The library of the Iowa State College while not unusually 
la roe is well selected and it is so managed as to make it serviceable to all 
students during the Summer Session. 

Equipment. The equipment of the Iowa State College for work in agri- 
culture, home economics, manual training and related subjects is in keeping 
with the wealth and resources of the State. In many respects, the Sum- 
mer Session is the best season of the year for studying agriculture and 
the regular college instructors in charge of the work use freely the re- 
sources of the college and the experiment station. 

Location. Ames is almost at the geographical center of the state of 
Iowa, on the main line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad. It is 
about thirty-five miles north of Des Moines, with which it is connected by 
a branch line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad and by the Fort 
Dodge, Des Moines and Southern (interurban) running from Fort Dodge 
and Rockwell City to Des Moines. A branch of the Chicago & Northwestern 
from Ames penetrates the northern part of the state. Ames is proverbially 
a clean town, saloons and billiard halls being unheard of. 

Students should plan to arrive on Saturday or Monday. In case 
it is absolutely necessary to arrive on Sunday, advanced notice should be 
given, with the request that rooms be arranged for, at least temporarily. 
In case of arrival on Sunday, without advanced notice, phone 652, the 
residence phone of the Director of the Summer Session. 

Rural Life Conference. The Kural Life Conference will open on Mon- 
day, June 19th, and close Friday evening, June 30th. The last three days 
will be in the form of a convention and will be of special interest to rural 
ministers and to residents and teachers of rural communities. 

In the past, this conference has been most helpful to Iowa and neighbor- 
ing states in stimulating and developing rural leadership. Speakers of note 
from the state and nation will appear before the conference. 

The lectures in the Rural Life Conference are free to Summer Session 
students as well as members of the Conference. For special bulletin giving 
detailed program of the Conference, write Dean Chas. F. Curtiss, Chairman 
of the Rural Life Conference Committee, or the Director of the Summer 
Session. 

LEGAL PROVISIONS OF INTEREST TO TEACHERS 

A large part of the w T ork offered in the Summer Session is arranged in 
direct response to recent legislation. Work is therefore arranged to meet 
legal requirements. The law r s of the state encouraging work in agricul- 
ture, home economics and manual training are in common with similar laws 
throughout the entire United States. The movement for the industrial 
work in the schools is not local nor is it transitory. It is gathering force 
each year. It is simply the recognition of the fact that education to be 
effective must be connected up directly with the work and dominant in- 
terests of the people. The government census show's that 68% of the 
people of Iowa are rural and that 49.2% are actually living upon farms. 
This makes agriculture the one dominant occupation of the state. For 
women, of course, home economics is the one great interest but women 
living on the farm are almost equally interested in farm operations. While 



-10— 



Iowa is not a large manufacturing state at present, the output of factories 
is increasing steadily each year. Industry in one form or another takes 
most of the time of every one and there is no reason why our education 
should not connect up more and more with industry which shall put joy 
and satisfaction as well as scientific insight into all industrial and manual 
occupations. 

Any county superintendent can instruct teachers as to the legal require- 
ments or the requirements of the State Educational Board of Examiners 
with reference to the new subjects or with reference to the six weeks or 
twelve weeks of Normal Training. The Summer Session of the Iowa State 
College is accredited for work in all of these lines. Agriculture, home 
economics and manual training are the subjects in which the Iowa State 
College of all institutions is prepared to help teachers. 




! 



OFFICERS AND FACULTY 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

D. D. Murphy, President, Elkader. 
W. C. Stuckslager, Lisbon. 

Geo. T. Baker, Davenport. 

Paul E. Stillman, Jefferson. 

Frank F. Jones, Villisca. 

P. K. Holbrook, Onawa. 

Chas. R. Brenton, Dallas Center. 

Edw. P. Schoentgen, Council Bluffs. 

H. M. Eicher, Washington. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 
W. P. Boyd, Chairman, Cedar Rapids. 
Thomas Lambert, Sabula. 
W. H. Gemmill, Secretary, Des Moines. 

AUDITOR AND INSPECTORS 
Jackson W. Bowdish, Auditor and Accountant, Des Moines. 
P. E. McClenahan, Inspector of Secondary Schools, Des Moines. 
John E. Foster, Assistant Inspector, Des Moines. 
L. I. Reed, Assistant Inspector, Des Moines. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 
Raymond A. Pearson, President, Central Building. 

E. W. Stanton, Vice-President, Central Building. 

G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session, Agricultural Hall. 
Herman Knapp, Treasurer and Registrar, Central Building. 

SUMMER SESSION COUNCIL 
Raymond A. Pearson, President. 
C. F. Curtiss, Dean of Agriculture. 
A. Marston, Dean of Division of Engineering. 
R. E. Buchanan, Acting Dean, Division of Science. 
Catherine J. MacKay, Acting Dean of Division of Home Economics. 
G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session, Hall of Agriculture. 

PROFESSORS 

Robert Earle Buchanan Bacteriology 

Orange Howard Cessna Psychology 

\\*. F. Coover Chemistry 

.1. < '. Cunningham General Agriculture 

H. H. Kildee Animal Husbandry 

Gilmour Beyers MacDonald Forestry 

'■. «.. Morbeck Forestry 

Martin Mortensen Dairy 

H. B. Hunger Farm Management 

A. B. Noble English 

Louis Hermann Pammel Botany 

W. H. Pew Animal Husband ry 

Louia Bevier Spinney Physics 

William Henry Stevenson Soils 

M. G. Thornburg Animal Husbandry 

George Melvin Turpin Poultry 

'■. M. Wilson Agricultural Education 



—12— 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 



C. E. Bartholomew 

Iva Brant 

George A. Chaney 

F. E. Colburn 

Julia T. Colpitts 

F. H. Culley 

H. L. Eichling 

Myrtle Ferguson 

E. F. Ferrin 

Genevieve Fisher 

C. C. Fowler 

Jaffrey Carl Harris 

William Ray Heckler 

John C. Ise 

John Nathan Martin 

C. W. Mayser 

R. R. Renshaw 

Louis Bernard Schmidt 

W. E. Sealock 

Fredrica V. Shattuck 

P. S. Shearer 

R. E. Smith 

L. A. Test 

H. W. Vaughan 

George H. Von Tungeln 

H. H. Walter 

John Anderson Wilkinson 



Zoology 

Home Economics 

Mathematics 

Photography 

Mathematics 

Horticulture 

General Agriculture 

Home Economics 

Animal Husbandry 

Home Economics 

Chemistry 

Music 

Farm Crops 

Economic Science 

Botany 

Physical Training 

Chemistry 

History 

Agricultural Education 

Public Speaking 

Animal Husbandry 

Soils 

Chemistry 

Animal Husbandry 

Economic Science 

Physical Training 

Chemistry 



G. J. Fink 
H. H. Gibson 
L. S. Gillette 
F. M. Harrington 
John Hug 

E. W. Lehman 
Max Levine 
Clvde McKee 
C\ A. Olson 

F. L. Overley 
H. J. Plagge 
Raymond Rogers 
A.W. Rudnick 
Lora Thompson 
T. R. Truax 

T. F. Vance 



C. W. Beese 
.1. Lawrence Eason 
Ruth Edgerton 
K. McGregor 
Peter Hansen 
G. E. Linden 
Elizabeth Me Kim 
Wylle B. McNeill 
ll. W. Richey 
K. M. Snangler 
o. C. [Jfford 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 
Chemistry 

Agricultural Education 
Animal Husbandry 
Horticulture 
Mechanical Engineering 
Agricultural Engineering 
Bacteriology 
Farm Crops 

Mechanical Engineering 
General Agriculture 
Physics 

Physical Training 
Dairy 

Home Economics 
Forestry 
Psychology 

INSTRUCTORS 

Mechanical Engineering 
■English 

Physical Culture 
Animal Husbandry 
General Agriculture 
Physical Training 
Mathematics 
1 1 oino Economics 
Horticulture 
Mechanical Engineering 
Poultry 



—13— 

F. S. Wilkins Farm Crops 
Mrs. E. S. Youtz English 

D. H. Zentmire General Agriculture 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
Jaffrey Carl Harris 
Mrs. J. C. Harris 

LIBEAEY 
Lynn Andrus 
Amy W. Noll 

LABOEATOEY ASSISTANTS 
J. W. Bowen Chemistry 

SPECIAL INSTEUCTOES 

E. S. Baird Manual Training 
Supervisor of Manual Training, Newton, Iowa. 

Mary Brady Home Economics 

State Normal School, Stevens Point, Wis. 
Anna L. Burdick Vocational Education 

Director Vocational Guidance, Des Moines City Schools. 
W. T. Giese Manual Training 

Supervisor of Manual Training, Ames Public Schools. 

G. G. Gunderson Writing 
Supervisor of Writing, Boone Public Schools. 

Johanna M. Hansen Domestic Art 

Supervisor of Art Instruction, Sioux City Public Schools. 

Tura Hawk Poultry 

Ames, Iowa. 

F. W. Hicks Didactics 
Superintendent of Schools, Ames, Iowa. 

Jessie M. Himes Critic Teacher 

Principal, Charlevoix County Normal School, Charlevoix, Mich. 
Kramer J. Hoke Agricultural Education 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Eichmond, Va. 
A. P. Laughlin Manual Training 

Supervisor Manual Training, Peoria, 111. 
Pearl McCaslin Arithmetic 

Special Teacher of Arithmetic, Connersville, Ind. 
J. E. Moore Manual Training 

Superintendent of Schools, Spring Valley, Minn. 
F. P. Eeed U. S. History 

Superintendent of Schools, Osceola, Iowa. 
Sarah Francis Eowan Home Economics 

Director of Extension Home Economics, Columbus, Miss. 
Bertha C. Stiles Primary Critic Teacher 

Primary Supervisor, Hibbing, Minn. 
Anna Tjaden Manual Training 

Assistant Superintendent Manual Training, Peoria, 111. 
David Williams Orthography 

Superintendent of Schools, Winterset, Iowa. 



GENERAL COURSES 

High School teachers are more and more interested in securing regular 
college credit work in agriculture, so that the general course for high school 
teachers is no longer continued. Superintendents and high school teachers 
can secure a combination of work in different departments which will en- 
able them to secure a general view of the subject in a single summer if 
necessary. However, for rural and grade teachers, and for farmers, busi- 
ness men and home-makers, general courses are continued. 

GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

S-2. Agriculture. Each summer there have been a few farmers and 
business men and women desiring to get a general knowledge of the funda- 
mentals of agriculture from the combined scientific and practical point of 
view. The demands of such individuals vary so much that it is necessary 
to take up each case and arrange a schedule accordingly. While one will 
desire to devote his full time to a study of farm animals, another will de- 
sire all of his time on the study of soils or plants or orcharding. It has 
been found possible to meet these demands quite fully and to give a com- 
bination of work which will enable each individual to get economically the 
practical information which he desires. Since those asking for this partic- 
ular course do not ask for college credit, they are given considerable free- 
dom, the sole purpose being to meet their demand in a satisfactory way. 
It is suggested that individuals knowing before hand that they will ask 
for this course write somewhat in detail the work which they desire. This 
will give an opportunity for consultation in arranging the course satis- 
factorily. 

HOMEMAKERS' COURSE 

The division of Home Economics will offer beginning and continuation 
courses of a very practical nature for homemakers of the state who may 
desire to take advantage of the summer work. This work has always been 
very popular because of its intensely practical nature and this summer it has 
been decided to offer all courses coordinately, that is, without any prere- 
quisite requirements. It will be further observed that some of these 
courses arc arranged in such way as to devote two weeks to a particular 
subject. This will make it possible for women from the home who can 
come only for two weeks to get a definite unit of work. The description 
of the homemakers' courses follows herewith: 

8 30. Dressmaking. Especially designed for women who wish to do 
home sewing. It will include the alteration and use of commercial patterns, 
pattern making, designing, copying good styles and garment making. Lec- 
tures will be given each week on COStume, good and bad taste in dress, 
renovation, care of clothing, etc. A choice will be given in the garment to 
be made including underwear, blouses, tailored dress. 

8-31. Textiles, Millinery, Clothing. This course includes three sep- 
arate Courses. It is planned for students who are ('Specially interested iii 
some one line of work, and is arranged so that any one of the courses may 
be taken alone if desired. Two weeks each will be given to each of the 
following : 

I. I've of the dress form in home sewing. Work consist s of padding and 
fitting up a form, and draping and modeling on the form. 

'J. Millinery. Demonstrations and laboratory work on methods of mak- 
ing frames, trimming of hats and the making of flowers and bows. 



—15— 

3. Textiles. Including a microscopic study of the textile fibers; de- 
velopment and growth of the textile industry; adulterations of tex- 
tile fabrics; common weaves and familiarity with the names of the 
common material found on the market today. 
• s 35. Cookery. This course is to be divided into three periods of two 
uvi ks each so that those who wish may take the full six weeks work or 
any one or two of the two w T eeks periods. 

The first period will include the cooking of meats and the prepara- 
tion of appetizing dishes from left over meals. 

The second period, the cooking of vegetables and cereals and methods 
of reheating these foods. 

The third period, the making of quick breads, yeast breads, and the 
preparation of beverages. 
S-36. Cookery. Discussion of different types of table service including 
the preparation and serving of typical meals, illustrating suitable food 
combinations. Food adapted to the needs of children during different 
periods of growth will be considered as well as the preparation, selection 
and serving of foods for the sick. 

S-40. Home Problems. This course is designed for women who do not 
wish to enter for laboratory work but desire to secure information along 
the lines of the latest developments in household problems, and who desire 
a scientific basis for home practices. Discussions of selection, preparation 
and use of foods and clothing will be accompanied by demonstrations and 
illustrations. Provision will be made for informal discussion. School and 
public sanitation and hygiene as problems relating to the life and health of 
the family will be considered. Problems of the home, its plan, decoration, 
care and management will be considered and modern household appliances 
and conveniences illustrated or demonstrated. The lectures and discussions 
of the rural life conference will be open to women entered in this course. 

RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSE 
Tuition Free 

(Students who are high school graduates may take college credit work 
upon payment of the fee). 

This course is offered to enable rural and grade teachers to have the ad- 
vantages of the unusual facilities of the Iowa State College in preparation 
for teaching agriculture, home economics, and manual training in the public 
schools in an intelligent and effective manner. The instruction will empha- 
size the elementary side of the subjects, giving particular attention to 
methods of preparing material, and of organizing the work in rural schools. 
The laboratories and teaching equipment of the college, including the 
library and the experiment farms, will be available to the students, but the 
aim throughout will be to so handle the work as to illustrate the possibilities 
of doing the work effectively under rural school conditions. The primary 
objedt of the course is to give work in the industrial subjects to present 
and prospective teachers, and other work will be offered only when carried 
along with industrial work. 

The work is arranged to meet legal requirements. 

Admission to this course requires graduation from the common 
schools and the recommendation of the county superintendent of 
schools. 

This course makes provision for the following work: 

1- General Agriculture S-3. This course is planned after consultation 
with the state department so as to meet the requirements of teachers who 
are preparing to teach agriculture in the rural and grade schools. The 
course will deal with the phases of agriculture that can be taught to the 
best advantage in the rural schools and will consist of class, laboratory ami 
demonstration work. Topics included in this beginning course of six weeks 




C/3 



—17— 

are soils and soil fertility, culture and improvement of crops, especially of 
corn, seed corn selection, storing, testing, and judging, weeds and weed 
eradication, bacteria, fungi and insects, orchards and orcharding, garden- 
ing for home and school, the propagation of plants and related topics suit- 
able for rural schools. 

-. General Agriculture S-4. This is a continuation of the course de- 
scribed in the paragraph above. Topics dealt with are farm animals, in- 
cluding horses, cattle, sheep and swine but with particular emphasis upon 
poultry. Poultry is considered by the state department and others as a 
topic particularly adapting itself for treatment in the rural and grade 
schools. The course will give the student a definite knowledge of the quali- 
ties to expect in good stock and will consider selection, improvement, care 
and management. Attention will also be given to dairying including the 
use of the Babcock test. 

3. Home Economics S-38. This is the introductory course for rural 
and grade teachers. The work will be done under conditions and with 
equipment that can be easily duplicated in the rural schools. For part of 
the work a specially devised rural school home economics cabinet will be 
used. The emphasis will be placed upon the planning of a suitable course 
of lessons, demonstration with the pupils of the model school as a class, 
lesson planning, cooperation with the home and necessary equipment. The 
purpose is to give the teacher a definite plan so that she will willingly 
carry out the work in her school next winter. 

4. Home Economics S-32. Sewing. This course carries forward the 
sewing work done in S-38 and is intended to give the teacher a more 
thorough knowledge of the subject. The emphasis will be upon plain sew- 
ing but help will be given upon the selection and use of materials, and the 
practical work of cutting, fitting, finishing and repairing of garments. 

5. Home Economics S-37. Cooking. This course is a continuation 
of the cooking work in S-38. It is intended to give a more thorough 
knowledge and is adapted throughout to the work in the rural schools. 
Subjects treated are food preparation, serving of meals, economical menus 
and other work according to the interest and ability of the class. The 
work in this course will be done in the regular college laboratories. 

6. Home Economics S-48. Conferences. Arranged for high school 
and grade teachers of Home Economics. Attention to advanced methods, 
equipment, texts, and organization of the course of study on modern basis. 

7. General Manual Training S-6. The introductory course of six 
weeks in general manual training will deal with the rougher and more 
practical farm problems and includes such exercises as work bench, saw 
horse, bench hook, nail box, corn tray, bird house, hog trough, milking 
stool, bench vice, seed sample case, chicken brooder, etc. Because of the 
bulky nature of the models in the exercises undertaken in this course ma- 
terials will be "furnished without a fee and at the close of the course students 
will be given an option to purchase the models at actual cost of material. 

8. General Manual Training S-7. This will be a continuation of gen- 
eral manual training S-6 but will deal more particularly with farm home 
problems. The exercises will require more refined work and a higher de- 
gree of finish and will include the necessary basis in drawings and reading 
of the same. The following are some of the exercises which will be un- 
dertaken: Book rack, plant stand, waste basket, medicine case, hall tree, 
porch swing, bulletin case, screen, small step ladder, sleeve board, fly trap, 
etc. The work will be accompanied by readings, lectures and demonstra- 
tions. Double period daily. 

9. Manual Training S-14. Art and Light Metal-Work. Models and 
tool processes will be selected from the standpoint of their service to pub- 
lic school teachers. Among the tool processes taught will be etching, bor- 
ing, sawing, cutting with file and chisel, upsetting, bending, planishing, 
hardening, tempering, annealing, fastening with rivets, bolts, screws, solder- 
ing, brazing, coloring and lacquering. A special feature of the work will 
be a design of all processes made. 



-18- 



10. Manual Training S-15. Basketry and Weaving. The work in this 
course carries a double purpose; first, to give ability in organizing 
such work for the lower grades in school, and, second, to give actual prac- 
tice in performing processes that are useful in the school and that are 
personally useful to the individual. 

Note: Teachers will be interested in knowing of the ruling of the state educational 
board of examiners to the effect that grades in agriculture, home economics, and man- 
ual training when carried successfully for 12 weeks may be transferred direct to the 
certificate without further examination. 

Home economics students are requested to wear wash dresses in the cooking lab- 
oratories. White aprons, hand towels and holders will also be required. 




Rural and Grade Teachers in Manual Training, 1915. "The Start' 



11. Didactics. The work in didactics for rural and grade teachers will 
Ik- further developed during the coming Summer Session to meet the in- 
creasing demands of high grade teachers who have been continuing in the 
rural and grade teachers' course. Three courses will be offered as follows: 

Didactics I. A general course of didactics having in mind the prepara- 
tion of the teacher for school work and for passing the examination. The 
course will deal with management, study, and the technique of the recitation. 

Didactics II. Special methods in arithmetic, geography and history 
for the upper grades. Some attention to other subjects. 

Didactics III. Primary methods with particular attention to primary 
reading, busy work, and the special problems of the primary teacher. 

12. Other Certificate Subjects. Other subjects for rural and grade 
teachers, as required for the first, grade certificate, will be available for part 
tunc along with industrial subjects. All subjects will be taught by com- 
I etent teachers. 

In handling the work of the common branches, the effort is to give a 

good pedagogical view of each subject, thus meeting fully the requirements 

of the State Educational Board of Examiners with reference to these sub- 

The courses arc no1 review courses and ye1 experience indicates 

that the type of work given is the best review, even for examination, as it 

ood comprehensive teacher's view of any particular subject. 



-19— 



For lack of space, description of the other certificate subjects are not 
given herewith hut there is no hesitation in announcing that the work in 
each subjecl is on a thoroughly progressive and helpful hasis. 

Work is offered in algebra, civics, drawing, economics, geography, history, 
music, orthography, penmanship, physics, physical training, reading, and 
writing. 

Rural and grade teachers coming for a single Summer Session are urged 
to take advantage of all of the industrial work that it is possible to get 
in the course. A teacher may meet the six weeks and twelve weeks re- 
quirements and still give very nearly all of the time to agriculture, home 
economics and manual training. Education must be taken to meet the re- 
quirements of the law, but that leaves a possibility of three-fourths of the 




Rural and Grade Teachers in Manual Training, 1915. "The Finish. 
(The Manual Training benches were made by the Students) 



time on industrial subjects. However, it may be better for a particular 
teacher to put some of the time on other subjects, as arithmetic, English, etc. 
The course is arranged to meet this need. 

FEES IN GENERAL COURSES 

There will be no fees in connection with the work for rural and grade 
teachers. In the industrial subjects, students may take the finished product 
"ii payment of the actual cost of materials used. 

The fees or deposits in the home-makers' courses have been estimated 
as follows: 

Home Economies S-30 Pee, $1.00 

Home Economics S-31 Fee. $1.00 

Home Economics S-35 Pee, $3.00 

Home Economics 8-36 Fee, $3.00 

Home Economics S-40 Fee, $2.00 



COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 

There are many who wish to take some of the regular college courses 
either because of the intrinsic value of the work to them in a practical way 
or as a part of a regular college course to be completed later. 

The courses described below are the same as those offered during the 
college year and will be taught by the regular college faculty. The descrip- 
tions are quoted from the regular College Catalog. 

As the Summer Session is approximately one-third the length of a college 
semester, the number of hours per week devoted to a course in the Summer 
Session will be three times what is shown in the descriptions below. 
Six hours per week constitutes full work in these college courses. There is 
little doubt but that the numbers in each course will justify offering it. 

A resolution adopted by the Iowa Council of Education indicated about 
thirty-two hours of technical agriculture of a college grade as the minimum 
for a regular teacher of agriculture in the high school. This amount of 
work will easily be secured in successive Summer Sessions. The work in 
agriculture offered during the summer of 1916 includes additional courses 
to meet further demands for agriculture. The prospective student who is 
looking forward to several Summer Sessions in succession is advised to plan 
his work so as to cover the field in a reasonable manner and meet the min- 
imum requirements as suggested by the Iowa Council of Education. 

AGBICULTUKAL EDUCATION 

1. Methods of Teaching. The technique of the recitation; types of 
lessons and the standards for judging them; the selection and organization 
of subject matter; the basis for re-adjusting the curriculum to make room 
for new types of school work; efficiency in the managing of the study period. 
Recitations 2; credit 2. 

2. Principles of Education. The biological, sociological, psychological 
basis of education; aims and values in the curriculum, with particular ref- 
erence to industrial and vocational subjects. Eecitations 2; credit 2. 

3. Development of the Industrial High School. The sources and 
development of the high school curriculum with particular reference to the 
industrial and vocational subjects. Recitations 2 ; credit 2. 

5. Educational History. The history of education with reference to 
its bearing upon the solution of present educational problems, especially 
problems of industrial and vocational education. It is re-directed study de- 
signed to be of real value to our students. Chief emphasis upon the mod- 
ern movement. Recitations 2 ; credit 2. 

7. Vocational Education. The course will deal with the development 
of and the present day best practices with reference to vocational educa- 
tion, pre vocational education, and vocational guidance. This course will 
be in charge of Mrs. Anna L. Burdick of Des Moines, who will use in it her 
masterful analysis of Iowa conditions. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

K. Rural Education. The study of rural education with particular 
reference to the interests of the county superintendent, the normal training 
teacher, and the superintendent or teacher in the consolidated or village 
school. 

LOa. School Administration. Supervision of the curriculum. Contin- 
uation of LO. Deals with the problem of adjusting and supervising the cur- 
riculum in order to facilitate proper progress of children through the grades. 
This course will be taughl by Dr. Hoke, Asst. Supt. of Schools, Richmond, 
V;i.. who carried the preceding course last year. 



—21— 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

.3. Farm Machinery and Farm Motors. Mechanics and materials; 
the measurement and transmission of power; development, construction, 
functions and methods of operating, adjusting and repairing farm machinery 
and farm motors; the principles of draft and the production of power. 
Laboratory work is devoted to the study of construction, operation, adjust- 
ment and testing of machines discussed in the class room. Recitations 2; 
lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 2% ; fee $2.00. 

19. Rural Sanitary Equipment. A brief study of lighting, heat- 
Ing and ventilation systems for farm buildings; sanitary construction, 
plumbing, systems of water supply and sewage disposal. A. E. 36 may ac- 
company this as a laboratory. Rec. 1 ; credit 1. 

21. Cement Construction. The use of cement in farm buildings con- 
struction. Cement testing; study mixtures; construction of forms, rein- 
forcements. Also other building materials. Recitation and lab. 1, 2 hr. ; 
credit 1; fee $2.00. 

36. Rural Sanitary Equipment Laboratory. Laboratory course to ac- 
company or follow A. E. 19. Open as an elective for agricultural students. 
Lab. 1, 2 hr. period; credit %; fee $1.50. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

1. Types and Market Classes of Beef Cattle and Sheep. Judging 
of different market classes of beef cattle, and mutton and wool, sheep. 
Recitation 1; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $2.00. 

2. Types and Market Classes of Dairy Cattle, Horses and Swine. 
Judging different market classes of dairy cattle, light and heavy horses, and 
(bacon and fat) swine. Recitation 1; lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 2; fee $2.00. 

3. Breed Studies of Beef Cattle and Sheep. Judging representatives 
of different breeds according to their official standards; a study of their 
origin, history, characteristics, and adaptability to different conditions of 
climate and soil. Prerequisite 1; recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3^; 
fee $2.00. 

4. Breed Studies of Dairy Cattle, Horses and Swine. Judging of 
representatives of different breeds according to their official standards, a 
study of their origin, history, characteristics, and adaptability to different 
conditions of climate and soil. Prerequisite 2; recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr.; 
credit 3^ ; fee $2.00. 

20. Animal Feeding. Composition and digestibility of feeding stuffs; 
the preparation of coarse fodders; the grinding, steaming and cooking of 
feeding stuffs; feeding standards and calculation of rations; feeding for 
meat, milk, wool, growth and work. Prerequisites, Chem. 151, 351 or 408; 
recitations 2; credit 2. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

1. General Bacteriology. Morphology, classification, physiology, and 
cultivation of bacteria, relation of bacteria to health of man and animals, to 
infection, contagion, immunity, and to other scientific and agricultural 
problems. Laboratory work on methods of cultivating bacteria and the 
study of bacterial functions and activities, content of air, water, and food, 
with interpretation of results reached. Prerequisite, Organic Chemistry; 
recitations 2; labs. 3, 2 hr. ; credit 4; fee $5.00. 

15. General Bacteriology for Students in Animal Husbandry. A 
discussion of general bacteriology followed by study of the relationship of 
bacteria to agriculture with particular reference to the live stock industry. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 251; recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 2^; fee $4.00. 

18. General Bacteriology and Fermentations for Students in Home 
Economics. Bacteria in their relations to the home, including a brief con- 
sideration of the pathogenic forms and the bacteria, yeasts and molds in 
their zymotic activities. 



This course will prove of particular value to teachers of Home Economics. 
of Biology, or of Physiology in high schools. Such topics as the following 
are considered: The scientific basis for food preservation and canning, 
bacteria and yeasts useful in bread making, food fermentation, clean and 
dirty milk, bacteria that cause diseases and how they are spread, etc. Pre- 
requisite, organic chemistry; recitation 2; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3^; fee 
$5.00. 

30. Research in General and Systematic Bacteriology. For grad- 
uate students. Professor Buchanan. Prerequisite 1 and 30 or equivalent; 
credit 3 to 5; fee $5.00. 

BOTANY 

It is the object of botany to make the student familiar with the common 
plants about him — weeds, trees and flowers. The summer months offer an 
exceptionally favorable time for such work. The Summer Session work is 
adapted to the needs of the high school teacher of the subject. 

60. Botany of Weeds. Injury to farm, garden and horticultural crops; 
origin and distribution of weeds. Some preliminary work on the mor- 
phology of flowering plants is advisable, though not necessary. Becitation 
1; lab. 1, 2 hrs. ; credit 1%; fee $3.00. 

61. Morphology. Flowering plants with special reference to the or- 
gan, cells and tissues. Kecitation 1; lab. 1, 2 hrs.; credit 1^; fee $2.00. 

70. Systematic Phaneogams. Flowering plants; historical survey of 
various systems of classification study of groups by means of some repre- 
sentatives. Some preliminary work on the Morphology of flowering plants 
is advisable. Credit 3 to 5; fee $3.00. 

CHEMISTRY 

103. General Chemistry. Engineering students. Principles and a 
study of the non-metallic elements. Lectures 2; recitation 1; lab. 1, 3 hr. ; 
credit 4 ; deposit $6.00. 

104. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. Engineering 
students. Continuation of 103. The metallic elements, their separation ami 
identification, in the last half of the semester lectures will be given on 
special chemical subjects related to engineering problems. Lectures 2; 
labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 4; deposit $7.50. 

107. General Chemistry. Agricultural students. Principles and the 
non-metallic elements. Lectures 2; recitations 1; Labs. 2, 2 hr. or :i hr. ; 
credit 4|^ or 5; deposit $6.00. 

L08. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. Agricultural 
students. Continuation of 107. The metallic elements, their separation 
and identification. Lectures 2; recitations 1; labs. 2, 2 hr. or 3 hr. ; credit 
4/ 5 or 5; deposit $7.50. 

L09. General Chemistry. Home Economics students. Principles and 
the non-metallic elements. Lectures 2; recitations 1; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 
4/ ? ; deposit $6.00. 

11". General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. Home Economics 
students. Continuation of 109. The metallic elements, their separation and 
identification. Lectures 1; recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit .'l'<; deposit 
.+ 7..-.0. 

173. Summer Practice for Chemical Engineering Students. Cue 

hundred and seventy hours of summer practice in quantitative analysis. 

Required of students specializing in chemical engineering and applied (diem 
istry during the summer between second ami third years. 

351. Applied Organic Chemistry. Physical and chemical properties 
ami methods of preparation of important classes of organic compounds; 

the composition of plaid and animal Itodies; the proximate principles of 

and the chemical changes which occur during digestion. Prerequisite 
; lab. 1. 2 hr. ; credit :; • .; deposit $6.00. 



—23— 

352. Agricultural Analysis. Principles of gravimetric and volumetric 
analysis; the analysis of milk, grain, and mill feeds and fodders. Prere- 
quisite 351; lectures and recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 3j^ ; deposit 
$7.50. 

375. Applied Organic Chemistry. Consideration of organic chem- 
istry with special reference to Home Economics. Study, estimation and 
preparation of some of the more important compounds. Serves as a foun- 
dation for physiological chemistry. Prerequisite 110; lectures 2; recitation 
1 : labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 4^; deposit $7.50. 

376. Food Chemistry. Consideration of constituents entering into 
composition of foods with quantitative estimation. Methods of analysis 
of foods; milk, butter, oleomargarine, ice cream, cereal foods, detection of 
coloring matter and food preservatives. Prerequisite 376; lectures 2; labs. 
2. 2 hr. ; credit 3^; deposit $7.50. 

t"... Physiological Chemistry. Home Economics Students. Chem- 
istry of the human body, its food, organic and inorganic and the changes 
which these undergo during the process of nutrition. Prerequisite 376; 
recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3^; deposit $7.50. 

DAIRYING 

10. Domestic Dairying. Nutritive and economic value of milk; its 
dietetics and hygiene; market milk, infants' milk, invalids' milk, cream, 
ice cream, condensed milk, milk chocolates, malted milk, dried milk, fer- 
mented milks (Kephir, Koumissete), buttermilk, butter and cheese. Demon- 
strations are given in types of butter and cheese and in testing the purity 
of milk and butter. Lectures and labs. 2 ; credit 2 hrs. ; fee $2.50. 

12. Farm Dairying. Secretion, composition, testing, separation and 
acidity of milk, preparation of starters, ripening of cream, churning and 
packing butter. Eecitations 2, lab. 1, 2 hrs.; credit 2y 3 hrs.; fee $3.00. 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE 

1. Money and Banking. The principles of money, coinage, paper cur- 
rency, bimetallism; gold and silver production, monetary standards and 
price levels. History and principles of banking, with a consideration of 
financial crises and banking problems, including agricultural credit. Eeci- 
tations 2 ; credit 2. 

10. Agricultural Economics. Historical and comparative agricultural 
systems; land tenure, size of farms; co-operation; taxation; prices; trans- 
portation; marketing; land credit; the relation of the state to agriculture. 
Recitations 3; credit 3. 

24. Rural Sociology. A course of special interest to teachers and 
superintendents. The means of development of country life by way of a 
rural reconstruction through adaptation of existing local institutions, and 
state and community activities. Rural population as to density, vital 
statistics, sanitation migration or the cityward trend, nationality, standard 
of living. Social institutions, such as the rural church, rural schools, clubs, 
libraries, facilities for entertainment, wider use of school and church plants, 
social centers, social surveys, with the possible improvement and extension. 
A comparison of country with city respecting the age, birth rate, longevity, 
race, marriage, divorce, education, moral character, vice, criminality, the 
need for specialized leadership or willingness on the part of certain in- 
dividuals to serve as leaders; public opinion; thrift, and standard of living: 
economic, legal, political and social factors affecting tin 1 quantity ami 
quality of the population. Recitations 3; credit 3. 

ENGLISH 
10. Narration and Description. Expository and suggestive description ; 
better vocabulary through search for the specific word; simple and coin 
plex narrative, with incidental description; plot and characterization; se 




MM 



curing interest, as well as clearness and good order; analysis of good 
models. Themes almost daily, to train the student to apply the principles 
studied. Recitations 3; credit 3; fee 25 cents. 

11. Exposition. Principles and methods of expository writing; logical 
basis in definition and division; different types of exposition, with study of 
models; careful attention to the construction of paragraphs and the mak- 
ing of plans and outlines; a short theme almost daily, with longer ones oc- 
casionally, constant emphasis on the application of the principles studied. 
Recitations 3 ; credit 3 ; fee 25 cents. 

412. Argumentation. The two methods, the inductive and the de- 
ductive, of drawing inferences and establishing truth ; how to detect fal- 
lacies and how to guard against them ; abstracting, collating, and classi- 
fying arguments on both sides of some live question of present importance; 
organizing a large mass of material and developing it into a logical brief ; 
analysis of good models ; writing f orensics. Recitations 2 ; credit 2 ; fee 
25 cents. 

FARM CROPS 

1. Corn Production. Structure and adaptation of the corn plant; 
methods of selecting, storing, testing, grading, planting, cultivating and 
harvesting. Cost of production, uses of the crop, commercial marketing, 
insects and diseases. Field study of corn with reference to per cent stand 
and correlation of the parts of the stalk. Laboratory study of the struc- 
ture of the stalk, ear and kernel. Scoring and judging of single and ten 
ear samples. Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hrs. ; credit 2^; fee $1.00. 

2. Small Grain Production. Oats, wheat (winter and spring) barley, 
rye, emmer, speltz; their botanical structure, soil and climatic adaptations, 
seed selection, seed bed preparation and seeding, harvesting, uses, insects 
and diseases. Laboratory study of plants of each small grain crop ; scor- 
ing, judging, and market grading of the different grains. Recitations 2; 
lab. 1, 2 hrs.; credit 2%; fee $1.00. 

3. Corn and Small Grain Judging. Judging samples of the different 
varieties of corn and small grain, market grading, also a study of the 
origin, characteristics and adaptation of the standard grain varieties. Lab. 
1, 2 hrs. ; recitation and lab. 1, 2 hrs. ; credit 2 ; fee $2.00. 

33. Forage Crop Production. Grasses, legumes and other plants suit- 
able for pasture, hay, silage and soiling. Botanical structure, soil and 
climatic adaptation, cultural and harvesting methods, and uses of the dif- 
ferent forage plants. Identification of the plants, their seed and the com- 
mon adulterants. Recitation 2; lab. 1, 2 hrs.; credit 2. 2 / 3 ; fee $2.00. 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

2. Farm Management. Farming as a business; factors controlling the 
success of farming as found in farm surveys; types of farming, farm lay- 
out, forms of tenure and leases, organization and management of success- 
ful farms. Lectures and recitations 2 ; laboratory 1, 2 hrs. ; credit 2^ ; 
fee $1.00. 

FORESTRY 

Summer School Work in Forestry: The Forestry summer school 
camp will doubtless be held in one of the large lumbering regions of the 
northwest. A region will be selected which will afford the maximum oppor- 
tunities for studying large logging and milling operations at first hand. The 
quality and extent of the natural timber is such as to make the region partic- 
ularly adaptable for work in estimating timber, and the wide variety of im- 
portant commercial species of trees will also make the region particularly 
well adapted for the other work of the forestry camp. The Department 
furnishes tents, cots, dishes, etc., and the students furnish their bedding and 
other personal effects. The camp work is divided into two semesters. The 
first six weeks' work includes Forestry 56, Camp Technique, and Forestry 
57, Applied Forest Mensuration; the second half, consisting also of six 



—26— 

weeks' work, will be spent in Forestry 36, Applied Lumbering, and Forestry 
58, Field Silviculture. For details, address G. B. MacDonald, Professor 
of Forestry. 

56. Camp Technique.* Personal equipment for camp life; cam]) and 
cooking equipment. Camp food. Eation lists for trips of different kinds. 
Useful knots. Practice in throwing various packing hitches. Emergency 
equipment in case of sickness or accident. First aid practice. Summer 
Camp. Field and demonstration work; credit 1. 

57. Applied Forest Mensuration.* The scaling of logs, the determining 
of the volume of other forest products, and the reconnaissance of timbered 
areas. Complete reconnaissance of a specified area, including the running 
of primary and secondary base lines, the estimating and mapping of the 
timber by types, the making of contour maps, the writing of forest descrip- 
tions by watersheds, etc. Summer Camp. Prerequisite 32 ; credit 4. 

36. Applied Lumbering.* Logging and milling operations, including 
a detailed study of each operation in the production of lumber. Tools and 
machines used, and costs of operations. The consideration of a specified 
tract of timber for logging; location of camps, roads, railroads, chutes. 
Equipment necessary, and estimated cost of each operation. Summer 
Camp. Prerequisite 54; credit 3. 

58. Field Silviculture.* Forest types, factors determining each. Type 
mapping. Natural reproduction of the forest under varying conditions. 
Improvement cuttings. Marking timber for cutting with reference to the 
silviculture systems. Summer Camp. Prerequisite 52 ; credit 3. 

* Courses given in the Summer Forestry Camp. • 

HISTORY 

14. The West in American History. A study of the settlement and 
development of the West from 1763 to the present time. The westward 
movement of population; sources, lines of advance, and areas of settlement; 
territorial acquisitions; public land policy; conditions of pioneer life; in- 
dustrial development; growth of democracy; rise of new problems; de- 
velopment of new institutions; and the influences of the West on national 
development. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

24. Economic History of American Agriculture. The development 
of agriculture as an industry from the simple isolated agricultural com- 
munities of the colonies of the complex agricultural system of today. Special 
attention will be given to the origin, growth, control, and disposition of the 
public domain; the westward movement in the conquest of free land; influ- 
ences affecting the growth of the agricultural industry and of agricultural 
society in the different sections; relation of agriculture to other industries; 
relation of the agricultural population to politics and legislation; and an his- 
torical and comparative study of some of the present day problems con- 
fronting the farming class, such as tenancy, farmers' organizations, markets, 
mid rural transportation. Recitation 2; credit 2. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

1. Sewing. Drafting of patterns and hand sewing, including stitches, 
darning, patching, the making of button holes, all of which will be applied 
to some useful garment. Recitation 1; lab. 2, 2 hrs.j credit "2v>\ fee 
$2.00. 

I. Sewing. Advanced drafting, hand and machine sewing, silk skirts, 
Blips, or tailored skirts, and tailored waists. Economical cutting of material, 

fitting of garments, and choice of materials from the standpoint of economy 

and beauty. Prerequisite 1; recitation 1; lal>s. 2, 2 Ins.; credit 2';; 

5.00. ' 

13. Food Preparation. In its scientific and economic aspect. Nutritive 

principles and the methods of cooking foods to retain them in digestible 

form; seising of foods in simple ami attractive form. Economy of money. 



time and labor. Prerequisite Chemistry 109; recitations 1; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; 
credit 2'. ; : fee $4.00. 

44. Food Preparation. Prerequisite 43; recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hrs . ; 
credit 2y 3 ; fee $4.00. 

45. Nutrition and Dietetics. Fundamental principles of human nutri- 
tion and the application of these principles under varying physiological, 
economic, and social conditions; laboratory problems in the planning and 
preparation of dietaries for various types of normal individuals in infancy, 
childhood, adolescence, adult life, and old age. For the family group with 
diverse conditions of activity, age, and financial circumstances. Prere- 
quisite Chem. 403, Zool. 13, "and H. E. 49; recitation 1; labs. 3, 2 hr. ; 
credit 3y 3 ; fee $6.00. 

46. Nutrition and Dietetics. Continuation of 45, with a study of 
therapeutic cookery and special attention to diet in disease. Prerequisite 
45; recitation 1; labs. 3, 2 hrs.; credit 2>y 3 ; fee $6.00. 

48. Cookery. Foods and their relation to the body; review of chem- 
istry and physiology of digestion; study of fermentation in its relation to 
fruit preservation. Marketing and serving and fruit preservation. Prac- 
tice in home cookery — study, planning, marketing, preparation and serving 
of meals. Prerequisites 44 and Chemistry 59 ; recitation 1 ; labs. 2, 2 
hr. ; credit 2y 3 ; fee $3.00. 

49. Cookery. Prerequisite 48; recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 
2y 3 ; fee $3.00. 

50. Theory of Design. Principles, color analysis, tone value, harmony, 
rhythm, balance, subordination. First applied to simple abstract problems 
of borders, surface patterns and regular spaces. Eecitation 1; labs. 2, 
2 hrs.; credit 2y 3 ; fee $1.00. 

51. Applied Design. Applied to rugs, book-covers, stained glass win- 
dows; leather, metal, wood-block prints and stencils applied to various use- 
ful articles. Prerequisite 50; recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 2]/ 3 ; 
fee $1.00. 

S-48. Conferences. Arranged for high school and grade supervisors of 
Home Economics. Attention to advanced methods, equipment, texts, and 
organization of the course of study on modern basis. No credit. 

HORTICULTUEE 

3. General Horticulture. Fruit growing and vegetable culture. Gen- 
eral exercises in propagation, planting and management of fruits and vege- 
tables. Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 2y 3 ; fee $1.00. 

408. Landscape Gardening. Fundamental principles and styles of 
the art ; planning of city, suburban and rural home grounds ; a consider- 
ation of public and semi-public property such as reservations, parks, school 
grounds, church yards, cemeteries, railroad station grounds; the planning 
and improvement of town and rural communities from the viewpoint of 
landscape gardening. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

104. Grapes and Small Fruits. Culture, harvesting and marketing 
of the strawberry, raspberry, grape, currant and other small fruits. Pre- 
requisites 3 or 38; recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 3. 

333. Truck Farming. Growing and marketing of the more important 
truck crops, such as the potato, cabbage, onion and tomato. The trucking 
interests of Iowa. Recitations 2 ; credit 2. 

38. Plant Propagation. Asexual and sexual methods ; germinat- 
ing, testing and storing of seed; multiplication of plants by cuttage, lay- 
erage and graftage, including nursery methods ami management. Prere- 
quisites Botany 68 and Chemistry 25; recitation 1; lectures and lab. 1, 2 
hr.; credit 2; fee $1.00. 



-28- 



LITEKATUBE 



22. Shakespeare. The great dramas. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

30. Literature of Modern Life. The major writers of the nineteenth 
century, with preliminary survey of the earlier periods; the Victorian period, 
with special attention to Browning, Carlyle, and one of the greater novelists. 
Recitations 2; credit 2. 

MATHEMATICS 

7a. Elementary Algebra as required by teachers preparing to take the 
examination for the first grade certificate. Text, Wells High School Al- 
gebra. Prerequisite, less than 1 year of High School Algebra. Recitations 
daily; credit only in R. and G. T. course. (Under direction of the Co-oper- 
ative Summer School). 

8a. Elementary Algebra. Prerequisite, 1 year of High School Algebra. 
Recitations daily; credit only in R. and G. T. course. (Under direction of 
the Co-operative Summer School). 

17. Algebra and Trigonometry. Definitions; functions of angles; 
derivation of trigonometric formulas with problems based on these formu- 
las; logarithms; solution of right and oblique triangles. Recitations 3; 
credit 3. 

43. Plane Analytic Geometry. Representation of points, lines and 
curves in a plane, careful study of the graphs of equations, and investiga- 
tion of the line, the circle, and the conic sections. Recitations 4; credit 4. 

45. Calculus. Differential calculus — expansion of functions, indeter- 
minate forms, tangents, normals, asymptotes, direction of curvature, points 
of inflexion, radius of curvature, envelopes, and maxima and minina; in- 
tegral calculus — applications made to determining areas, lengths of curves, 
surfaces of revolution, volumes of solids of revolution and other solids, 
applications of double integration to areas, surfaces, centers of gravity. 
Elements of differential equations. Prerequisite 44; recitations 5; credit 5. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

140. Manual Training. Care and adjustment of hand and power tools, 
joinery, cabinet making, wood finishing, polishing and varnishing, wood 
turning and carving. An elective course especially arranged for students 
in Industrial Science and women students in Home Economics who desire to 
prepare themselves to teach Manual Training. Lectures supplemented and 
illustrated by work in the shops. Credit l 2 /$. 

121. Mechanical Drawing. Use of drawing instruments, practice in 
lettering, and making working drawings. Credit 2 hours. 

181. Mechanical Drawing. The use of drawing instruments, making 
of working drawings. Credit 1. 

219. Projective Drawing. Principles of projection of the point, line, 
and plane as applied in the preparation of general and detail engineering 
drawings of machines and structures. Prerequisite 121 or 181; recitation 
1; lab. 1, 3 hrs.; credit 3. 

220. Projective Drawing. Same as 219 but less complete. Prere- 
quisite 121 or 181; recitation 1; lab. 1, 3 hrs.; credit 2. 

245. Vocational Wood Work. Advanced work in manual training for 
teachers; courses of instruction for rural and graded schools; detailed 
study of tools; bench and lathe work to meet needs of individual students. 
Prerequisite L40, or equivalent; lectures and Jab. 1, 4 hrs.; credit 1%; fee 
$2.00. 

331. Shop Work. Pattern work, principles of joinery, wood turning, 
;itul carving ;is applied to the making of simple patterns and core boxes 
for iron, brass, and aluminum castings. Credit 2; fee $5.00. 

nil. Mechanics of Engineering. Principles of pure mechanics as ap 
plied in engineering problems involving sbitics, graphics, and strength of 
materials. Prerequisite Math. II; recitations '■'<; credit 3. 



-29- 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



1. Practical Photography. A general course in Photography for 
teachers, county superintendents, supervisors, etc., including the following 

study: Lenses, cameras and their accessories; shutters, plates and films, 
and their manipulation; color filters and proper use; composition of sub- 
jects to be photographed; negative developing and paper printing; mixing 
of solutions; enlarging; lantern slide making; copying; flash lights; na- 
tural history and animal photography; photographic work under all condi- 
tions i»f light and weather; and microphotography. 

The course will be given with the special purpose of helping those in- 
terested in agricultural subjects. Includes laboratory and dark room work 
in producing the finished product. 

Student to furnish own camera of glass plate focusing type; all trays, 
chemicals and other necessary articles for work will be furnished with locker. 

Four hours laboratory or field work every other afternoon or morning. as 
arranged, including one hour lecture each week for six weeks. Lab. 3, 4 
hrs. ; no credit; deposit $8.00. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE (For Women) 

Gymnasium work as offered in the fall semester of the college year will 
also be offered during the first six weeks of the Summer Session with per- 
haps a few modifications to meet the needs of teachers. This work in folk 
dancing, games, Swedish, and light apparatus will be offered four hours a 
week for the six weeks. If one wishes two hours' additional work in tennis 
or basketball, full credit of Physical Training 1 as stated in the college 
catalog will be given. Lab. 1, 2 hr. ; fee $1.50. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING (For Men) 
5. Theory and Practice of Coaching. Theory of Play. Sportsmanship. 
Rules, Training, Physiology. Anatomy. Hygiene. Actual Competition. 
Actual Coaching. Lecture 1; lab. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 2y 3 . 

PHYSICS 

205. Mechancis Heat and Light. Fundamental principles of physics 
and their applications. Prerequisite Mathematics 17; recitations 3; credit 3. 

404. Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Sound. Prerequisite 303; 
recitations 4; lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 5; fee $2.00. 

Without lab., recitations 4; credit 4. 

POULTRY 

46. General Poultry Husbandry. Present status of the poultry in- 
dustry; various kinds of poultry products ordinarily produced for sale with 
special reference to their relative importance and their production as a 
branch of general agriculture and as a specialized industry; brief consider- 
ation of the more important classes and breeds of poultry and poultry man- 
agement dealing particularly with judging, housing, sanitation and mar- 
keting. Recitations 1%, lab. 1, 1% hrs.; credit 2; fee $2.00. 

47. General Poultry Husbandry. Continues the work of 46 and 
takes up, in a general way, feeding, incubation and brooding. Prere- 
quisite 46; recitations 1% ; lab. 1, 1% hrs.; credit 2; fee $2.00. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

6- Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence. The various mental 
features of child growth ; characteristics of childhood and the significant 
mental changes of the adolescent period, with special reference to the needs 
of teachers and parents; the individual, parental and social instincts; the 
adaptive instincts; imitation, curiosity, play. The educational value of 
play; the regulative instinct, moral and religious; the collecting and con- 



—30— 

structive instincts. The Montesori system and its application illustrated by 
simple apparatus. The psychology of adolescence; the boy scout movement, 
the girls' campfire, athletics. The psychology of cooking clubs and corn- 
judging contests. The instincts of childhood and adolescence and their 
place in the natural method of development. Eecitations 3; credit 3. 

7. Outlines of Psychology. An introduction to the study of the 
normal, adult, human mind. A foundation for all the other studies in 
psychology. Recitations 3; credit 3. 

8. Educational Psychology. A treatment of special phases of Gen- 
eral and Genetic Psychology which are most applicable to education. The 
processes of adaptation: instinct, impulse, habit, and will: the applied psy- 
chology of perception, imagination, memory, association, attention, interest, 
simple feelings, emotions, and the higher thought processes; special prob- 
lems: mental inheritance, individual differences, etc. Recitations 3; credit 3. 

12. Physical and Mental Tests. Designed particularly for those who 
expect to teach and for those most interested in the development of the 
child. Indicates the purpose of physical and mental tests; outlines their 
development; describes various forms of apparatus used, and the different 
methods of procedure; explains the treatment of the data secured; inter- 
prets the results and the conclusions thus far obtained. Recitations 2 ; 
credit 2. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

2. The Fundamentals of Public Speaking. To help the student get 
command of himself. Attention is especially given to voice building and 
expression. Recitation 1; credit 1. 

10. Extempore Speech. To develop the power of sincere and effective 
public speaking. The fundamental principles of speech organization and 
delivery studied according to the true extemporaneous method. The as- 
similation of the essentials of effective speaking and the working out of 
these essentials into actual practice before the audience. Each student is 
given the opportunity to appear in an original speech before his fellow 
students at least once every week or ten days. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

SOILS 

1.41. Soil Physics. The origin, formation and classification of soils. 
A study of moisture, temperature and aeration in soils, together with the 
conditions influencing changes in these factors. The proper preparation of 
seed beds by ordinary farm operations in relation to the securing of 
optimum physical soil conditions. A general study of all the physical 
properties of soils. Prerequisite Physics 205 or 303; recitations 2; labs. 2, 
2 In-.; credit 3^; deposit $4.00. 

342. Soil Fertility. Maintenance of fertility; the influence of com- 
mercial fertilizers, barnyard manure and green manure upon the quality and 
yield of various crops; the effect of different crops upon the fertility of the 
Boil and upon succeeding crops; different systems of rotation and the effect 
upon the productiveness of the soil of various methods of soil manage- 
ment. A fertility study of samples of soil from the home farm or any 
oilier soil. Prerequisites Ml ami Chemistry 352, except for Dairy, Chem- 
istry 352 only. For Horticulture, Soils 1 11 only; for Ag. Ed. and Ag. Eng., 
Soils 111 only; for 5-yr. Ag. Eng., Physics 303 only; recitations 2, labs. 
2, 2 Ins.; credit 3^ J deposit $8.00. 

L03. Special Problems in Soil Physics. Experimentation and study 
of special problems relating to tlie physical characteristics of soil and their 

relation to crop production. A wide r.-mvv of special subjects. Special ad- 
vantages for a study of the physical composition of soils. Prerequisites 
Il'1 or Ml; investigations hrs. per week; credit 13; deposit $4.00. 

304. Special Problems in Soil Fertility. Experimentation, special 
problems, relating to maintaining and increasing tin; productive capacity 



—31— 

ot' soils. Types of soil, systems of soil management, plant food and pro- 
ductive capacity of soils. A study of soil taken from the home farm, 
with a view toward determining the best systems of soil and crop manage- 
ment. A valuable stiuly for men who expect to farm under corn-belt con- 
ditions. Prerequisites 322 or 34:2; investigations 6 hrs. per week; credit 2; 
deposit $5.00. 

ZOOLOGY 

401. Farm Apiculture. The anatomy, physiology, development, and 
habits of the honey bee, including practice in general apiary methods; the 
handling of bees and their products; the races of bees, their diseases and 
enemies. 

The first two weeks 'will be devoted to general information for the be- 
ginner. The second two weeks will be of interest to the experienced bee 
keeper as well as the beginner and will deal with questions of swarming, 
artificial increase, queen rearing, mating, and introducing queens. The 
last two weeks of the session will deal with the diseases, wintering, and 
preparing the brood for market. It will be of interest to experienced bee 
keepers as well as beginners. Lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 2, deposit $3.00. 

MUSIC 

Members of the Summer School and others desiring musical instruction 
will be offered courses in Voice and Piano. The regular Summer Course 
in music will consist of three lessons a week, private lessons. These lessons 
are extra and not included in the regular college fee and must be arranged 
for with the director of the School of Music. The fees are payable in ad- 
vance at the Treasurer's Office. 

Any one desiring a lesser number of lessons than the regular Summer 
Course will pay a slightly higher rate than the followign prices: 

Three lessons a week in Voice, $18.00 for six weeks. 

Three lessons a week in Piano, $18.00 for six weeks. 

The practice pianos of the School of Music will be at the disposal of 
students at the following rates: One hour a day for the six weeks or less, 
$1.50; two hours a day, $2.50; three hours a day, $3.50. 

These are the regular rates charged in this department during the college 
year. For further details address, 

J. C. Harris 
Director, School of Music. 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS 



Where schedules can be changed to the advantage of some students with- 
out inconvenience to others, changes will be made on Monday evening, June 
12th. 

Recitations daily unless otherwise specified. 

Abbreviations: A. Ed. — Agricultural Education. A. E- — Agricultural Engineering. 
Ag. H. Agricultural Hall. A. H. — Animal Husbandry. Bac. — Bacteriology. Bot. — 
Botany. Cen. — Central Building. Chem. — Chemistry. C. B. — Chemistry Building. 
D. B. — Dairy Building. Econ. — Economics. En. An. — Engineering Annex. En. H. — 
Engineering Hall. Eng. — English. F. C. — Farm Crops. F. Mang. — Farm Manage- 
ment For. — Forestry. Geol. — Geology. H. E. — Home Economics. H. E. B. — Home 
Economics Building. Hist. — History. Hort. — Horticulture. Lab. — Laboratory. Lit. — 
Literature. L- P. — Lower Pavilion. M. H. — Margaret Hall. Math. — Mathematics. 
M. E- — Mechanical Engineering. O. A. — Old Agricultural Hall. P. C. — Physical Cul- 
ture. Photo. — Photography. P. S. — Pattern Shop. Phys. — Physics. Psych. — Psy- 
chology. Pub. Sp. — Public Speaking. R. — Room. Rec- — Recitation. U. P. — Upper 
Pavilion. Zool. — Zoology. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 

(First Half) 



Course 


Hour of Eecitation 


Eoom 


A. E. 5 


Bee. 8 Lab. 3-5 Tu. Th. Sat. 


204 O. A. 


A. E. 19 


Eec. 9 M. W. F. 


204 O. A. 


A. E. 21 


Eec. 10-12 Tu. Th. Sat. 


204 O. A. 


A. E. 36 


Eec. 10-12 M. W. F. 


204 O. A. 


A. Ed. 1 


Eec. 3 


210 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 3 


Eec. 2 


210 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 5 


Eec. 8 


208 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 7 


Eec. 1 


210 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 8 


Eec. 9 


208 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 10a 


Eec. 11 


208 Ag. H. 


A. II. 1 


Sec. 1 7-9, Sec. 2 3-5 


U. P. 


A. H. 2 


10-12 


U. P. 


A. H. 3 


Eec. 3, Lab. 7-9 


120 Ag. H., L. P. 


A. IT. 4 


Eec. 4, Lab. 10-12 


109 Ag. H., L. P. 


Bac. 1 


Eec. 10, Lab. 6-3 hr. 


307 Cen. 


Bac. 15 


Eec. 10, Lab. 3-2 hr. 


307 Cen. 


Bac. 18 


Eec. 7, Lab. 2 hrs. daily 8-12 


312 Cen. 


Bac. 30 


As arranged 


307 Cen. 


Hot. 60 


Eec. 10 M. W. F., Lab. 1-3 Tu. 






Th. Sat. 


312 Cen. 


Bot. 61 


Eec. 8 daily, Lab. 3-5 M. W. F. 


312 Cen. 


Bot. 70 


Eec. 11, Lab. 1-4 


312 Con. 


Chem. 107 


Eec. 9 daily 2 M. W. F., Lab. 






10-12 daily 


12 C. B. 


Chem. 108 


Roc s daily, 2 Tu. Th. S., Lab. 






10 12 daily 


15 C. B. 


Chem. 109 


Eec. 9 daily, 2 M. W. F., Lab. 






lo il' daily 


12 C. B. 


Chem. 1 lo 


Rec. 8 daily, 2 Tu. Th. S., Lab. 






10-12 daily 


15 C. B. 


Chem. •"■•"] 


Rec. 11 daily, 2 M. W. F., Lab. 






s in d;iilv 


286 C. B. 






SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS— Continued 



Chem. 352 

('hem. 375 



Chem. 376 
Chem. 403 
Dairy 10 

Dairy 12 

I. mil. 10 

Econ. 24 
Eng. 10 

Eng. 11 
Eng. 12 
Lit. 22 
Lit. 30 
F. C. 1 
F. C. 2 
F. C. 3 
F. C. 33 
F. Mang. 2 
Hist. 14 
Hist. 24 
H. E. 1- 4 
H. E. 43-44 
H. E. 45-46 
H. E. 48-49 
H. E. 50-51 
Hort. 3 
Hort. 408 
Hort. 104 
Math. 7a 
Math 8a 
Math. 17 
Math. 43 
Math. 45 
M. E. 121 
M. E. 140 
M. E. 181 
M. E. 219 
M. E. 220 
M. E. 245 
M. E. 331 
M. E. 401 
Photo. 1 
P. C. 1 
Phy. Tr. 5 
Phys. 205 
Phys. 404 
Psych. 6 
Psvch. 7 
Pub. Sp. 2 
Pub. Sp. 10 
Soils 141 
Soils 342 
Soils 14.", 
Soils 304 
Zool. 401 



| Eec. 10, Lab. 8-10 dailv 


286 C. B. 


| Eec. 7 daily, 2 M. W. F., Lab. 




8-10 daily 


15 C. B. 


j Eec. 11, Lab. 8-10 daily 


15 C. B. 


1 Eec. 9 daily, Lab. 7-9 daily 


15 C. B. 


] Eec. 8 


11 D. B. 


| Eec. 10 daily, Lab. 3-5, M. W. F. 


222 Cen. 


Eec. 10 daily, 9 M. W. F. 


222 Cen. 


Eec. 8 daily, 9 Tu. Th. S. 


222 Cen. 


Eec. 9 daily, 1 M. W. F. 


13 Cen. 


Eec. 10 daily, 1 Tu. Th. S. 


13 Cen. 


Eec. 2 


13 Cen. 


Eec. 4 


13 Cen. 


Eec. 3 


13 Cen. 


Eec. 9 daily, Lab. 1-3 M. W. F. 


307 Ag. H. 


Eec. 11 daily, Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. S. 


307 Ag. H. 


3-5 


307 Ag. H. 


Eec. 7 daily, Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. S. 


307 Ag. H. 


Eec. 10, Lab. 3-5, M. W. F. 


307 Ag. H. 


Eec. 9 


208 Cen. 


Eec. 8 


208 Cen. 


Eec. 7 M. W. F., Lab. 8-12 


110 H. E. 


Eec. 7 daily, Lab. 8-12 


202 H. E. 


7-12 daily, 1-3 daily 


200 H. E. 


Eec. 7, Lab. 8-12 daily 


208 H. E. 


Eec. 1, Lab. 8-10 and 2-4 daily 


206 H. E. 


Eec. 9, Lab. 1-3 


210 Ag. H. 


Eec. 10 


208 Ag. H. 


Eec. 7 


208 Ag. H. 


Eec. 8 


214 Cen. 


Eec. 8 


213 Cen. 


Eec. 9 daily, 1 M. W. F. 


215 Cen. 


Eec. 9 daily, 1 daily 


214 Cen. 


Eec. 9 daily, 2 daily 


213 Cen. 


1-5 


403 En. H. 


Eec. 7 Tu. Th. S., Lab. 8-12, 1-5 


P. S. 


1-5 


403 En. H. 


Eec. 10 M. W. F., Lab. 8-12 


403 En. H. 


Eec. 10 M. W. F., Lab. 8-12, 1-5 


403 En. H. 


Eec. 7 M. W. F., Lab. 8-12 


P. S. 


8-10, 1-5 


P. S. 


Eec. 8 


205 En. H. 


Lab. 1-5, M. W. F. 


387 C. C. 


4-6 Tu. F. 


M. H. Gym 


4-6 daily 


Men's Gym 


Eec. 9 daily, 4 M. W. F. 


209 En. H. 


Eec. 8, 3 


209 En. H. 


Eec. 10 daily, 4 Tu. Th. S. 


210 Cen. 


Eec. 8 daily, 4 M. W. F. 


210 Cen. 


Eec. 10 


311 Cen. 


Eec. 11 


311 Cen. 


Eec. 8, Lab. 10-12 


7 Ag. H. 


Eec. 9, Lab. 1-3 


7 Ag. H. 


As arranged 




As arranged 




Eec. 8 M. W. F., Lab. 9-12 M. W. F. 


288 C. B. 



-34— 



GENERAL AND RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSES 
(First Half) 



Course 



Hour of Recitation 



Room 



Agriculture S-3 




Sec. 1 and 5, 8-10 


306 O. A. H. 


Agriculture S-3 




Sec. 2 and 6, 10-12 


(Sec. 1, 2, 3, 4) 


Agriculture S-3 




Sec. 3 and 7, 1-3 


Old Hort. Lab. 


Agriculture S-3 




Sec. 4 and 8, 3-5 


(Sec. 5, 6, 7, 8) 


Agriculture S-4 




Sec. 1, 10-12; Sec. 2, 3-5 


120 Ag. H. 


Agriculture S-2 




As arranged 




Algebra 




Rec. 8 


214 Cen. 


Arithmetic 




Rec. 7, 11 


10 Cen. 


Civics 




Rec. 1 


208 Cen. 


Didactics I 




Sec. 1, 8; Sec. 2, 10 


109 Ag. H. 


Didactics II 




Rec. 3 


11 Cen. 


Didactics III 




Rec. 2 


11 Cen. 


Drawing 




Rec. 7 


206 H. E. 


Economics 




Rec. 11 


208 Cen. 


English (grammar) 


Rec, 11 


11 Cen. 


Geography 




Rec. 4 


10 Cen. 


History- 




Rec. 10 


7 Ag. H. 


Home Economics 


30 


1-3 


100 H. E. 


Home Economics 


31 


10-12 


100 H. E. 


Home Economics 


35 


3-5 


200 H. E. 


Home Economics 


36 


1-3 


210 H. E. 


Home Economics 


32 


8-10, 10-12 


101 H. E. 


Home Economics 


37 


Sees. 1 and 2, 1-3; Sec. 3, 3-5 








Sections 1 and 2 


202 H. E. 






Section 3 


208 H. E. 


Home Economics 


38 


8-10, 10-12, 1-3, 3-5 








Sections 1, 2, 3, 4 


14 H. E. 






Sections 5, 6, 7, 8 


10 H. E. 


Home Economics 


40 


10-12 




Home Economics 


48 


3-5 


Ill H. E. 


Manual Training 


S-6 


8-10, 10-12, 1-3, 3-5 








Sections 1, 2,- 3, 8 


203 En. An. 






Sections 4, 5, 6, 7 


302 En. An. 


Manual Training 


S-14 


10-12 


205 En. An. 


Manual Training 


S-15 


3-5 


208 En. An. 


Music 




Rec. 2 


209 Cen. 


Orthography 




Rec. 9 


109 Ag. H. 


Penmanship I 




Rec. 11 


110 Ag. H. 


Penmanship II 




Rec. 1 


110 Ag. H. 


Physical Training 


8 M. Th.; 10 Tu. Fri. 


Margaret Hall 


Physics 




Rec, 7 


207 Eng. H. 


Physiology 




Rec, 9 


to oon. 


Reading 




Hov. 8 


11 Cen. 



MODEL SCHOOL PROGRAM 

Room 1, Central, Grades First and Third. 

Room ::, Central, Grades Fifth and Eighth. 

Note: Work in the model school begins at 8 o'clock and continues until 11:30. In 
the lower grades emphasis will lie placed upon reading, language, numbers, l>usv work. 
History, geography and nature work will be secondary and more or less related to the 
languagi and tory work. 

The work in ili< upper grades will place greater emphasis unon English, arithmetic, 
physiology and history and will also demonstrate the possibilities of work in home 
economh and agriculture. The rural school plan on home economics work will be 

demonstrated three days each week. The work in agriculture will he correlated with 
hool plot at the college and the home project work being carried by the pupils. 

-I'll' oi program it not here given because of the necessity of changing the 
on in order to properly accommodate the work for observation purposes. 



SCHEDULE FOR THE SECOND HALF 

Schedule for the second half of the Summer Session is indicated below. 
It is thought that this will not need to be modified. At any rate, modifica- 
tions will be made only when students can be better accommodated. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 

(Second Half) 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


A. Ed. 2 


Rec. 8 dailv 


307 Ag. H. 


A. II. 20 


Rec. 11 daily 


109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 46-47 


Rec. 1 daily, 2 M. W. F., Lab. 2-5 






T. Th. S. 


110 Central 


Chem. 104-108-110 


Rec. 8 daily, 2 Tu. Th. S., Lab. 10- 






12 daily 


15 C. B. 


Econ. 4 


Rec. 8 


202 Cen. 


Econ. 10 


Rec. 9 daily, Lab. 1-3 M. W. F. 


202 Cen. 


Eng. 10 


Rec. 10 daily, 3 M. W. F. 


13 Cen. 


F. C. 1 


Rec. 9 daily, Lab. 1-3 M. W. F. 


307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 2 


Rec. 10 daily, Lab. 3-5 Tu. Th. S. 


307 Ag. H. 


Hort. 33 


Rec. 7 


208 Ag. H. 


Hort. 38 


Rec. 8 M. W. F., Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. S. 


208 Ag. H. 


M. E. 140 


8-10, 10-12, 1-3, 3-5 


Pattern Shop 


M. E. 121, 181 


8-10, 10-12, 1-3, 3-5 


403 En. H. 


Psych. 8 


Rec. 8 daily, 4 M. W. F. 


208 Cen. 


Psych. 12 


Rec. 11 daily, 4 Tu. Th. S. 


208 Cen. 



RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSES 
(Second Half) 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


Agriculture S-3 




Rec. 


and lab. 10-12 daily 


Old Hort. Lab. 


Agriculture S-4 




Sec. 


1, 8-10 daily 


12 D. B. 


Agriculture S-4 




Sec. 


2, 3-5 daily 


12 D. B. 


Didactics I 




Rec. 


4 


13 Cen. 


Didactics III 




Rec. 


3 


13 Cen. 


Home Economics 


S-32 


Rec. 


and lab. 1-3 daily 


101 H. E. 


Home Economics S-3 7 


Sec. 


1, 8-10 daily 


202 H. E. 


Home Economics S-37 


Sec. 


2, 10-12 


202 H. E. 


Home Economics S-38 


Rec. 


and lab. 8-10 


14 H. E. 


Manual Training 


S-7 


Sec. 


1, 10-12 


203 En. An. 


Manual Training 


S-7 


Sec. 


2, 3-5 


203 En. An. 


Manual Training 


S-16 


Rec. 


and lab. 1-3 


208 En. An. 



TENTATIVE SCHEDULE FOR OTHER CERTIFICATE SUBJECTS 



Algebra 


Rec. 7 


102 Cen. 


Arithmetic 


Rec. 9 


10 Cen. 


Civics 


Rec. 9 


208 Cen. 


Drawing 


Rec. 1 


206 H .E. 


Economics 


Rec. 10 


11 Cen. 


Geography 


Rec. 8 


10 Cen. 


Grammar 


Rec. 3 


10 Cen. 


History 


Rec. 7 


10 Cen. 


Orthography 


Rec. 4 


10 Cen. 


Penmanship 


Rec. 11 


110 Ag. H. 


Physics 


Rec. 2 


207 Eng. H. 


I'liysiology 


Rec. 11 


10 Cen. 


Reading 


Rec. 1 


10 Cen. 



SUGGESTIONS FOR PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

1. Bead carefully the description of the various courses and other mat- 
ter in this bulletin, and if the information is not sufficiently specific, do not 
hesitate to write for particulars. 

2. Fill out and mail the information blank on pages 37-38 which will give 
us an idea of your demands. This places you under no obligations, but it 
gives the Director of the Summer Session a better basis for making plans 
to handle the work on an efficient basis when you arrive. 

3. Upon your arrival at the depot in Ames, make yourself known to a 
member of the Reception Committee, who will be recognized by the college 
badge. If for any reason you miss the Committee, take the College Car to 
the College. Women should get off at Margaret Hall and go direct to the 
office in Margaret Hall for room assignment. Men will get off at the Cen- 
tral Station and go to the Y. M. C. A. headquarters in Alumni Hall for 
room assignment. 

If you come on the Interurban, get off at the Campus. 

4. After securing a room, observe the following plan of registration: 

(1) Go to the Registrar's office, fill out the two cards there fur- 
nished you, pay the Summer Session fee (or deposit certificates signed 
by your superintendent entitling you to free tuition in rural and grade 
teachers' course), and obtain a receipt. 

(2) Regular college students report to their respective deans for 
classification. 

(3) Others go to room 110, Agricultural Hall, for classification. 
Have in mind the work which you want as definitely as possible, but do 
not hesitate to ask questions and be fully advised before completing 
classification. 

(4) If any of your courses carry laboratory fees, fee cards may be 
secured from the instructors, and fees paid at the Treasurer's office. 

5. There are ample accommodations, and advanced notice is not neces- 
sary. The college has been accustomed to handling 3,000 students during 
the regular year, and knows how to <lo it right. However, if your plans 
are matured sufficiently early, it will assist in rapid assignment and regis- 
tration if advanced notice is given. 



—37— 



INFORMATION BLANK 

Prospective students are asked to use this blank in furnishing information 
and in making requests for further information. Cut out and mail to The 
Registrar, Ames, Iowa. 

Check below the courses in which you are interested. Check subject and 
underscore course number. Check other points also. Do not delay your 
inquiry. 

Courses totaling six semester hours, is our recommendation as to full time 
college credit work for each half. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 



.Agricultural Economics 10 
.Agricultural Education 1, 2, 3, 

5, 7, 8, 10a 
.Agricultural Engineering 5, 19, 

21, 36 

.Animal Husbandry 1, 2, 3, 4, 20 
.Bacteriology 1, 15, 18, 30 
.Botany 60, 61, 70 
.Chemistry 107, 108, 109, 110, 

173, 351, 352, 375, 376, 403 
.Dairying 10, 12 
. Economic Science 4 
.English 10, 11, 12 
.Farm Crops 1, 2, 3, 33 
.Farm Management 2 
.Forestry 36, 56, 57, 58 
.History 14, 24 



.Home Economics 1, 4, 43, 44, 

45, 46, 48, 49, 50, 51 
.Horticulture 3, 38, 104, 333, 408 
.Literature 22, 30 
.Manual Training 121, 140, 181, 

220, 245 

.Mathematics 7a, 8a, 17, 43, 45 
.Mechanical Engineering 401 
.Physical Training 1 
.Physics 205, 404 
.Photography 1 
.Poultry 46, 47 
.Psychology 6, 7, 8, 12 
.Public Speaking 2, 10 
.Rural Sociology 24 
.Shop Work 130, 331 
.Soils 103, 141, 304, 342 
.Zoology 401 



I can attend only the first half, June 12-July 21 . . . 
I can attend only the second half, July 24-Aug. 31 

I can attend either half. 

I will attend for twelve weeks 



—38— 

GENERAL COURSES 

General Agriculture 

Domestic Science for rural and grade teachers 

Domestic Science for Homemakers 

Manual Training 

Education (Didactics) 1, 2, 3 

Reading, Arithmetic, History, Geography, English, Physiology, Or- 
thography, Penmanship, Music, Drawing, Physical Education 
Civics, Economics, Physics, Algebra 

Check below if you want the above work for either of the following 
reasons: to meet the requirements of the law relating to 

12 weeks normal training 

3 points on salary 

12 weeks work for grades in the new subjects (Agriculture, Do- 
mestic Science and Manual Training) 
Students wanting the work for any of the three reasons given above, are 
limited to four subjects, except that orthography, music, penmanship, or 
physical education may be taken as a fifth subject. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Are you a graduate of an accredited High School? 



Do you want copy of Rural Life Conference Circular? 

Do you want camping space (men and families only) 1 

Is this card to be taken as request for advanced registration or simply for 

information ? 

Shall we reserve room for you ? 

Name 

Add i ess ( city ) 

( 'ounty 

State 

The following will be interested in receiving information about the Sum- 
mer Session : 

Name Address 



mitgi 



wcmtx % 



(&xttb 



I believe in a permanent agriculture, a soil that 
snail grow richer rather than poorer from year to 
year. 

I believe in hundred bushel corn and m fifty 
bushel wheat, and I shall not he satisfied with any- 
thing less. 

I believe that the only good weed is a dead weed, 
and that a clean farm is as important as a clean con- 
science. 

I believe in the farm boy and in the farm girl, 
the farmer s best crops and the future s best hope. 

I believe in the farm woman, and will do all in 
my power to make her life easier and happier. 

I believe in a country school that prepares for a 
country life, and a country church that teaches its 
people to love deeply and live honorably. 

I believe in community spirit, a pride in home 
and neighbors, and I will do my part to make my own 
community the best in the state. 

I believe in better roads. I will use the road 
drag conscientiously whenever opportunity offers, 
and I will not "soldier when working out my road 
tax. 

I believe in the farmer, I believe in farm life, I 
believe in the inspiration of the open country. 

— gxtxnk 3L <iHamt 






I 



ummer.Oessior^ 



owa 



Cjoecju wiP 11 

otate Colleae 

J % 9FD 1 r IQItP 









1 ^.'3i'- 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

AND MECHANIC ARTS 



COURSES OFFERED IN 1917 



1. For High School Teacliers, Superintendents, and College 
Students'XYiQ following college credit courses: 

Agriculture — (36 regular courses) 

Agricultural Engineering 9 courses 

Animal Husbandry 5 

Dairying 2 

Farm Crops 3 

Farm Management 1 

Forestry 5 

Horticulture 5 

Poultry , 2 

Soils 4 

Agricultural Education 8 

Agricultural Journalism 4 

Bacteriology 4 

Botany 3 

Chemistry 12 

Economic Science 3 

English and Literature 6 

History 3 

Home Economics 15 

Mechanical Engineering 9 

Mathematics 4 

Physical ( Culture (For Women) 2 

Physical Training (For Men) 2 

Physics 2 

Psychology 3 

Public Speaking 3 

General courses in agriculture, manual training and home eco- 
nomics adapted for high school teachers. 

2. For Rural and Grade Teacliers. Instruction in the in- 
dustrial subjects, — agriculture, home economics, manual train- 
ing, — and didactics. Enough work is provided in these subjects 
to occupy the full time of the student. 

SPECIAL FOR 1917 — Vocational courses designed to help teachers 
who may be interested in preparing for work of a vocational type, as 
will be required by the passage of the Smith-Hughes Vocational Edu- 
cation Bill. C ee particularly: 

Agricultural Education — courses 7, 31. 

Mechanical Engineering — course 141. 

Agricultural Engineering — courses, 1, 39, 40. 

Home Economics — courses 90, 91, 92. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

AND MECHANIC ARTS 

Vol. XV FEBRUARY 20, 1917 No. 28 

Seventh Annual 

Summer Session 

General Announcement 



1917 



Ames, Iowa 



Published Tri-monthly by the Iowa State College of Agriculture 
and Mechanic Arts. Entered as second-class matter, at the Post 
Office at Ames, Iowa, October 26, 1905, under the Act of Con- 
gress of July 16, 1904. 



1917 SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR 

Up to June 9 — Advanced Registration. 

June 9, Saturday — Registration, 8:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m. 

June 11, Monday — 8:00 a. m., Registration. 1:00 p. m., Work begins 
on regular schedule. 

June 12, Tuesday, 5:10 p. m. — General Summer Session Convocation, 
Agricultural Hall. 

June 16, Saturday — Regular work in a. m. (To make up work missed 
Monday a. m., June 11.) 

June 19, Tuesday, 8:00 a. m. — Beginning of study work for rural min- 
isters and leaders. Continue two weeks. 

June 27, Wednesday — 9:00 a. m. Opening of Rural Life Conference. 
Closes, Friday, June 29, 4:00. 

June 27, 28, 29, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday — Examination for 
county uniform certificates. 

July 4, Wednesday — National Holiday. 

July 20, Friday — 4:00 p. m., Close of first half of Summer Session. 



July 23, Monday — 8:00 a. m., Beginning of second half of Summer Ses- 
sion. Regular work each Saturday during second half. 

July 25, 26, 27, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday — Examination for 
county uniform certificates. 

August 30, Thursday — 12:00 m., Close of Summer Session. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




Summer Session work was of- 
fered by the Iowa State College 
for the first time in 1911. In 
that summer a short course ex- 
tending over two weeks was 
attended by about fifty su- 
perintendents and high 
school teachers of the state. 
Since that time the interest 
in agriculture and industrial 
subjects has increased tre- 
mendously, not only in this 
state, but throughout the 
United States. At the pres- 
ent time 22 states require 
the teaching of agriculture 
in the public schools, and in 
many more of the states agriculture is taught, especially in the 
high schools. In 1912 the Summer Session was extended to six 
weeks, and had a total enrollment of 128 students. The third Summer 
Session, 1913, enrolled 225 students. These students came from 63 
counties of the state and 10 states of the Union. 

The Summer Session in 1914 had a total attendance of 618. The 
students represented 96 counties in the state, 15 states and 6 foreign 
countries. Eighty-eight per cent of them were teachers in the public 
schools and not in attendance during the regular college year. 

During the last two summers, the enrollment has continued to in- 
crease and this hearty response on the. part of teachers shows clearly 
the wisdom of the legislature in passing the law requiring the teaching 
of the industrial subjects in the public schools. Properly organized and 
in the hands of qualified teachers, agriculture, home economics and 
manual training adapt themselves admirably as public school subjects. 
The subject matter is interesting, worth while, and has a useful out- 
come. 

General Statement. The college always has recognized its special 
responsibility in the training of high school and college teachers of 
agriculture, manual training, home economics, and the application of 
science to these vocational subjects. 

Teachers in service can be helped best through the Summer Session, 
and in a large measure they have a right to the advantages of the 
unusual equipment of the Iowa State College. This is especially true 
since the legislation requiring the teaching of the industrial subjects in 
the public schools. 

In the forthcoming Summer Session the excellent facilities of the 
college, as usual, will be available to the fullest extent to those who 
wish to enroll as students. 

Who May Properly Attend. On account of the easy conditions of 
entrance, many receive benefit from the Summer Session who do not 
attend during the regular year. The following should be particularly 
interested in the Summer Session; 



1. ALL TEACHERS, or persons expecting to teach next year, may 
use the Summer Session to secure work in the industrial subjects as 
required by the recent legislation. Teachers in the elementary schools 
will find profitable work in the Rural and Grade Teachers' Course. High 
school teachers may secure strong work along particular lines as listed 
under college credit courses. 

2. SUPERINTENDENTS, PRINCIPALS AND SUPERVISORS. The 
large number of superintendents and principals who have been enrolled 
in the Summer Session in the past indicates clearly that it is serving 
them to good advantage, and meeting a special need whicn they feel for 
getting acquainted with the newer subjects of manual training and ag- 
riculture, together with courses in agricultural education. An exam- 
ination of the Iowa Directory indicates that agriculture is taught in the 
high schools of the state by the superintendents more ofte:i ilian by any 
other single group. Beginning and advanced courses are offered in the 
present session in soils, farm crops, animal husbandry, dairying, agri- 
cultural engineering, horticulture, and in the related subjects of rural 
sociology, agricultural economics, agricultural education, botany, bac- 
teriology, etc. The Summer Session gives such superintendents and 
principals an opportunity to secure work of a high character under 
regular college instruction and under favorable conditions. 

3. COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS. Six weeks at the Iowa State 
College would be unusually helpful in view of the rapid development 
of the new subjects in the schools. 

4. HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES will find an opportunity to start 
the college course. High school graduates who think of entering the 
Iowa State College in the fall of 1917 may take advantage of the Sum- 
mer Session to become acquainted with college methods and to secure 
work towards graduation. Increasing numbers are taking advantage 
of the Summer Session for this purpose. 

5. REGULAR STUDENTS IN THE IOWA STATE COLLEGE may 
make up back work, shorten their course by doing advanced work, or 
increase their electives. 

6. STUDENTS in other colleges who are interested in the industrial 
work and related lines will find other colleges willing to substitute 
credits made at this institution. 

7. FORMER GRADUATES may complete the necessary work in 
psychology and agricultural education in order to secure the first grade 
st fit o f ort i fiffl t p 

8. ANY MATURE INDIVIDUAL who gives evidence of ability to 
carry the work with profit will be admitted without examination, but 
such individual must satisfy the department concerned as to his or her 
ability to carry the work. 

9. RURAL AND VILLAGE MINISTERS will find especially valuable 
help in the Rural Life Conference. Bankers, farmers, rural leaders, 
mothers and daughters will find a welcome, an atmosphere of culture 
and Inspiration, and practical help for their work. 

10. WOMKN of maturity will find particular help in the home- 
makers' courses offered during the Summer Session. These courses 
have proved popular and have attracted women not only from all parts 
of Iowa, but from other states. 

Conditions of Admission. All students who can profit by the instruc- 
tion offered will be admitted without examination, admission to a par- 
ticular course being satisfactory to the professor in charge. It is pre- 
sumed thai ;ill applying for admission have a serious purpose, and are 
Interei ted in the industrial work. College credit will be granted, how- 
ever, only to those who meet standard entrance requirements. 



-5- 



Studies and Credits. Nearly one hundred college credit studies are 
offered. Thirty-six of these are in agriculture. An average student 
should be able to make six hours credit during a single half of the Sum- 
mer Session. All courses offered are completed during a single half of 
the Summer Session by increasing the number of recitations per week. 
There are no split courses. A student desiring to carry more than six 
(or six and a fraction) hours of college credit work will be required to 
make application for permission to take extra work, application being 
countersigned by the instructors involved. The committee on extra 
work will meet Saturday evening, June 9. 

Late Entrance. Because of the rapidity with which the work moves 
in a short session, students should enter in time to attend the first ses- 
sion of all classes. Work begins at 1:00 P. M. on Monday, June 11. 
Courses in the new industrial subjects have laboratory periods, and 
student should therefore plan to be present for the first meeting of the 
class. 

General Courses. In the general courses, students will be given more 
freedom as to the number of hours to be carried. The schedule, how- 
ever, should be reasonable. Experience proves that a schedule that is 
too heavy is unsatisfactory both to the student and to the instructors. 

Special Work. Students wishing to do advanced or other special 
work not announced in this bulletin should communicate at an early 
date with the Director of the Summer Session, or with the professor 
in whose department they wish to work. Consideration may be given 
to a sufficient number of requests. 

Meeting Residence Requirements for a Degree Through Cummer 
Session Work. Because of the largely increased attendance at the 
Summer Session, provision has been made for the satisfying of resi- 
dence requirements for a degree on the basis of four Summer Sessions 
of six weeks each. The amount of work required for the degree will 
need to be supplemented by work in absence, or by correspondence. 

The Summer Session offers opportunity for graduate work in agricul- 
ture and related sciences. The number of graduate students in the 
Summer Session is increasing each year. Resident requirements for 
the master's degree may be met by attending the Summer Session for 




Birdseye View of Central Portion of Campus. 



-6- 

six weeks during three consecutive summers and carrying work in ab- 
sentia. For a detailed statement as to graduate work, address R. A. 
Pearson, Acting Dean of the Graduate Division. 

Fees. The single Summer Session fee of $5.00 for each half of six 
weeks, covers work in all courses with the exception of the Music De- 
partment. The fee for less than the full time is $1.00 a week, with $2.00 
as a minimum; or $1.00 per credit hour for college credit work, with 
$2.00 as a minimum. Laboratory fees are indicated in connection with 
the descriptions of the courses. In the Rural and Grade Teachers' 
Course, there are no incidental fees. No fee is charged for attendance 
at the Rural Life Conference. 

Room and Board. Room and board is available in private homes and 
at the college dormitories at prices which are customary throughout 
Iowa. The cafe in Alumni Hall will be open during the entire Summer 
Session, and will be managed on the cafeteria plan. 

Women will arrange for rooms through the regular college committee 
of which Mrs. Emily Cunningham is chairman. The college dormitories 
will be open for women students for board and room. A uniform rate 
of $5.25 a week will be charged for board and room in the dormitories 
where two occupy the same room. After the dormitories are filled, 
Mrs. Cunningham will assign women to selected houses about the 
campus, where the regular college rules will apply. In the dormitories 
and private homes alike, mattresses only are furnished for the cots, so 
that students should bring a pillow, sheets, pillow cases and an extra 
blanket. 

Women rooming in private homes may secure, board at the college 
dormitory dining rooms at the regular rate. 

Rooms for men will be available in private homes and rooming 
houses about the campus. Rooming arrangements for men will be in 
charge of Fred M. Hansen, Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

Expenses* Expenses will vary with the individual. For six weeks the 
expenses need not exceed $40 or $45, in addition to car fare. This makes 
provision for tuition, $5.00; room and board for six weeks, $31.50; 
books and laundry, $5.00, and other incidentals. 

Certificates. Students satisfactorily completing any of the general 
courses offered in the Summer Session will, upon request, be given a 
certificate showing attendance and grades. 

The State Board of Educational Examiners will grant five-year, first- 
grade certificates to graduates of the Iowa State College or other ap- 
proved colleges who have completed (a) six semester-hours of psychol- 
ogy, and (b) fourteen hours of education. The courses offered in the 
Summer Session enable students to meet these requirements. 

Teachers' Examination. The State Teachers' examination for June 
and July will be hold at the college during the Summer Session for the 
convenience of teachers in attendance. One expecting to take an ex- 
amination at the college should bring with him a statement from the 
county superintendent, together with county superintendent's receipt 
showing payment of fee, which will admit to the examination. Where 
such fee has not been previously paid it will be collected and forwarded 
to the county superintendent. 

The Appointment Committee. In order to better serve the schools of 
the state, the faculty has provided a regular Appointment Committee, 
the duties of which are to assist the students of the College who desire 
to enter educational work in finding positions for which they are best 
fitted, and to aid school officials in finding the teachers, principals, su- 
pervisors and superintendents besl prepared for the positions to be 
filled. Students of the Summer Session who intend to teach or wish to 
better their positions, are invited to register with this committee. 



7— 





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Model Summer Practice School. 

Blanks which are provided for that purpose may be secured by calling 
at the office of the Director of the Summer Session, Room 318, Agricul- 
tural Hall. No fee is charged for the services of this committee. 

Chapel. Chapel services are held Tuesday of each week from 7:40 to 
8:00 o'clock A. M. This is more or less in the nature of a convocation, 
as well as a chapel service, and furnishes opportunity for announce- 
ments or for brief remarks upon subjects of immediate interest. 

Each Sunday evening, vesper services are held from 6:15 to 6:45 at 
the campanile when the weather is favorable. In case of inclement 
weather, the meeting is held in Agricultural Assembly. 

Students' Mail. Students will avoid inconvenience by having their 
mail addressed, temporarily at least, to Station A, Ames, Iowa. This 
postoffice is located upon the College campus, and mail may be called 
for conveniently. 

Summer Employment. Students coming for the short Summer Ses- 
sion are not advised to seek employment, but to give their full time to 
school work. This is particularly urged in the case of teachers desiring 
to have the grades in agriculture, home economics and manual training 
transferred direct to the certificate. 

There are usually some summer calls for help. Students may learn 
of these calls through Mr. Fred M. Hansen, Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

Recreation. While the primary object of the Summer Session is 
work and study, yet these will be facilitated by a sufficient amount of 
recreation. Students are urged to effect organizations and to arrange 
for tournaments in tennis, baseball, track, or indoor work. The Com- 
mittee on Games and Recreation will encourage and help in organizing 
the details of this work. Play hour, 7 to 9 Friday evenings; educa- 
tional moving pictures, 8:00 o'clock Saturday evenings. 

Tenting Privilege. The privilege of tenting in the north woods will 
be continued this summer. There is no charge for tenting space, but at 
present the space is limited. It will be well to arrange in advance for 



-8- 

the privilege. Tents may be brought along or rented of tenting com 
panies. One company in Des Moines makes a price of $5 for six weeks 
for a 10 foot by 12 foot tent. 

I pecial Features. One feature of the Summer Session which is par- 
ticularly worth while is the opportunity to hear educators of national 
reputation. Last year's policy of selecting a limited number of men 
whose addresses no one can afford to miss will be continued this year. 
These lectures for the most part are scheduled for the evening; occa- 
sionally, however, at 5:00 o'clock. The following can be announced at 
the present time: 

Dr. F. W. Gunsaulus, President, Armour Institute of Technology, 
Chicago. 

Dr. C. A. Prosser, President, Dunwoody Institute, Minneapolis. 

Dr. F. J. Kelly, Dean, School of Education, University of Kansas. 

Dr. Charles H. Judd, Dean, School of Education, University of 
Chicago. 

Shakespearean Festival. The Ben Greet Players will again be pres- 
ent during the Summer Session, giving matinee and evening perform- 
ances on the college campus. Details of the program will be announced 
later. This is an opportunity which Summer Session students greatly 
appreciate. 

The Model Cchool. The popular two-room, consolidated Model 
School will be continued in charge of competent critic teachers. Regu- 
lar work in observation and methods will be offered for students in the 
general courses, and the work of the model school will be used in the 
regular college courses in agricultural education. Courses offered in 
Agricultural Education will include Principles and Methods of Educa- 
tion, Rural Education, Secondary Education, and School Administra- 
tion. This will enable us to serve directly the rural teacher, the 
grade teacher, the agricultural high school teacher, and the school ad- 
ministrator. The Model School provides the laboratory opportunity 
of demonstrating the best in educational methods. 

Boys' and Girls' Club Work. The growing interest in boys' and girls' 
club work and its rapid development throughout the state has led to an 
arrangement by which Professor Bishop and his assistants will give 
special lectures and demonstrations during the Summer Session. The 
work given will enable students to get a sufficient understanding to or- 
ganize and carry forward club work in their respective communities. 

Library. The library of the Iowa State College is well selected and 
it is so managed as to make it serviceable to all students during the 
Summer Session. 

Equipment. The equipment of the Iowa State College for work in 
agriculture, home economics, manual training and related subjects is in 
keeping with the wealth and resources of the State. In many respects, 
the Summer Session is the best season of the year for studying agricul- 
ture, and the regular college instructors in charge of the work use free- 
ly the resources of the college and the experiment station. 

Location. Ames is almost at the geographical center of the state of 
Iowa, on the main line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad. It is 
about thirty-five miles north of Des Moines, with which it is connected 
by a. branch line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad and by the 
Fori Dodge, Des .Moines and Southern (interurban) running from Fort 
Dodge and Rockwell City to Des Moines. A branch of the Chicago & 
Northwestern from Ames penetrates the northern part of the state. 
Ames i: proverbially a clean town, saloons and billiard halls being un- 
heard Of. 

Students should plan to arrive on Saturday or Monday. In case it is 
absolutely necessary to arrive on Sunday, advanced notice should be 



. 



given, with the request that rooms be arranged for, at least temporari- 
ly. In case of arrival on Sunday, without advanced notice, phone 652, 
the residence phone of the Director of the Summer Session. 

Rural Life Conference. The Rural Life Conference will open on 
Tuesday, June 19th, and close Friday evening, June 29th. The last three 
days will be in the form of a convention and will be of special interest 
to rural ministers and to residents and teachers of rural communities. 

In the past, this conference has been most helpful to Iowa and neigh- 
boring states in stimulating and developing rural leadership. Speakers 
of note from state and nation will appear before the conference. The 
public speaking department presented a rural life play last year thai 
was particularly appreciated. A special rural life play for Iowa is in 
course of preparation by the public speaking department and will bo 
presented during the Rural Life Conference. 

The lectures in the Rural Life Conference are free to Summer Ses- 
sion students, as well as members of the Conference. For special bul- 
letin giving detailed program of the Conference, write Dean Chas. F. 
Curtiss, Chairman of the Rural Life Conference Committee, or the 
Director of the Summer Session. 

LEGAL PROVISIONS OF INTEREST TO TEACHERS 

A large part of the work offered in the Summer Session is arranged 
in direct response to recent legislation. Work is therefore arranged to 
meet legal requirements. The laws of the state encouraging work in 
agriculture, home economics and manual training are in common with 
similar laws throughout the entire United States. The movement for 
the industrial work in the schools is not local nor is it transitory. It is 
gathering force each year. It is simply the recognition of the fact that 
education to be effective must be connected up directly with the work 
and dominant interests of the people. The government census shows 
that 68% of the people of Iowa are rural and that 49.2% are actually 




Husbandi 



Judging B< 



10- 



living upon farms. This makes agriculture the one dominant occupa- 
tion of the state. For women, of course, home economics is the one 
great interest, but women living on the farm are almost equally inter- 
ested in farm operations. While Iowa is not a large manufacturing 
state at present, the output of its factories is increasing steadily each 
year. Industry in one form or another takes most of the time of every 
one and there is no reason why our education should not connect up 
more and more with industry which shall put joy and satisfaction as 
well as scientific insight into all industrial and manual occupations. 

Any county superintendent can instruct teachers as to the legal re- 
quirements or the requirements of the State Educational Board of Ex- 
aminers with reference to the new subjects. Rural teachers taking 
work in agriculture, home economics or manual training may have the 
grades in these subjects transferred direct to the certificate on com- 
pletion of twelve weeks of work. Agriculture, home economics and 
manual training are the subjects in which the Iowa State College of 
all institutions is prepared to help teachers. 





' • f '* ™*!fr jyjgjy. 







Agricultural Hall. 



, 



OFFICERS AND FACULTY 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

D. D. Murphy, President, Elkader. 
W. C. Stuckslager, Lisbon. 

Geo .T. Baker, Davenport. 

Paul E. Stillman, Jefferson. 

Frank F. Jones, Villisca. 

P. K. Holbrook, Onawa. 

Chas. R. Brenton, Dallas Center. 

Edw. P. Schoentgen, Council Bluffs. 

H. M. Eicher, Washington. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

W. R. Boyd, Chairman, Cedar Rapids. 

Thomas Lambert, Sabula. 

W. H. Gemmill, Secretary, Des Moines. 

AUDITOR AND INSPECTOR 

Jackson W. Bowdish, Auditor and Accountant, Des Moines. 
John E. Foster, Inspector, Des Moines. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

Raymond A. Pearson, President, Central Building. 

E. W. Stanton, Vice-President, Central Building. 

G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session, Agricultural Hall. 
Herman Knapp, Treasurer and Registrar, Central Building. 

SUMMER SESSION COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, President. 

C. F. Curtiss, Dean of Agriculture. 

A. Marston, Dean of Engineering. 

R. E. Buchanan, Dean of Industrial Science. 

Catherine J. MacKay, Dean of Home Economics. 

G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session. 

PROFESSORS 

Robert Earle Buchanan Bacteriology 

Orange Howard Cessna Psychology 

J. C. Cunningham General Agriculture 

Gilmour Beyers MacDonald Forestry 

Martin Mortensen Dairy 

H. B. Munger Farm Management 

A. B. Noble English 

Louis Hermann Pammel Botany 

Maria M. Roberts Mathematics 

Fredrica V. Shattuck Public Speaking 

William Henry Stevenson Soils 

M. G. Thornburg Animal Husbandry 

G. M. Wilson Agricultural Education 



-12- 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 



Iva Brandt 
F. H. Culley 
H. L. Eichling 
Myrtle Ferguson 

E. F. Ferrin 
Genevieve Fisher 
C. C. Fowler 

F. M. Harrington 
Jaffrey Carl Harris 
William Ray Heckler 
Clyde McKee 

John Nathan Martin 
C. W. Mayser 
E. M. Mervine 

G. C. Morbeck 
J. O. Rankin 
R. R. Renshaw 
A. W. Rudnick 

Louis Bernard Schmidt 

P. S. Shearer 

R. E. Smith 

Harold Stiles 

L. A. Test 

H. W. Vaughan 

George H. Von Tungeln 

T. F. Vance 

John Anderson Wilkinson 



Home Economics 

Horticulture 

General Agriculture 

Home Economics 

Animal Husbandry 

Agricultural Education 

Chemistry 

Horticulture 

Music 

Farm Crops 

Farm Crops 

Botany 

Physical Training 

Agriculutral Engineering 

Forestry 

Economic Science 

Chemistry 

Dairy 

History 

Animal Husbandry 

Soils 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Animal Husbandry 

Economic Science 

Psychology 

Chemistry 



J. H. Buchanan 
Chas. H. Dorchester 
E. E. Eastman 
H. H. Gibson 
L. S. Gillette 
A. J. Hauser 
John Hug 
W. A. Merriam 
H. R. O'Brien 
H. J. Plagge 
Raymond Rogers 
T. R. Truax 
H. H. Walter 
Polly Witwer 

R. E. Burling 
D. c. Carter 

.Janet 0. Cation 
Marion A. Danielle 
Edward W. Dolch, Jr. 
Ruth Edgerton 
A. F. Kd minster 
Henry Giese 
Helene Hanson 
Boy J. Holm os 
Blanche [ngersoll 
('-. iv Linden 
Cora I'.. Miller 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 
Chemistry 
Farm Crops 
Soils 

Agricultural Education 
Animal Husbandry 
Dairy 

Mechanical Engineering 
Physical Training 
Agricultural Journalism 
Physics 

Physical Training 
Forestry 

Physical Training 
Home Economics 
INSTRUCTORS 

Bacteriology 

Agricultural Engineering 

Home Economics 

Mathematics 

English 

Physical Culture 

Horticulture 

Manual Training 

Homo, Economics 

lOnglish 

Homo Economics 

Physical Training 

Homo Economics 



. 



13- 



J. R. Sage Mathematics 

E. M. Spangler Mechanical Engineering 

O. C. Ufford Poultry 

Roy O. Westley Farm Crops 

Zelma Zentmire Chemistry 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



LIBRARY 



Jaffrey C. Harris 
Mrs. J. C. Harris 

Amy W. Noll 
Winnifred Raymond 

LABORATORY ASSISTANTS 
Anson Hayes Chemistry 

D. L. Scoles Chemistry 

SPECIAL INSTRUCTORS 
Fred D. Barber General Science 

Professor of Science, Illinois State Normal University. 
W. H. Bender Agricultural Education 

Professor of Agricultural Education, College of Agriculture, Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. 
Anna L. Burdick Vocational Education 

Director Vocational Guidance, Des Moines City Schools. 
W. A. Foster Industrial Arts 

Professor of Vocational and Manual Training, State Normal School, 

West Chester, Pennsylvania. 
Johanna M. Hansen Domestic Art 

Supervisor of Art Instruction, Sioux City Public Schools. 
Kramer J. Hoke Agricultural Education 

Superintendent of Schools, Duluth, Minnesota. 
A. P. Laughlin Manual Training 

Supervisor of Manual Training, Des Plaines, Illinois. 
Pearl McCaslin Critic Teacher 

Special Teacher of Arithmetic, Connersville, Ind. 
Cleo Murtland Home Economics 

Vocational Home Economics Specialist, Teachers College, Columbia 

University, New York City. 
F. P. Reed Manual Training 

Superintendent of Schools, Osceola, Iowa. 
Bertha C. Stiles Primary Critic Teacher 

Primary Supervisor, Hibbing, Minn. 
Anna Tjaden Manual Training 

Manual Training High School, Peoria, 111. 



GENERAL COURSES 

High School teachers are more and more interested in securing regu- 
lar college credit work in agriculture, so that the general course for 
high school teachers is no longer continued. Superintendents and high 
school teachers can secure a combination of work in different depart- 
ments which will enable them to secure a general view of the subject 
in a single summer if necessary. However, for rural and grade teach- 
ers, and for farmers, business men and homemakers, general courses 
are continued. 

S-2. Agriculture. Each summer there have been a few farmers and 
business men and women desiring to get a general knowledge of the 
fundamentals of agriculture from the combined scientific and practical 
point of view. The demands of such individuals vary so much that it is 
necessary to take up each case and arrange a schedule accordingly. 
While one will desire to devote his full time to a study of farm animals, 
another will desire all of his time on the study of soils or plants or 
orcharding. It has been found possible to meet these remands quite 
fully and to give a combination of work which will enable each individ- 
ual to get economically the practical information which he desires. 
Since those asking for this particular course do not ask for college 
credit, they are given considerable freedom, the sole purpose being to 
meet their demand in a satisfactory way. It is suggested that individu- 
als knowing before hand that they will ask for this course write some- 
what in detail the work which they desire. This will give an oppor- 
tunity for consultation in arranging the course satisfactorily. 

The division of Home Economics will offer beginning and continua- 
tion courses of a very practical nature for homemakers of the state who 
may desire to take advantage of the summer work. This work has al- 
ways been very popular because of its intensely practical nature and 
this summer it has been decided to offer all courses co-ordinately, that 
is, without any prerequisite requirements. 

Women who desire to come for the first three weeks of the Summer 
School can secure available units of work in the homemakers' courses 
and have at the same time an opportunity of attending the Rural Life 
Conference. 

S-30. Dressmaking. Especially planned for women who wish to be- 
come more skillful in home sewing. It will include the alteration and 
use of commercial patterns, practice work in fitting, designing, and 
making patterns, use of the machine attachments, etc. In the work of 
garment making a choice will be given in the garment to be made, in- 
cluding underwear, blouses, tailored dresses, etc. 

S-31. Dressmaking. Use of the dress form in home sewing. Work 
consists of making a tight fitting lining, padding and fitting up a form. 
Garment making will consist of an afternoon dress or wool skirt and 
bloui I 

S 35. Cookery. This course is to be divided into two periods of 
three weeks each, so thai those who wish may take the full six weeks' 
v. oil: or cither of (lie three weeks' periods. The first period will in- 
clude tie- cooking Of meats and vegetables and the preparation of appe- 
tizing disli<:: from lefl over foods. The second period will include the 
rook in;/ of cereals, quick breads and beverages. 

s :;<;. Cookery. Discussion of different types of table service, includ- 
ing the preparation and serving of typical meals. Illustrating suitable 






15 - 



food combinations. Food adapted to the needs of the family under 
varied conditions will be considered, also the preparation, selection and 
serving of foods for the sick. 

RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSE 
Tuition Free 

(Students who are high school graduates may take college credit 
work upon payment of the fee.) 

This course is offered to enable rural and grade teachers to have the 
advantages of the unusual facilities of the Iowa State College in prepar- 
ation for teaching agriculture, home economics and manual training in 
the public schools in an intelligent and effective manner. The instruc- 
tion will emphasize the elementary side of the subjects, giving particu- 
lar attention to methods of preparing material, and of organizing the 
work in rural schools. The laboratories and teaching equipment of the 
college, including the library and the experiment farms, will be avail- 
able to the students, but the aim throughout will be to so handle the 
work as to illustrate the possibilities of doing the work effectively un- 
der rural school conditions. The primary object of the course is to give 
work in the industrial subjects to present and prospective teachers, and 
other work will be offered only when carried along with industrial 
work. 




School Gardening- Training- Class. 

The work is arranged to meet legal requirements. 

Admission to this course requires graduation from the common 
schools and the recommendation of the county superintendent of 
schools. 

This course makes provision for the following work: 

1. General Agriculture S-3. This course is planned after consulta- 
tion with the state department so as to meet the requirements of teach- 
ers who are preparing to teach agriculture in the rural and grade 
schools. The course will deal with the phases of agriculture that can 
be taught to the best advantage in the rural schools and will consist of 
class, laboratory and demonstration work. Topics included in this be- 
ginning course of six weeks are soils and soil fertility, culture and im- 
provement of crops, especially of corn, seed corn selection, storing, 
testing and judging, weeds and weed eradication, bacteria, fungi and 
insects, orchards and orcharding, gardening for home and school, the 
propagation of plants and related topics suitable for rural schools. 




Students Judging Corn in Farm Crops Laboratory. 

2. General Agriculture S-4. This is a continuation of the course de- 
scribed in the paragraph above. Topics dealt with are farm animals, 
including horses, cattle, sheep and swine, but with particular emphasis 
upon poultry. Poultry is considered by the state department and oth- 
ers as a topic particularly adapting itself for treatment in the rural and 
grade schools. The course will give the student a definite knowledge 
of the qualities to expect in good stock and will consider selection, im- 
provement, care and management. Attention will also be given to 
dairying, including the use of the Babcock test. 

3. Home Economics S-32... Sewing. This course includes the teach- 
ing of plain sewing upon articles which may be made in the one-room 
rural school. The emphasis will be upon plain sewing. Help will be 
given in the selection of materials, and the practical work of cutting, 
finishing and repairing garments. 

4. Home Economics S-37. Cooking. This course aims to teach the 
fundamental principles of foods and their preparation so that the rural 
school teacher will have a knowledge of the facts necessary for the 
teaching of cooking. Subjects treated include food preparation, food 
value to the body, and the planning and serving of economical meals. 
This work will be done in the regular college laboratories. 

5. Home Economics S-38. This is the general course for rural 
unci grade teachers. The work will be done under conditions and with 
equipment ihat can he easily duplicated in the rural schools. For part 
of the work a specially devised rural school home economics cabinet 
will be used. The emphasis will be placed upon the planning of a suit- 
able course of lessons, demonstration with the pupils of the model 
school as a class, lesson planning, co-operation with the home and nec- 
essary equipment. The purpose is to give the teacher a definite plan so 
thai She will willingly carry out the work in her school next winter. 



-17- 



6. General Manual Training S-6. The introductory course of six 
weeks in general manual training will deal with the rougher and more 
practical farm problems and includes such exercises as saw horse, 
bench hook, nail box, corn tray, bird house, hog trough, milking stool, 
bench vice, seed sample case, chicken brooder, etc. Because of the 
bulky nature of the models in the exercises undertaken in this course, 
materials will be furnished without a fee and at the close of the course 
students will be given an option to purchase the models at actual cost 
of material. 

7. General Manual Training S-7. This will be a continuation of gen- 
eral manual training S-6, but will deal more particularly with farm 
home problems. The exercises will require more refined work and a 
higher degree of finish and will include the necessary basis in drawings 
and reading of the same. The following are some of the exercises 
which will be undertaken: Book rack, plant stand, waste basket, medi- 
cine case, hall tree, porch swing, bulletin case, screen, small step lad- 
der, sleeve board, fly trap, etc. Students will pay for lumber actually 
used and the completed work will become the property of the student. 
Double period daily. 

8. Manual Training S-15. Basketry and Weaving. The work in this 
course carries a double purpose; first, to give ability in organizing 
such work for the lower grades in school, and, second, to give actual 
practice in performing processes that are useful in the school and that 
are personally useful to the individual. 

9. Manual Training S-16. Manual training for lower grades. Con- 
tinuation of S-15. 

Notes: Teachers will be interested in knowing of the ruling of the 
state educational board of examiners to the effect that grades in agri- 
culture, home economics, and manual training when carried success- 
fully for 12 weeks may be transferred direct to the certificate without 
further examination. 




>1 Children Doing Summer Gardening. 



18- 



Home economics students are requested to wear wash dresses in the 
cooking laboratories. White aprons, hand towels and holders will also 
he required. 

10. Didactics. The work in didactics for rural and grade teachers 
will be further developed during the coming Summer Session to meet 
the increasing demands of high grade teachers who have been continu- 
ing in the rural and grade teachers' course. Three courses will be of- 
fered as follows: 

Didactics I. — A general course of didactics having in mind the prepar- 
ation of the teacher for school work and for passing the examination. 
The course will deal with management, study, and the technique of the 
recitation. 

Didactics II. — Special methods in arithmetic, geography and history 
for the upper grades. Some attention to other subjects. 

The recently adopted reading circle book, Wilsons' Motivation of 
School Work, will be used as basic text for this course. 

Didactics III. — Primary methods with particular attention to primary 
reading, busy work, and the special problems of the primary teacher. 
This course will be handled again during the coming summer by Miss 
Bertha Stiles, who has made it such a valuable course for lower grade 
teachers. 

11. Other Work. Teachers of any grade who are enrolled in the 
Summer Session and are prepared to take college credit work may 
select subjects offered in the college credit list in so far as they are 
prepared to enter these classes. To secure college credit, the student 
must meet the usual preliminary requirements. It is customary here, 
as in other colleges and universities, to waive certain requisites in 
cases of mature students who obviously are prepared to take college 
grade work and for good reason have not complied with all of the for- 
mal requirements. 

The following list of college credit subjects will be of particular in- 
terest to rural and grade teachers. 

Algebra 40 8:00 a. m. 

History 24 8:00 a. m. 

Economics 110 10:00 a. m. 2:00 p. m. M. W. F. 

Physics 205 9:00 a. m. M. W. F. S. 4:00 p. m. M. W. F. 

Civics 34 11:00 a. m. 1:00 p. m. M. W. F. 

English 10 9:00 a. m. 4:00 p. m. M. W. F. 

Reading 3 7:00 a. m. 

Drawing 50-51 7:00 p.m. 8:00-12:00 

Last year 75% of the rural and grade teachers were qualified to 
take college credit work. Accordingly the time schedule of the classes 
for the above work has been arranged to permit this work to be taken 
in connection with their other studies. In addition to the above, work 
in Music and in Physical Culture, including swimming, is open for 
rural and grade teachers. See description of college courses. 
FEES IN GENERAL COURSES 

There will be no fees in connection with the work for rural and grade 
teachers. In the industrial subjects, students may take the finished 
p'roducl on payment of the actual cost of materials used. 

The fees or deposits in the homemakers' courses have been esti- 
mated aj follows: 

Home Economics 8-30 Fee, $1.00 

Home Economics s::i Fee, $1.00 

Home Iv-onomies S-35 Fee, $3.00 

Home Economics S-36 Fee, $3.00 



COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 

There are many who wish to take some of the regular college courses 
either because of the intrinsic value of the work to them in a practical 
way or as a part of a regular college course to be completed later. 

The courses described below are the same as those offered during the 
college year and will be taught by the regular college faculty. The de- 
scriptions are quoted from the regular college catalog. 

Other courses may be offered when requested by sufficient number 
of students. 

As the Summer Session is approximately one-third the length of a 
college semester, the number of hours per week devoted to a course in 
the Summer Session will be three times what is shown in the descrip- 
tions below. Six hours per week constitutes full work in these college 
courses. There is little doubt but that the numbers in each course will 
justify offering it. 

A resolution adopted by the Iowa Council of Education indicated 
about thirty-two hours of technical agriculture of a college grade as the 
minimum for a regular teacher of agriculture in the high school. This 
amount of work will easily be secured in successive Summer Sessions. 
The work in agriculture offered during the summer of 1917 includes 
additional courses to meet further demands for agriculture. The pros- 
pective student who is looking forward to several Summer Sessions in 
succession is advised to plan his work so as to cover the field in a rea- 
sonable manner and meet the minimum requirements as suggested by 
the Iowa Council of Education. 

The regular amount of work for a single Summer Session will enable 
one to secure twelve hours of agriculture and this will meet require- 
ments in some schools. For instance, during the first half, one could 
secure work as follows: A. H. 1, 2 hrs.; F. C. 1 or Hort. 3, 2% hrs.; 
Dairy 10 or Hort. 408, 2 hrs.; total 6% hrs. This is merely illustrative. 
Any other combination of animal husbandry, agricultural engineering, 
dairy, farm crops, farm management, poultry, horticulture, or soils, 
wouid be acceptable and all of this is the right type of agricultural work 
for the prospective high school teacher. The reasonably small units of 
specialized work are considered much more desirable than courses in 
general agriculture. The schedule is so arranged as to avoid conflict, 
and enable the student to carry the full amount of agriculture during 
the first and second halves of the summer school. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

1. Methods of Teaching. The technique of the recitation; types of 
lessons and the standards for judging them; the selection and organ- 
ization of subject matter; the bases for readjusting the curriculum to 
make room for new types of school work; efficiency in the manage- 
ment of the study period. 

Recitations 2; credit 2. 

2. Principles of Education. The biological, sociological and psy- 
chological bases of education; aims and values in the curriculum, with 
particular reference to industrial and vocational subjects. 

Recitations 2; credit 2. 

4. The Present Day High School. Problems, organization, manage- 
ment, and methods; criteria for the selection of subject matter. Reci- 
tations 2; credit 2. 



-20- 




Practical Work for Teacher and Pupils. 
Educational History. Methods and curricula. 



Recitation 2. 



credit 2. 

7. Vocational Education. Development and present best practice 
with reference to vocational education, pre-vocational education, and 
vocational guidance. 

Recitations 2; credit 2. Offered in the Summer Session. 

8. Rural Education. The study of rural education with particular 
reference to the interests of the county superintendent, the normal 
training teacher, and the superintendent or teacher in the consolidated 
or village school. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

9. School Administration and Supervision. School surveys, with 
emphasis on the industrial and vocational aspects. (Prospective stu- 
dents in this course are asked to write early to G. M. Wilson, Head of 
the Department, asking instructions as to bringing with them certain 
data relating to their own school systems.) 

Recitations 2; credit 2. 

21 A. Training in Teaching Home Economics. This course is a 
Summer Session adaptation of the regular course in special methods 
and practice teaching. It is planned for teachers of home economics in 
grades and high schools. It includes a study of the choice of suitable 
subject matter, method of presentation, equipment, illustrative material 
and a comparison of the more recent text books designed for grade and 
high school classes. Special emphasis will be placed upon the planning 
of work in home economics for vocational schools in which foods may 
be prepared in large quantities in connection with the school lunch 
room, or where courses in dressmaking and millinery lead directly to 
trade work. 

Recitation 2; credit 2. 

31. Training in Teaching Agriculture. Courses of study; lesson 
plans; observation and practice teaching under supervision. 

Recitation 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit ?,. 

31 A. Vocational Agriculture. A special adaptation of course 31 to 
help present teachers of agriculture who desire to place their work on 
a vocational basis. Recitation 2; credit 2. 



—21- 



31-B. Normal Training Agriculture. An adaptation of course 31 for 
teachers of agriculture in normal training high schools. The work will 
include recitations and laboratory work. Definite plan of usable ma- 
terial will be worked out in the laboratory, including adapted equip- 
ment which teachers going into the rural schools for the normal train- 
ing course can use directly. Recitation 1; laboratory, 2, 2 hrs.; credit 2. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

5. Farm Machinery and Farm Motors. Mechanics and materials; 
the measurement and transmission of power; development, construc- 
tion, functions and methods of operating, adjusting and repairing farm 
machinery and farm motors; the principles of draft and the production 
of power. Laboratory work is devoted to the study of construction, 
operation, adjustment and testing of machines discussed in the class 
room. 

Prerequisite Phys. 205; recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 2%; fee 
$2.00. 

13. Gas and Oil Engines. Practical operation and management of 
the internal combustion engine. The development, the existing types, 
the theory and practice of operation; the adjustment, the repair, and 
the utility of gas, gasoline, oil and alcohol engines. Laboratory work 
consists of tests and exercises to familiarize the student with the prac- 
tical care and management of this type of motor. 

Recitation 1; lab. 1, 3 hrs.; credit 2; fee $2.50. 

19. Rural Sanitary Equipment. A brief study of lighting, heating 
and ventilation systems for farm buildings; sanitary construction, 
plumbing, systems of water supply and sewage disposal. A. E. 36 may 
accompany this as a laboratory. Recitation 1; credit 1. 

21. Cement Construction. The use of cement in farm building con- 
struction. Cement testing study mixtures; construction of forms, rein- 
forcement. Also other building materials. 

Recitation and lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 1; fee $2.00. 

30. Farm structures. The class work of 6. Sketches rather than 
finished drawings. 

Prerequisite 4; recitation 1; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 1%. 




Class in Dairy Judging. 



-22- 

36. Rural Sanitary Equipment Laboratory. To accompany or fol- 
low A. E. 19. For agricultural students. 
Lab. 1, 2 hr. period; credit %; fee $1.50. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING: VOCATIONAL COURSES 

I. Farm Forge Work. Elementary principles; drawing, welding, 
tempering, annealing; the making of useful articles and simple tools 
and repairs. Laboratory 1, 3 hrs.; credit 1. 

39. Concrete. Projects in concrete and the making of concrete 
forms. Emphasis upon actual operations and the acquisition of skill. 
Leading to definite plan for use in high school. Laboratory 1, 3 hrs.; 
credit 1. 

40. Farm Repair Shop. An elementary course in repair and con- 
struction for the farm; rope splicing, soldering, harness mending, 
grinding, sharpening, and care of tools. Students in this course will 
make complete plans for the construction and equipment of the farm 
repair shop. Laboratory 1, 3 hrs.; credit 1. 

AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISM 

8. Beginning Technical Journalism. The fundamentals of journal- 
istic writing. Lectures on news, news values and news styles, with 
practice in news gathering and writing, and the application of the prin- 
ciples involved to technical and informational writing. 

Prerequisites English 18 and 19 or Eng. 23 and 24; recitations 2; 
credit 2. 

9. Agricultural Journalism Practice. Devoted primarily to practice 
writing, following up the work in 8. Readiness in writing and the de- 
veloping of originality and individuality are emphasized. Special at- 
tention is given to the longer agricultural and magazine articles. 

Prerequisite 8; recitations 2; credit 2. 

II. Beginning Home Economics Journalism. Similar to 8, except 
that it teaches writing for women's and other journals upon subjects in 
which women are especially interested. 

Prerequisites English 220 and 221; recitations 2; credit 2. 
12. Home Economics Journalism Practice. Similar to 9, but de- 
signed to meet the special requirements of women students. 
Prerequisite 11; recitation 2; credit 2. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

1. Types and Market Classes of Beef Cattle and Sheep. Judging; 
study of carcasses, live stock markets, and the market classification of 
livf* ^ t o r* "U* 

Recitation 1; lab. 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.50. 

2. Type and Market Classes of Dairy Cattle, Horses and Swine. 
Judging; study of carcasses, live stock markets, and market classifi- 
cation of live stock. 

Recitation 1; lab. 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.50. 

3. Breed Studies of Beef Cattle and Sheep. Judging types and rep- 
resentatives of different breeds according to their official standard; 
study of Hi*' origin, history, characteristics and adaptability of the 

breeds. 

Prerequisite 1; recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3y 3 ; fee $2.00. 

4. Breed Studies of Dairy Cattle, Horses and Swine. Judging types 
and representatives of different breeds according to their official stand- 
ards; study of the origin, history, characteristics and adaptability of 
the breeds. 

Prerequisite 2; recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3%; fee $2.00. 
20. Animal Feeding. Composition and digestibility of feeding stuffs; 
the preparation Of coarse fodders; the grinding, steaming and cooking 



-23- 

of feeding stuffs; feeding standards and calculation of rations; feeding 
for meat, milk, wool, growth and work. 

Prerequisites, Chem. 151, 351 or 408; recitations 2; credit 2. 

46. General Poultry Husbandry. Various kinds of poultry products 
ordinarily produced for sale, with reference to their relative import- 
ance and opportunities for their production; characteristics of import- 
ant classes and breeds of poultry; judging, breeding, housing and mar- 
keting. 

Recitations 1V 2 ; lab. 1, \y 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $2.00. 

47. General Poultry Husbandry. Continues the work in 46 and in- 
cludes feeding, incubation, brooding, diseases and sanitation. 

Prerequisite 46; recitations 1V 2 ; lab. 1, iy 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $2.00. 
BACTERIOLOGY 

1. General Bacteriology. Morphology, classification, physiology and 
cultivation of bacteria; relation of bacteria to health of man and 
animals, to infection, contagion, immunity, and to other scientific and 
agricultural problems. Laboratory work on methods of cultivating bac- 
teria and the study of bacterial functions and activities, bacterial con- 
tent of water and food, with interpretation of results reacned. 

Prerequisite, Organic Chemistry; recitations 2; lab. 3, 2 hr.; credit 4. 
fee $5.00. 

15. General Bacteriology, Animal Husbandry. A discussion of gen- 
eral bacteriology, followed by study of the relationship of bacteria to 
agriculture with particular reference to the live stock industry. 

Prerequisite, Organic Chemistry: recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 
2%; fee $4.00. 

18. Bacteriology and Fermentations. Bacteria in their relation to 
the home, including a brief consideration of the pathogenic forms and 
the bacteria, yeasts and molds in their zymotic activities. 

Prerequisite, Organic Chemistry; recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 
3%; fee $5.00. 

30. Research in General Systematic Bacteriology. For graduate 
students. Professor Buchanan. 

Prerequisites 1 and 5 or equivalent; fee $5.00. 

BOTANY 

161. Plant Morphology. First part: structures of the higher plants; 
purpose, to support the work in home economics and agriculture. Sec- 
ond part: different plant groups; purpose, to make clear plant evolu- 
tion, and to lay a basis for the study of bacteriology and plant path- 
ology. 

Recitation 1; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 1%; fee $2.00. 

470. Systematic Spermatophytes. Flowering plants; historical sur- 
vey of various systems of classification; study of groups by means of 
some representatives. 

Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $3.00. 

560. Botany of Weeds. Injury of weeds to farm, garden and horti- 
cultural crops; origin and distribution of weeds. 

Recitation 1; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 1%; fee $3.00. 

CHEMISTRY 

103. General Chemistry. Engineering students. Principles and a 
study of non-metallic elements. 

Lectures 2; recitation 1; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 4; deposit $6.00. 

104. General Chemistry and Qualitative Anaylsis. Engineering stu- 
dents. Continuation of 103. The metallic elements, their separation 
and identification. In the last half of the semester lectures will be 
given on special chemical subjects related to engineering problems. 

Lectures 2; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 4; deposit $7.50. 



-24— 

107. General Chemistry. Agricultural students. Principles and the 
non-metallic elements. 

Lectures 2; recitations 1; labs. 2, 2 hr. or 3 hr.; credit 4y 3 or 5; 
deposit $6.00. 

108. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. Agricultural stu- 
dents. Continuation of 107. The metallic elements, their separation 
and identification. 

Lectures 2; recitations 1; labs. 2, 2 hr. or 3 hr.; credit 4y 3 or 5; 
deposit $7.50. 

109. General Chemistry. Home Economics students. Principles and 
the non-metallic elements. 

Lectures 2; recitations 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 4y 3 ; deposit $6.00. 

110. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. Home Economics 
students. Continuation of 109. The metallic elements, their separation 
and identification. 

Lectures 1; recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3%; deposit $7.50. 

173. Summer Practice for Chemical Engineering Students. One hun- 
dred and seventy hours of summer practice in quantitative analysis. Re- 
quired of students specializing in chemical engineering and applied 
chemistry during the summer between second and third years. 

351. Applied Organic Chemistry. Physical and chemical properties 
and methods of preparation of important classes of organic compounds; 
the composition of plant and animal bodies; the proximate principles 
of foods and the chemical changes which occur during digestion. 

Prerequisite 108; lectures 3; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 3%; deposit $6.00. 

352. Agricultural Analysis. Principles of gravi-metric and volumet- 
ric analysis; the analysis of milk, grain, and mill feeds and fodders. 

Prerequisite 351; lectures and recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 
3y 3 ; deposit $7.50. 

375. Applied Organic Chemistry. Consideration of organic chem- 
istry with special reference to Home Economics. Study, estimation and 
preparation of some of the more important compounds. Serves as a 
foundation for physiological chemistry. Prerequisite 110; lectures 2; 
recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 4y 3 ; deposit $7.50. 

376. Food Chemistry. Consideration of constituents entering into 
composition of foods with quantitative estimation. Methods of analysis 
of foods; milk, butter, oleomargarine, ice cream, cereal foods, detection 
of coloring matter and food preservatives. Prerequisite 375; lectures 
2; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3%; deposit $7.50. 

403. Physiological Chemistry. Home Economics students. Chem- 
istry of the human body, its food, organic and inorganic and the 
changes which these undergo during the process of nutrition. Prere- 
quisite 376; recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3y 3 ; deposit $7.50. 

DAIRY 

10. Domestic Dairying. Nutritive and economic value of milk; its 
dietetics and hygiene; market milk, infants' milk, invalids' milk, cream, 
ice cream, condensed milk, malted milk, dried milk, fermented milks 
(Kephir, Koumiss), buttermilk, butter and cheese. Demonstrations are 
given in types of butter and cheese, and in testing the purity of milk 
and butter. Prerequisite Chem. 375; lectures and labs. 2; credit 2; 
fee $2.50. 

12. Farm Dairying. Secretion, composition, testing, separation and 
acidity of niilk, preparation of starters, ripening of cream, and churning 
and packing butter. Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $3.00. 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE 
4. Money and Banking. The principles of money, coinage, paper 
currency, bimetallism; gold and silver production, monetary standards 



-25- 




"Young- Women Take Courses in Buttermaking\ 

and price levels. History and principles of banking, with a considera- 
tion of financial crises and banking problems, including agricultural 
credit. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

110. Agricultural Economics. Historical and comparative agricul- 
tural systems, land tenure, size of farms, co-operation, taxation, prices, 
transportation, marketing, land credit, the relation of the state to 
agriculture. Recitations 3; credit 3. 

424. Rural Sociology. A study of rural social life and means to its 
improvement; social forces and factors affecting the quantity and 
quality of the rural population, institutions and organizations; com- 
parison of the country with city as regards birth-rate, death-rate, long- 
evity, marriage, divorce, criminality, leadership, standards of morality, 
standards of living, thrift, public opinion, etc. Recitations 3; credit 3. 

ENGLISH 

10. Narration and Description. Expository and suggestive descrip- 
tion; better vocabulary through search for the specific word; simple 
and complex narrative with incidental description; plot and character- 
ization; securing interest, as well as clearness and good order; analysis 
of good models. Themes daily, to train the student to apply the prin- 
ciples studied. Recitations 3; credit 3; fee 25 cents. 

11. Exposition. Principles and methods of expository writing; log- 
ical basis in definition and division; different types of exposition, with 
study of models; careful attention to the construction of paragraphs 
and the making of plans and outlines; a short theme almost daily, with 
longer ones occasionally, constant emphasis on the application of the 
principles studied. Recitations 3; credit 3; fee 25 cents. 

230. Literature of Modern Life. The major writers of the nineteenth 
century, with preliminary survey of the earlier periods; the Victorian 
period with special attention to Browning, Carlyle, and one of the 
greater novelists. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

401. Chakespeare. The great dramas. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

412. Argumentation. The two methods, the inductive and the de- 
ductive, of drawing inferences and establishing truth; how to detect 



■26- 



fallacies and how to guard against them; abstracting, collating, and 
classifying arguments on both sides of some live questions of present 
importance; organizing a large mass of material and developing it into 
a logical brief; analysis of good models; writing forensics. Recitations 
2; credit 2; fee 25 cents. 

417. The Short Itory. The short story from the time of its develop- 
ment as a distinct literary form to the present time; the various types, 
with principal attention to the product of the last fifty years in France, 
England, and the United States. Credit 2 hours. 

FARM CROPS 

1. Corn Production. Structure and adaptation of the corn plant; 
methods of selecting, storing, testing, grading, planting, cultivating and 
harvesting. Cost of production, uses of the crop, commercial marketing, 
insects and diseases. Field study of corn with reference to per cent 
stand and correlation of the parts of the stalk. Laboratory study of the 
structure of the stalk, ear, and kernel. Scoring and judging of single 
and ten-ear samples. Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $1.00. 

2. Small Grain Production. Oats, wheat, barley and rye; their 
botanical structure, soil and climatic adaptations, seed selection, seed 
bed preparation and seeding, harvesting and uses; insects and diseases. 
Laboratory study of plants of each small grain crop; scoring, judging 
and market grading of the different grains. Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr. ; 
credit 2%; fee $1.00. 

33. Forage Crop Production. Grasses, legumes and other plants 
suitable for pasture, hay, silage and soiling. Botanical structure, soil and 
climatic adaptation, cultural and harvesting methods, and uses of the 
different forage plants. Identification of the plants, their seed and the 
common adulterants. Prerequisites 1 and 2; recitation 2; lab. 1, 2 hrs.; 
credit 2%; fee $2.00. 

FARM MANAGEMENT 
. 2. Farm Management. Farming as a business; factors controlling 
the success of farming as found in farm surveys; types of farming, 
farm layout, forms of tenure and leases, organization and management 




College Fields Give Opportunity for Field Study of Crops. 



-27- 

of successful farms. Lectures and recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr; credit 
2%; fee $1.00. 

FORESTRY 
36. Applied Lumbering. Logging and milling operations, including 
a detailed study of each operation in the production of lumber. Tools 
and machines used, and costs of operations. The consideration of a 
specified tract of timber for logging; location of camps, roads, rail- 
roads, chutes. Equipment necessary, and estimated cost of each oper- 
ation. Summer Camp. Prerequisite 54; credit 3. 

56. Camp Technique. Personal equipment for camp life; camp and 
cooking equipment. Camp food. Ration lists for trips of different kinds. 
Useful knots. Practice in throwing various packing hitches. Emergency 
equipment in case of sickness or accident. First aid practice. Summer 
Camp. Field and Demonstration work; credit 1. 

57. Applied Forest Mensuration. The scaling of logs, the determin- 
ing of the volume of other forest products, and the reconnaissance of 
timbered areas. Complete reconnaissance of a specified area, including 
the running of primary and secondary base lines, the estimating and 
mapping of the timber by types, the making of contour maps, the writ- 
ing of forest descriptions by watersheds, etc. Summer Camp. Pre- 
requisite 32; credit 5. 

58. Field Silviculture. A continuation of 52. Forest types; factors 
determining each. Type mapping. Natural reproduction of the forest 
under varying conditions. Improvement cuttings. Marking timber for 
cutting with reference to the silvicultural systems. Summer Camp. 
Prerequisite 52; credit 3. 

66. General Field Forestry. This course is designed to be taken by 
students who desire a general knowledge of the subject of Forestry. 
The work will consist of lectures, special readings, field and laboratory 
work. The course includes fundamentals of forestry; identification and 
classification of trees, through bark and twig characteristics; identifica- 
tion of the common woods; the value of the forest for shelterbelts; 
protection from erosion; the value of the farm woodlot; trees most suit- 
able for planting different types of land in the State, and the progress 
of forestry in Iowa and in the United States. 

The course will give the student good, general work in Forestry. 
It would be especially desirable for teachers of agriculture in this or 
adjoining states. Lectures, recitations, laboratory work and field trips. 
Credit 4 hrs. No prerequisites. 

Summer School Work in Forestry: The summer school in Forestry 
c'uring 1917 will be held in three different locations. In the first session 
the subjects of Camp Technique and Applied Forest Mensuration will 
be taken up. This work will be carried on in the forested region ad- 
joining the Mississippi River in Iowa. In this work the students will 
be given practice in the various field operations, including the systems 
of measuring trees and stands in the forest, as well as preparing topo- 
graphic, type, and other maps for use in Forest Management. General 
field forestrv, an elementary course, will also be offered during the 
first half. 

In the second session of the summer school the subjects of Applied 
Lumbering and Field Silviculture will be taken up. The work in these 
courses will be taken in th? vicinities of Cloquet and Cass Lake, Min- 
nesota. In the former, a splendid opportunity will be given for de- 
tailed studies of large logging and milling operations. The vicinity of 
Cass Lake will afford the students splendid opportunities for various 
silvicultural studies. 

The Department furnishes tents, cots, dishes, etc., and the students 
are required to furnish their bedding and other personal effects, as 



-28- 

well as to pay their transportation expenses. For details, address 
G. B. MacDonald, Professor of Forestry. 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

Science as related to the farm and home is being called for more 
and more as a high school study and there is a constant demand for 
teachers prepared to give instruction in science with these important 
applications. This development has led to the offering in the Summer 
Session of general science work as related to farm operations and 
work in the home. Organized in this way, science becomes funda- 
mental to advanced and even elementary work in agriculture and 
home economics, and in this form it meets the demands of the agricul- 
tural community far better than science as it has been commonly 
taught. 

1. General Science. An introductory general science course. Usable 
facts of science applied to an understanding of the problems of the 
home and the farm. Especially adapted for high school teachers in con- 
solidated schools who are in direct contact with rural conditions. 
Recitations 2; lab. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 3y 3 . 

HISTORY 

24. Economic History of American Agriculture. A preliminary sur- 
vey of the economic history of American agriculture as a field for in- 
vestigation followed by a study of colonial agriculture; the westward 
movement of pioneer and planter into the Mississippi Valley; the 
agrarian revolution and the opening of the far West; and the reorgan- 
ization of the agricultural industry. Special attention will be given to 
the origin, growth, control, and disposition of the public domain; the 
settlement of the West; the various influences affecting the growth of 
the agricultural industry and of agricultural society in the different 
sections; relation of agriculture to related industries, to politics, and 
to legislation; and a historical and comparative analysis of some of 
the present day problems confronting the farming class: tenancy, trans- 
portation, and rural organization. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

34. American Government and Politics. Introductory survey of the 
historical foundations of American government; general features of the 
federal system; nomination, election, and powers of the president; 
powers of congress; the supreme court; foreign affairs; national de- 
fense; government of territories; the state executive department, the 
legislature, and the judicial system; municipal government, including 
a study of the mayor and council system, the commission system, and 
the commission-manager plan; local rural government; social and 
economic legislation. Recitations 3; credit 3. 

7G. Seminar in the Economic history of Agriculture in Iowa, 2 hours 
credit. 

Note: Students desiring credit in History 14 may take History 24 or 
History 34 as a substitute. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

While all the work in home economics is organized from the stand- 
point of homemaking and vocational requirements, yet the particular 
demands a1 this time have led to the organization of special studies 
for the 1017 Summer Session. These are studies 90, 91, and 92, indi- 
cated below. The first two of these will give specific vocational train- 
ing in dressmaking and millinery; the third will give teachers and ad- 
ministrators the basic theory for adapting this work to vocational ends. 

1 Textiles and Clothing. A complete course in straight line draft- 
ing of patterns. Hand sewing, including the simple and fancy stitches, 
the making of buttonholes, and their application to useful hand-made 
gai ments. The use and care of machines, and the making of a machine 



-29- 

made garment. A detailed study of the "cotton industry." Recitation 
1; lab. 2; credit 2y 3 ; fee $2.00. 

4. Textiles and Clothing. The designing and use of drafted pat- 
terns in the making of lingerie undergarments, a shirtwaist, and a tail- 
ored dress. Economical cutting of material, fitting of garments, and 
choice of materials from the standpoint of economy and beauty. House- 
hold mending — patching and darning. A detailed study of the linen in- 
dustry. Prerequisite 1; recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 2y 3 fee $2. 

21a. Training in Teaching Home Economics. This course is a sum- 
mer session adaptation of the regular course in special methods and 
practice teaching. It is planned for teachers of home economics in 
grades and high schools. It includes a study of the choice of suitable 
subject matter, method of presentation, equipment, illustrative mater- 
ial and a comparison of the more recent text books designed for grade 
and high school classes. Special emphasis will be placed upon the 
planning of work in home economics for vocational schools in which 
foods may be prepared in large quantities in connection with the 
school lunch room, or where courses in dressmaking and millinery 
lead directly to trade work. Recitation 2; credit 2. 

43. Foods: Selection and Preparation. Foods, their history, manu- 
facture, production, composition, cost, and economic value. Effect of 
heat upon foods, and the principles involved in the preparation of typi- 
cal foods. Special attention to acquiring ease and accuracy in the ac- 
tual cooking processes. Prerequisite, Chem. 109; recitation 1; labs. 
2, 2 hrs.; credit 2%; fee $5.00. 

44. Foods: Selection and Preparation. Continuation of 43. Pre- 
requisite 43; recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 2y 3 ; fee $5.00. 

45. Nutrition and Dietetics. Fundamental principles of human nu- 
trition and the application of these principles under varying physiolog- 
ical, economic, and social conditions; laboratory problems in the plan- 
ning and preparation of dietaries for various types of normal individ- 
uals in infancy, childhood, adolescence, adult life, and old age. For 
the family group with diverse conditions of activity, age, and financial 
circumstances. Prerequisites, Chem. 403, Zool. 150, and H. Ec. 49; 
recitation 1; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3%; fee $6.00. 

46. Nutrition and Dietetics. Continuation of 45, with a study of 
therapeutic cookery and special attention to diet in disease. Prere- 
quisite 45; recitation 1; labs. 3, 2 hrs.; credit 3y 3 ; fee $6.00. 

48. Foods: Advanced Cookery. Food preservation: making pre- 
serves, jellies, and pickles; canning fruits and vegetables; use of dif- 
ferent kinds of jars and by different methods. A review and applica- 
tion of the principles outlined in sophomore cookery, with more elab- 
orate processes. Prerequisite Chem. 376; recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; 
credit 2y 3 ; fee $5.00. 

49. Foods: Marketing, Preparation, and Serving of Meals. Practice 
in making of the menu with reference to the season, cost, availability 
of foods, and combinations. Marketing: actual experience in selecting 
and purchasing in the local markets of the foods to be prepared, keep- 
ing within a definite amount. The different forms and types of service; 
suitability and adaptability to existing conditions. Cooking and serving 
of the daily meals for special occasions by different groups. The work 
in planning, preparing, and serving of these meals is a summing up of 
all the laboratory work which has preceded in the sophomore and 
junior years. Prerequisite 48; recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2y 3 ; 
fee $5.00. 

50. Drawing. Free hand drawing and pencil sketching from still life 
groups; plant and flower forms and the costumed figure. Color analy- 
sis, contrast, and tone-value, with the practice of mixing colors. Simple 



-30- 

problems in lettering; construction and spacing of letters. These prob- 
lems are to develop the sense of proportion and of color. Recitation 1; 
labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $2.00. 

51. Applied Design... Theory and principles of design; harmony, 
rhythm, balance, and subordination. These principles are first applied 
to simple abstract problems and later developed more elaborately in 
color. Prerequisite 50; recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2V 3 ; fee $2. 

70. Experimental Problems in Foods. The types of cooking ap- 
paratus; comparison of the cost of fuels; the types of food products, 
and the changes which occur in the preparation of foods. Elective. 

Prerequisite, Chem. 376, Physics 330, H. Ec. 44 or 74; recitation 1; 
labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2y 3 ; fee $5.00. 

90. Dressmaking, using shop methods in designing, buying, cutting, 
fitting, and finishing. Recitation 1; lab. 2; credit 1%. 

91. Millinery, presenting shop methods in the construction of vari- 
ous types of frames and trimmings. Recitation 1; lab. 2; credit 1% 

92. This study will consider the scope and meaning of vocational 
education in home economics. It is planned with the view of giving 
professionally trained teachers of home economics and school admin- 
istrators a clear understanding of the demands which are bound to 
come under the Smith-Hughes Act. A most important point in this 
connection will be the distinction between vocational education and 
general home economics education. Recitation 1; credit 1. (Three 
weeks only.) 

HORTICULTURE 

3. General Horticulture. Fruit growing and vegetable culture. Gen- 
eral exercises in propagation, planting, and management of fruits and 
vegetables. Recitations 2; labs. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $1.00. 

38. Plant Propagation. Asexual and sexual methods; germinating, 
testing, and storage of seeds; multiplication of plants by cuttage, layer- 
age, and graftage; nursery methods and management. Prerequisites, 
Botany 268 or 269, Chem. 351; recitation 1; lectures and lab. 1, 2 hr.; 
credit 2; fee $1.00. 

104. Grapes and Small Fruits. Culture, harvesting, and marketing 
of the strawberry, raspberry, grape, currant, and other small fruits. 
Perequisite 1, 3 or 38; recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 3. 

333. Truck Farming. Growing and marketing of the more important 
truck crops, such as the potato, cabbage, onion, and tomato. The 
trucking interests of Iowa. Recitations 2; credit 2. 

408. Landscape Architecture. Fundamental principles and styles of 
the art. Planning of rural, suburban, city, and home grounds; a consid- 
eration of public and semi-public property such as reservations, parks, 
school grounds, church yards, cemeteries, railroad station grounds; 
improvement of rural and town communities from the landscape gar- 
dening point of view. Lecture 2; credit 2. 

MANUAL TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

The manual training and industrial arts courses are organized at 
present under other departments. The manual training courses in 
wood work are listed under Mechanical Engineering as courses 140, 
241, and 331. The courses in mechanical and industrial drawing 
are listed under Mechanical Engineering as courses 121, 141, and 181. 
Industrial arts courses are listed under Agricultural Engineering — 
courses 1, 39, 40. These courses, together with courses 141 and 331 
in Mechanical Engineering, are organized on a vocational basis and 
Should appeal to manual training teachers as offering an opportunity 
for securing work which will help to meet the increasing demand for 
the vocational type of work in our schools. 



. 



—31— 

MATHEMATICS 

17. Algebra and Trigonometry. Definitions; positive and negative 
angles; circular measures of angles; operations upon angles; functions 
of angles, their relations and varying values; determination of values of 
the functions of particular angles; functions of different angles ex- 
pressed in terms of those of a basal angle; derivation and reduction of 
trigonometric formulas; solution of right and oblique triangles. Use of 
logarithms, solution of right and oblique triangles, with practical ap- 
plication. Prerequisite, entrance algebra; recitations 3; credit 3. 

40. Algebra. This course covers the work taken up during the first 
four weeks of College Algebra and is devoted to a review of the funda- 
mental principles of algebra up to and including quadratic equations. 

It is an excellent preparation for any student planning to enter col- 
lege from a non-accredited high school and the record will be taken in 
lieu of the entrance examination in mathematics for such students. For 
those who have been out of high school for a number of years and need 
review or for teachers desiring to take examinations for certificates, it 
will prove a very desirable course. It should not be taken by those who 
have not had at least a year of work in algebra in high school or its 
equivalent. No college credit is given. 

43. Plane Analytic Geometry. Representation of points, lines and 
curves in a plane, careful study of the graphs of equations, and inves- 
tigation of the line, the circle, and the conic sections. Recitations 4; 
credit 4. 

45. Calculus. Differential calculus — expansion of functions, indeter- 
minate forms, tangents, normals, asymptotes, direction of curvature, 
points of inflexion, radius of curvature, envelopes, and maxima and 
minima; integral calculus — applications made to determining areas, 
lengths of curves, surfaces of revolution, volumes of solids of revolu- 
tion and other solids, applications of double integration to areas, sur- 
faces, centers of gravity. Elements of differential equations. Prere- 
quisite 44; recitations 5; credit 5. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

121. Mechanical Drawing. Use of drawing instruments, practice in 
lettering and detailing, making of isometric and shop drawings. Labs. 
2, 3 hrs.; credit 2. 

140. Manual Training. Care and adjustment of hand and power 
tools, joinery, cabinet making, wood finishing, polishing and varnishing, 
wood turning, and carving. For students in idustrial science and home 
economics who desire to teach manual training. Recitation 1; lab. 1, 
4 hrs.; credit 1%; fee $2.00. 

141. Vocational Drawing. Use of drawing instruments; ortho- 
graphic projection; isometric and working drawings. For teachers in 
manual training and consolidated schools. Labs. 2, 3 hrs.; credit 2. 

181. Mechanical Drawing. Same as 121 but less complete. Lab. 1, 
3 hrs.; credit 1. 

219. Projective Drawing. Principles of projection of the point, line, 
and plane as applied in the preparation of general and detail engineer- 
ing, drawings of machines and structures. Prerequisite 121 or 181; 
recitation 1; lab. 1, 3 hrs.; credit 3. 

220. Projective Drawing. Same as 219 but less complete. Prere- 
quisite 121 or 181; recitation 1; lab. 1, 3 hrs.; credit 2. 

245. Vocational Wood Work. Advanced work in manual training 
for teachers; courses of instruction for rural and graded schools; de- 
tailed study of tools; bench and lathe work to meet needs of individual 
students. Prerequisite 140, or equivalent; lectures and lab. 1, 4 hrs.; 
credit 1%; fee $2.00. 



-32- 

331. Pattern Work. Principles of joinery, wood turning and carving,. 
and foundry practice applied to making of simple patterns and core 
boxes for cast iron, brass, and aluminum castings. Prerequisite 232; 
labs. 2, 3 hrs.; credit 2; fee $5.00. 

401. Mechanics of Engineering. Principles of pure mechanics as ap- 
plied in engineering problems involving statics, graphics, and strength 
of materials. Prerequisite Math. 44; recitations 3; credit 3. 

MUSIC 

Members of the Summer School and others desiring musical instruc- 
tion will be offered courses in Voice and Piano. The regular Summer 
Course in music will consist of three lessons a week, private lessons. 
These lessons are extra and not included in the regular college fee and 
must be arranged for with the director of the School of Music. The 
fees are payable in advance at the Treasurer's Office. 

Any one desiring a lesser number of lessons than the regular Sum- 
mer Course will pay a slightly higher rate than the following prices: 

Three lessons a week in Voice $18.00 for six weeks. 

Three lessons a week in Piano, $18.00 for six weeks. 

The practice pianos of the School of Music will be at the disposal of 
students at the following rates: One hour a day for the six weeks or 
less, $1.50; two hours a day, $2.50; three hours a day, $3.50. 

These are the regular rates charged in this department during the 
college year. For further details address. 

J. C. Harris 
Director, School of Music. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE (For Women) 

P. C. S-l. Elementary Gymnastics. Swedish, folk dancing, games, 
light apparatus. Lab. 1 hr. daily; fee $2.50. 

Equivalent to P. C. 1 and 2. Indoor work as stated in college catalog. 

P. C. S-2. Swimming. Instruction for beginners only. Lab. 1 hr„ M. 
W. F.. 

The swimming pool will be open afternoons and evenings for all who 
know how to swim. Swimming suits may be rented or purchased from 
the department. 

To all students classified in P. C. S-l who have a final average of 
85% and who have satisfactorily completed at least four hours of prac- 
tice teaching in the gymnasium, will be granted an official recom- 
mendation from the department. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING (For Men) 

5. Theory and Practice of Coaching. Theory of Play. Sportsman- 
ship. Rules. Training. Physiology. Anatomy. Hygiene. Actual 
Competition. Actual Coaching. Lecture 1; lab. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 2%. 

7. Playground and Gymnasium. This work, along with Course 5, 
should enable one to manage the physical training work in the average 
Iowa system. Lecture and lab. I 1 /-*; credit 1. 

PHYSICS. 

205. Mechanics, Heat, and Light. Fundamental principles of physics 
and their applications. Prerequisite Math. 17; lecture 1; recitation 1; 
Lab. 1, 2 hrs.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

404. Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Sound. Prerequisite 303; 
lectures and recitations 5; lab. 1, 2 hrs.; credit 5; fee $2.00. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

C. Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence. Characteristics of 
childhood and the significant mental changes of the adolescent period; 
the Individual, the parental, and the social instincts; the adaptive in- 



—33- 

stincts— imitation, curiosity, play; the regulative instinct, moral and 
religious; the collecting and the constructive instincts. The Montessori 
system and its application, illustrated by simple apparatus; the kinder- 
garten; the educational value of play. The psychology of adolescence; 
the boy scout movement, the girls' camp-fire, athletics. The psychology 
of cooking clubs and corn-judging contests. Recitations 3; credit 3. 

7. Outlines of Psychology. An introduction to the study of the 
normal adult human mind. A foundation for all the other studies in 
Psychology. (Not open to Freshmen.) Recitations 3; credit 3. 

8. Educational Psychology. A treatment of special phases of Gen- 
eral and Genetic Psychology which are most applicable to education. 
The processes of adaptation; instinct, impulse, habit, and will; the ap- 
plied psychology of perception, imagination, memory, association, at- 
tention, interest, simple feelings, emotions, and the higher thought pro- 
cesses; special problems; mental inheritance, the learning curve, indi- 
vidual differences, etc. (Not open to Freshmen.) Recitations 3; 
credit 3. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

2. The Fundamentals of Public Speaking. To help the student get 
command of himself. Attention is especially given to voice building 
and expression. Recitation 1; credit 1. 

3. Interpretation. Methods of vocal interpretation, criticism and 
delivery. Beside the class lectures and class exercises on topics per- 
taining to interpretation and delivery, each student is instructed pri- 
vately and personally at stated intervals throughout the semester. Pre- 
requisite 2 or its equivalent; recitations 2; credit 2. 

10. Extempore Speech. To develop the powers of sincere and effect- 
ive public speaking. The fundamental principles of speech organiza- 
tion and delivery studied according to the true extemporaneous method. 
The assimilation of the essentials of effective speaking and the work- 
ing out of these essentials into actual practice before the audience. 
Each student is given the opportunity to appear in an original speech 
before his fellow students at least once every week or ten days. Reci- 
tations 2; credit 2. 

SOILS 

103. Special Problems in Soil Physics. Experimentation relating to 
the physical characteristics of soils and their relation to crop produc- 
tion. A wide range of special subjects. Special advantages for a study 
of the physical composition of soils. Prerequisites 121 or 141; investi- 
gations 6 hrs.; credit 2; deposit $4.00. 

141. Soil Physic. The origin, formation and classification of soils. 
A study of moisture, temperature and aeration in soils, together with 
the conditions influencing changes in these factors. The proper prepar- 
ation of seed beds by ordinary farm operations in relation to the secur- 
ing of optimum physical soil conditions. A general study of all the 
physical properties of soils. Prerequisites Physics 205 or 303; recita- 
tions 2; labs. 2, 2 hrs; credit 3V 3 ; deposit $4.00. 

304. Special Problems in Soil Fertility. Experimentation relating 
to maintaining and increasing the productive capacity of soils. A study 
of soil taken from the home farm, with a view of determining the 
best systems of soil and crop management. Valuable for men who ex- 
pect to farm under corn-belt conditions. Prerequisites 322 or 342; in- 
vestigations 6 hrs.; credit 2; deposit $5.00. 

342. Soil Fertility. Maintenance of fertility; the influence of com- 
mercial fertilizers, barnyard manure and green manure upon the qual- 
ity and yield of various crops; the effect of different crops upon the 
fertility of the soils and upon succeeding crops; different systems of 



■34— 



rotation, and the effect upon the productiveness of the soil of various 
methods of soil management. Fertility of samples of soils from the 
home farm or any other soil. Prerequisites 141 and Chem. 352; for 
Dairy, Chem. 352 only; for Hort, Ag. Ed., and Ag. Eng., 141 only; reci- 
tations 2; lab. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 3%; deposit $8.00. 




Determining' Soil Analysis in Laboratory. 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS 



Where schedules can be changed to the advantage of some students 
without inconvenience to others, changes will be made on Monday 
evening,, June 11th. 

Recitations daily unless otherwise specified. 

Abbreviations: A. Ed. — Agricultural Education. A. E. — Agricultural Engi- 
neering. A. J. — Agricultural Journalism. Ag. H. Agricultural Hall. A. H. — 
Animal Husbandry. Bac. — Bacteriology. Bot. — Botany. Cen. — Central 
Building. Chem. — Chemistry. C. B. — Chemistry Building. D. B. — Dairy 
Building. Econ. — Economics. En. An. — Engineering Annex. En. H. — Engi- 
neering Hall. Eng. — English. F C. — Farm Crops. F. Mang. — Farm Manage- 
ment. For. — Forestry. Geol. — Geology. Gen. Sc. — General Science. Gym. — Gym- 
nasium. H. E. — Home Economics. H. E. B. — Home Economics Building. Hist. 
— History. Hort. — Horticulture. Lab. — Laboratory. Lit. — Literature. L. P. — 
Lower Pavilion. M. H. — Margaret Hall. Math. — Mathematics. M. E. — 
Mechanical Engineering. O. A. — Old Agricultural Hall. P. C. — Physical 
Culture. P. S. — Pattern Shop. Phys. — Physics. Psych. — Psychology. 
Pub. Sp. — Public Speaking. R. — Room. Rec. — Recitation. Sc. B. — Science 
Building. U. P. — Upper Pavilion. Zool. — Zoology. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 

(First Half) 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


A. E. 1 


Lab. 9-12 T. Th. S. 






100 O. A. 




A. E. 5 


Rec. 8 Lab. 3-5 Tu, Th 


. Sat. 




204 O. A. 




A. E. 19 


Rec. 9 M. W. F. 






204 O. A. 




A. E. 36 


Lab. 10-12 M. W. F. 






204 O. A. 




A. E. 39 


Lab. 2-5 M. W. F. 






100 O. A. 




A. E. 40 


Lab. 2-5 T. Th. S. 






100 O. A. 




A. Ed. 1 


Rec. 2 daily 






210 Ag. H. 




A. Ed. 2 


Rec. 7 daily 






210 Ag H. 




A. Ed. 4 


Rec. 9 daily 






109 Ag H. 




A. Ed. 7 


Rec. 10 daily 






11 Cen. 




A. Ed. 9 


Rec. 11 daily 






208 Ag H. 




A. Ed. 21-a 


Rec. 1 daily 






10 H. E. 




A. Ed. 31 


Rec. 9 daily (Vocational 8: 


00 


306 Ag. H. 






daily) (Normal Tr. 2 


:00 M. W. 








F., Lab. 3-5 daily) 










A. J. 8, 11 


Rec. 9 daily 






19 Ag H. 




A. J. 9, 12 


Rec. 3 daily 






19 Ag H. 




A. H. 1 


Sec. 1 7-9, Sec. 2 3-5 






U. P. 




A. H. 2 


10-12 






U. P. 




A. H. 3 


Rec. 3, Lab. 7 






120 Ag H., L. 


P. 


A. H. 4 


Rec. 4, Lab. 10-12 






109 Ag H., L. 


P. 


Bac. 1 


Rec. 10, Lab. 6-3 hr. 






105 Sc. B. 




Bac. 15 


Rec. 10, Lab. 3-2 hr. 






105 Sc. B. 




Bac. 18 


Rec. 7, Lab. 2 hrs. daily 8 




105 Sc. B. 




Bac. 30 


As arranged 






105 Sc. B. 




Bot. 560 


Rec. 10 M. W. F., Lab. 
Th. Sat. 


1-3 Tu. 




312 Cen. 




Bot. 161 


| Rec. 8 M. W. F., Lab. 3-5 M. W 


. F. 


312 Cen. 




Bot. 470 


| Rec. 11, Lab. 1-4 






312 Cen. 




Chem. 103 


| Rec. 9 daily 2 M. W. F 


., Lab. 10-1 








daily 






15 C. B. 




Chem. 107 


| Rec. 9 daily, 2 M. W. 
12 daily 


F., Lab. 


10- 


15 C. B. 




Chem. 109 


| Rec. 9 daily, 2 M. W. 


F., Lab. 


10- 


1 





-36- 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS— Continued 



Chem. 351 

Chem. 375 

Chem. 403 
Dairy 10 
Dairy 12 
Econ. 110 
Econ. 424 
Eng. 10 
Eng. 11 
Eng. 412 
Eng. 401 
Eng. 230 
F. C. 1 
F. C. 2 
F. C. 33 
F. Mang 2 
Gen. Sc. 1 
Hist. 34 
Hist. 24 
Hist. 76 
H. E. 1-4 
H. E. 43-44 
H. E. 45-46 
H. E. 48-49 
H. E. 50-51 
H. E. 90 
H. E. 91 
H. E. 92 
Hort. 3 
Hort. 408 
Hort. 104 
Math. 17 
Math. 40 
Math. 43 
Math. 45 
M. E. 121 
M. E. 140 

M. E. 181 
M. E. 219 
M. E. 220 
M. E. 245 

M. E. 331 

M. E. 401 
P. C. S-l 
P. r. S-2 
Phy. Ti. 5 
Phy. Tr. 7 
Phys. 205 

Phys. 404 



2 M. W. F., Lab. 



12 daily 
|Rec. 11 daily, M. W. F., Lab. 8- | 

10 daily 
| Rec. 7 daily 
8-10 daily 

Rec. 9 daily, Lab. 7-9 daily 

Rec. 8 daily 

Rec. 10 daily, Lab. 3-5, M. W. F. 

Rec. 10 daily, 2 M. W. F. 

Rec. 8 daily, 9 Tu. Th. S. 

Rec. 9 daily, 4 M. W. F. 

Rec. 10 daily, 1 Tu. Th. S. 

Rec. 2 

Rec. 4 

Rec. 3 

Rec. 9 daily, Lab. 1-3 M. W. F. 

Rec. 8 daily, Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. S. 

Rec. 7 daily, Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. S. 

Rec. 10 daily, Lab. 3-5 M. W. F. 

Rec. 9 daily, Lab. 1-3 

Rec. 11 daily, 1 M. W. F. 

Rec. 8 daily 

As arranged 

Rec. 7 daily, Lab. 8-12 

Rec. 7 daily, Lab. 8-12 

8-12 daily, 1-4 daily 

Rec. 7, Lab. 8-12 daily 

Rec. 7, Lab. 8-12 daily 

Rec. 2 daily, Lab. 3-5 

Rec. 2 daily, Lab. 3-5 

Rec. 1 daily 

Rec. 9, Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. S. 

Rec. 10 daily 

Rec. 7 daily, Lab. 1-3 M. W. F. 

Rec. 9 daily, 1 M. W. F. 

Rec. 8 

Rec. 9 daily, 1 daily 

Rec. 9 daily, 2 daily 

1-5 

Rec. 7 Tu. Th. S., Lab. 8-10, 10-12 
1-3, 3-5 

1-5 

Rec. 10 M. W. F., Lab. 8-12 

Rec. 10 M. W. F., Lab. 8-12, 1-5 

Rec. 7 M. W. F., Lab. 8-10, 10-12 
1-3, 3-5 

8-10, 1-5 

Rec. 8 

* r > daily 

5-6 M. W. F. 

4-6 daily 

3 M. Tu. W. Th. 

Rec. 9 M. W. F. S., 4 M. W. F., 
Lab. 10-12 M. W. Th. 
| Rec. 8 daily, 3 daily, Lab. 10-12 
M. W. Th. 



C. B. 

|J8G C. B. 

|15 C. B. 
jl25 C. B. 
|11 D. B. 

|il D. B. 
|222 Cen. 
|222 Cen. 
113 Cen. 
|13 Cen. 

13 Cen. 
|ll Cen. 
|13 Cen. 

307 Ag. H. 
1 307 Ag. H. 
|307 Ag. H. 

307 Ag. H. 

|288 C. B. 
J208 Cen. 
1208 Cen. 

I 

J110 H. E. 
|202 H. E. 
|200 H. E. 
J208 H. E. 
206 H. E. 
'110 H. E. 
110 H. E. 

14 H. E. 
210 Ag. H. 
208 Ag. H. 
208 Ag. H. 
1 215 Cen. 
213 Cen. 
il4 Cen. 
213 Cen. 
403 En. H. 

J203 En. A. 

|403 En. H. 

1403 En. H. 

|403 En. H. 

I 

|203 En. A. 

P. S. 

205 En. H. 

M. H. Gym. 

|M. H. Gym. 

|205 Gym. 

J205 Gym. 

I 

1207 En. H. 



1*207 En. H. 



-37- 



Psych. 6 


Rec. 10 daily, 4 Tu. 


Th. S. 


210 Cen. 


Psych. 7 


Rec. 8 daily, 4 M. W 


. F. 


210 Cer. 


Pub. Sp. 2 


Rec. 10 M. W. F. 




311 Cen. 


Pub. Sp. 3 


Rec. 7 daily 




311 Cen. 


Pub. Sp. 10 


Rec. 11 daily 




311 Cen. 


Soils 141 


Rec. 8, Lab. 10-12 




7 Ag. H. 


Soils 342 


Rec. 9. Lab. 1-3 




■1 Ag. H. 


Soils 103 


As arranged 






Soils 304 


As arranged 







GENERAL AND RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSES 






(First Half) 




Course 




Hour of Recitation 


Room 


Agriculture S-3 




Sec. 1, 10-12 


; Old Hort. Lab7~~ 






Sec. 2, 3-5 


|01d Hort. Lab. 


Agriculture S-4 




1-3 


|12 D. B. 


Didactics I 




Rec. 8 


110 Cen. 


Didactics II 




Rec. 3 


|10 Cen. 


Didactics III 




Rec. 2 


10 Cen. 


Home Economics 


30 


8-10 


|100 H. E. 


Home Economics 


31 


10-12 


|100 H. E. 


Home Economics 


35 


3-5 


[200 H. E. 


Home Economics 


36 


1-3 


|210 H. E. 


Home Economics 


32 


3-5 


J101 H. E. 


Home Economics 


37 


10-12 


1202 H. E. 


Home Economics 


38 


8 10 


|14 H. E. 


Manual Training 


S-6 


Sec. 1. 8-10; Sec. 2, 1-5 


1302 En. An. 


Music 




As arranged 


i 


-Physical Culture S-l 


4-5 daily 


IM. H. Gym. 


* Algebra 40 




8 


|213 Cen. 


* Civics 34 




11 daily, 1 M. W. F. 


1208 Cen. 


* Drawing 50-51 




Rec. 7, Labs. 8-12 


1206 H. E. 


* Economics 110 




10 daily, 2 M. W. F. 


J222 Cen. 


* English 10 




9 daily, 4 M. W. F. 


113 Cen. 


:;: English 11 




10 daily, 1 T. Th. S. 


|13 Cen. 


♦History 24 




8 daily 


|208 Cen. 


-Physics 205 




9 M. W. F. S., 4 M. W. 


F. ,207 E.ig. H. 


♦Reading 3 




7 daily 


|311 Cen 



♦College Credit Courses. 

MODEL SCHOOL PROGRAM 

Room 1, Central, Grades First and Third. 

Room 3, Central, Grades Fifth and Eighth. 

Note: Work in the model school begins at 8 o'clock and continues 
until 11:30. In the lower grades emphasis will be placed upon reading, 
language, numbers, busy work. History, geography and nature work 
will be secondary and more or less related to the language and story 
work. 

The work in the upper grades will place greater emphasis upon Eng- 
lish, arithmetic, physiology and geography and will also demonstrate 
the possibilities of work in home economics and agriculture, The rural 
school plan on home economics work will be demonstrated three days 
each week. The work in agriculture will be correlated with the school 
plot at the college and the home project work being carried by the 
pupils. Definite schedule of program is not here given because of the 
necessity of changing the program in order to properly accommodate 
the work for observation purposes. 



SCHEDULE FOR THE SECOND HALF 

Schedule for the second half of the Summer Session is indicated be- 
low. It is thought that this will not need to be modified. At any 
rate, modifications will be made only when students can be better ac- 
commodated. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 
(Second Half) 



Course 


1 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 




A. Ed. 1 


JRec. 


7 daily 


]307 Ag. H. 




A. Ed. 6 


JRec. 


8 daily 


|307 Ag. H. 




A. Ed. 8 


JRec. 


10 daily 


!208 Ag. H. 




A. E. 13 


JRec. 


L, Lab. 2-5, M. W. F. 


|204 O. A. 




A. E. 21 


JRec. 


fe Lab. 3-5 T. Th. S. 


204 O. A. 




A. E. 30 


|Rec. i 


J daily, Lab. 10-12 T. Th. 


S. |204 O. A. 




A. H. 20 


JRec. 


11 daily 


[109 Ag. H. 




A. H. 46-47 


JRec. 


1 daily, 2 Tu. Th. S., Lab. | 






2-5 


M. W. F. 


1110 C. B. 




Chem. 104, 108 


|Rec. 


9 daily, 2 M. W. F., Lab. 1 




110 


| 10-12 daily 


|15 C. B. 




Chem. 352 


|Rec. 


11 daily, Lab. 8-10 daily 


|15 C. B. 




Chem. 376 


|Rec. ' 


J daily, Lab. 8-10 daily 


|15 C. B. 




Econ. 4 


Rec. 


i daily 


|222 Cen. 




Econ. 110 


|Rec. 


3 daily, 11 M. W. F. 


|222 Cen. 




Eng. 417 


|Rec. 2 daily 


)13 Cen. 




Eng. 10 


|Rec. c 


, daily, 4 Tu. Th. S. 


|13 Cen. 




F. C. 1 


|Rec. 9 daily, Lab. 1-3 M. W. F 


|307 Ag. H. 




F. C. 2 


jRec. 10 daily, Lab. 3-5 Tu. Th. 


S. |306 Ag. H. 




Hort. 333 


JRec. 


7 daily 


|208 Ag. H. 




Hort. 38 


|Rec. 8 M. W. F., Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. S.|208 Ag. H. 




M. E. 121 


|8-io, : 


10-12, 1-3, 3-5 


|403 En. H. 




M. E. 140 


|Rec. 7, Tu. Th. S., Lab. 8-10, 10-12, | 






1-3, 


3-5 


|203 En. An. 




M. E. 141 


|8-10, 10-12, 1-3. 3-5. 


|403 En. H. 




M. E. 181 


J8-10, 10-12, 1-3, 3-5. 


1403 En. H. 




M. E. 245 


JRec. 7, M. W. F., Lab. 8-10, 10-12, j 






1-3, 


3-5. 


|203 En. An. 




M. E. 331 


18-10, 10-12, 1-3, 3-5 


|P. S. 




Psych. 7 


|Rec. 11 daily, 4 Tu. Th. S. 


1210 Cen. 




Psych. 8 


|Rec. 9 daily, 4 M. W. F. 


|210 Cen. 




Soils 141 


IRec. 8 daily, Lab. 10-12 daily 


|7 Ag. II. 




RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' 


COURSES 








(Second Half) 






Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 




Agriculture S-3 




Rec. & Lab. 10-12 daily 


|01d Hort. Lab. 




Agriculture S-4 




Rec. & Lab. 3-5 daily 


112 D. B. 




Didactics I 




Rec. 9 daily 


113 Cen. 




Didactics II 




Rec. 11 daily 


113 Cen. 




Home Economics S-32 


Rec. & Lab. 1-3 daily 


1101 H. E. 




Home Economics S-37 


Rec. & Lab. 10-12 daily 


1202 H. E. 




Homo Economics S-38 


Rec. & Lab. 8-10 daily 


'14 H. E. 




Manual Training S-7 


Rec. & Lab. 8-10 daily 


'302 Ei. An. 




Manual Train inj. 


S-15, 








s-ir, 




Rec. & Lab. 1-3 daily 


1210 Ei. An. 




a Ed. 1 




Rec. 7 daily 


1307 Ag. H. 




Economics 110 




Rec. 9 daily, 11 M. W. F 


1222 Cen. 




English 10 




Rec. 3 daily, 4 Tu. Th. S. 


|13 Cen. 




h'r.glish 417 




Rec. 2 daily 


113 Cm. 





College Credit Courses 



39- 



INFORMATION BLANK 

Prospective students are asked to use this blank in furnishing in- 
formation and in making requests for further information. Cut out and 
mail to the Director of Summer Session, Ames, Iowa. 

Check below the courses in which you are interested. Check subject 
and underscore course number. Check other points also. Do not delay 
your inquiry. 

Courses totaling six semester hours, is our recommendation as to 
full time college credit work for each half. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 



.Agricultural Education 1, 2, 4, 
6, 7, 8, 9, 21a, 31, 31a, 31b 

.Agricultural Engineering 1, 
5, 13, 19, 21, 30, 36, 39, 40 

.Agricultural Journalism 8, 9, 
11, 12 



.General Science 1 
.History 24, 34, 76 
.Home Economics 1, 



4, 21a, 



43, 44, 45, 46, 48, 49, 50, 51, 70, 
90, 91, 92 

.Horticulture 3, 38, 104, 333, 

408 



Animal Husbandry 1, 2, 3, 4, Literature 230, 401 



20 

.Bacteriology 1, 15, 18, 30 
.Botany 161, 470, 560 
.Chemistry 103, 104, 107, 108, 
109, 110, 173, 351, 352, 375, 376, 
403 

.Dairying 10, 12 
.Economic Science 4, 110, 424 
.English 10, 11, 412, 417 
.Farm Crops 1, 2, 33 
.Farm Management 2 
-Forestry 36, 56, 57, 58, 66 



.Manual Training 121, 140, 141, 
181, 219, 220, 245, 331 
.Mathematics 17, 40, 43, 45 
.Mechanical Engineering 401 
.Physical Culture S-l, S-2 
.Physical Training 5, 7 
.Physics 205, 404 
.Poultry 46, 47 
.Psychology 6, 7, 8 
.Public Speaking 2, 3, 10 
.Soils 103, 141, 304, 342 



I can attend only the first half, June 11-July 20 

I can attend only the second half, July 23-Aug. 30. 

I can attend either half 

I will attend for twelve weeks 



-40- 

GENERAL COURSES 

General Agriculture 

Domestic Science for rural and grade teachers 

Domestic Science for Homemakers 

Manual Training 

Education (Didactics) 1, 2, 3 

Civics, Economics, Physics, Algebra 

Check below if you want the above work for the following reason: 
12 weeks work for grades in the new subjects (Agriculture, Do- 



mestic Science and Manual Training) 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Are you a graduate of an accredited High School? *& 

Do you want copy of Rural Life Conference Circular? " 

Do you want camping space (men and families only) ? 5 

Is this card to be taken as request for advanced registration or simply t»c 

for information? o 

ed 
Shall we reserve room for you? *» 

Name — - 

Address (city) 

County 

State 

The following will be interested in receiving information about the 
Summer Session: 

Name Address 



"(lite Jflarrn (Urcefc 

We Relieve that soil likes to eat, as well as 
its owner, and ought, therefore, to he liberalhj led. 

We helieve in the large crops which leave 
the land hetter than thevj found it - making the 
farmer and the farm hoth glad at once. 

We helieve in going to the .bottom of things 
and, therefore, in deep ploughing and enough of 
it. All the hetter with a suhsoil plough. 

We helieve that evenj farm should own a 
a good farmer. 

We helieve that the best fertilizer for amj 
soil is a spirit of industry, enterprize, and intelli- 
gence. Without this, lime and gvjpsum, bones and 
green manure, marl and guano will be of little 
use. 

We believe in good fences, good barns, 
good farmhouses, good stock, good orchards, and 
children enough to gather the fruit. 

We believe in a clean kitchen, a neat wife 
in it, a spinningwheel, a clean cupboard, a clean 
dairu, and a clean conscience. 

We firmhj disbelieve in farmers that will 
not improve, in farms that grow poorer evervj 
vjear, in starving cattle, in farmers' hous turning 
into clerks and merchants, in farmers' daughters 
unwilling to work, and in all farmers ashamed of 
their vocations or who drink whiskeu until hon- 
est people are ashamed of them. 

HENRY WARD BEECHER 



THE COLLEGE 



The Iowa State College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts conducts work in five major lines: 



AGRICULTURE 
ENGINEERING 
HOME ECONOMICS 
INDUSTRIAL SCIENCE 
VETERINARY MEDICINE 



The Graduate Division conducts advanced re- 
search and instruction in all these five lines. 

Four-year, five-year, and six-year collegiate 
courses are offered in different divisions of the Col- 
lege. Non-collegiate courses are offered in agricul- 
ture, engineering, and home economics. Summer 
Sessions include graduate, collegiate, and non-col- 
legiate work. Short courses are offered in the Winter. 

Extension courses are conducted ] at] various 
points throughout the state. 

Research work is conducted in the Agricultural 
and Engineering Experiment Stations and in J the 
Veterinary Research Laboratory. 

Special announcements of the different branch- 
es"of the work are supplied, free of charge, on ap- 
plication. The general college catalogue will be 
sent on request. 

Address 

HERMAN KNAPP 

Ames, Iowa Registrar 



ummer Session 

Iowa State College 



Ames-1918 







COURSES OFFERED IN 1918 



1. For High School Teachers, Superintendents, and College 
Students the following college credit courses: 

Agriculture — (32 regular courses) 

Agricultural Engineering 7 

Animal Husbandry 5 

Dairying 2 

Farm Crops 3 

Farm Management 1 

Forestry 5 

Horticulture 3 

Poultry .'. 2 

Soils 4 

Agricultural Education 10 

Agricultural Journalism 2 

Bacteriology 4 

Botany 3 

Chemistry 8 

Economic Science 3 

English and Literature 6 

History 2 

Home Economics 18 

Mathematics 5 

Mechanical Engineering 12 

Physical Culture (For Women) 2 

Physical Training (For Men) 1 

Physics ■:.' 3 

Psychology 3 

Public Speaking 3 

General courses in agriculture, manual training and home eco- 
nomics adapted for high school teachers. 

2. For Rural and Grade Teachers. Instruction in the in- 
dustria] subjects, — agriculture, home economics, manual train- 
ing,- — and didactics. Enough work is provided in these subjects 
to occupy the full time of the student. First half only. 

3. Graduate and Research work. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

AND MECHANIC ARTS 



VOL. XVI. DECEMBER 19, 1917 NO. 29 

Eighth Annual 

Summer Session 

General Announcement 



1918 



IS. 



Ames, Iowa 

Published Tri-monthly by the Iowa State College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at 
Ames la,. October 26, 1905, under the Act of Congress of July 16, 1904, 



1918 SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR 

Up to June 1 — Advanced Registration. 

June 1, Saturday — Registration, 8:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m. 

June 3, Monday — 8:00 a. m., Registration. 1:00 p. m., Work begins 
on regular schedule. 

June 4, Tuesday, 5:10 p. m. — General Summer Session Convocation, 
Agricultural Hall. 

June 8, Saturday — Regular work in a. m. (To make up work missed 
Monday a. m., June 4.) 

June 11-12 — Special Lectures by Dr. David E. Snedden. 

June 17-18 — Special Lectures by Supt. M. G. Clark. 

June 18, Tuesday. 8:00 a. m. — Beginning of study work for rural min- 
isters and leaders. Continue two weeks. 

June 26, Wednesday, 9:00 a. m. — Opening of Rural Lie Conference. 
Closes Friday, June 28, 4:00. 

June 26, 27, 28, Wednesday, Thursdav and Friday — Examination for 
county uniform certificates. 

June 28, Friday — Elsie Herndon Kearns Co. 

July 4, Thursday — National Holiday. 

July 12, Friday, 4:00 p. m. — Close of first half of Summer Session. 



Juiv 15, Mondav 8:00 a. m. — Beginning of second half of Summer Ses- 
sion. Kegular work each Saturday during second half. 

July 24, 25 26, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday — Examination fo: 
county uniform certificate. 

August 22, Thursday, 12:00 m. — Close of Summer Session. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Summer Session work was offered by the Iowa State College for the 
first time in 1911. In that summer a short course extending over two 
weeks was attended by about fifty superintendents and high school 
teachers of the state. Since that time the interest in agriculture and 
industrial subjects has increased tremendously, not only in this state, 
but throughout the United States. At the present time 22 states re- 
quire the teaching of agriculture in the public schools, and in many 
more of the states agriculture is taught, especially in the high schools. 
In 1912 the Summer Session was extended to isix weeks, and had a 
total enrollment of 128 students. The third Summer Session, 1913, en- 
rolled 225 students. These students came from 63 counties of the 
state and 10 states of the Union. 

The Summer Session in 1914 had a total attendance of 618. The 
students represented 96 counties in the state, 15 states and 6 foreign 
countries. Eighty-eight per cent of them were teachers in the public 
schools and not in attendance during the regular college year. 

During the last two summers, the enrollment has continued to in- 
crease and this hearty response on the part of teachers shows clearly 
the wisdom of the legislature in passing the law requiring the teach- 
ing of the industrial subjects in the public schools. Properly organized 
and in the hands of qualified teachers, agriculture, home economics 
and manual training adapt themselves admirably as public school sub- 
jects. The subject matter is interesting, worth while, and has a use- 
ful outcome. 

General Statement. The college always has recognized its special 
responsibility in the training of high school and college teachers of 
agriculture, manual training, home economics, and the application of 
science to these vocational subjects. 

Teachers in service can be helped best through the Summer Session, 
and in a large measure they have a right to the advantages of the 
unusual equipment of the Iowa State College. This is especially true 
since the legislation requiring the teaching of the industrial subjects 
in the public schools. 

In the forthcoming Summer Session the excellent facilities of the 
college, "s usual, will be available to the fullest extent to those who 
wish to enroll as students. 

The establishment of vocational education on a large scale through 
the Smith-Hughes bill places an additional responsibility upon 
the Iowa State College, and this responsibility it will endeavor to 
meet fully. 

Who May Properly Attend. On account of the easy conditions of 
entrance, many receive benefit from the Summer Session who do not 
attend during the regular year. The following should be particularly 
interested in the Summer Session: 

1. ALL TEACHERS, or persons expecting to teach next year, may 
use the Summer Session to secure work in the industrial subjects as 
required by the recent legislation. Teachers in the elementary schools 
will find profitable work in the Rural and Grade Teachers' Course. 
High school teachers may secure strong work along particular lines as 
listed under college credit courses. 

2. SUPERINTENDENTS, PRINCIPALS AND SUPERVISORS. The 
large number of superintendents and principals who have been enrolled 



in the Summer Session in the past indicates clearly that it is serving 
them to good advantage, and meeting a special need which they feel 
for getting acquainted with the newer subjects of manual training and 
agriculture, together with courses in agricultural education. An exam- 
ination of the Iowa Directory indicates that agriculture is taught in 
the high schools of the state by the superintendents more often than 
by any other single group. Beginning and advanced courses are of- 
fered in the present session in soils, farm crops, animal husbandry, 
dairying, agricultural engineering, horticulture, and in the related sub- 
jects of rural sociology, agricultural economics, agricultural education, 
botany, bacteriology, etc. The Summer Session gives such superintend- 
ents and principals an opportunity to secure work of a high character 
under regular college instruction and under favorable conditions. 

3. COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS. Six weeks at the Iowa State 
College would be unusually helpful in view of the rapid development 
of the vocational ajnd industrial subjects in the schools. 

4. HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES will find an opportunity to start 
the college course. High school graduates who think of entering the 
Iowa State College in the fall of 1918 may take advantage of the Sum- 
mer Session to become acquainted with college methods and to secure 
work towards graduation. Increasing numbers are taking advantage 
of the Summer Session for this purpose. 

5. REGULAR STUDENTS IN THE IOWA STATE COLLEGE may 
make up back work, shorten their course by doing advanced work, or 
increase their electives. 

6. STUDENTS in other colleges who are interested in the indus- 
trial wo>rk and related lines will find other colleges willing to substi- 
tute credits made at this institution. 

7. FORMER GRADUATES may complete the necessary work in 
psychology and agricultural education in order to secure the first 
grade state certificate. 

8. ANY MATURE INDIVIDUAL who gives evidence of ability to 
carry the work with profit will be admitted without examination, but 
such individual must satisfy the department concerned as to his or 
her ability to carry the work. 

9. RURAL AND VILLAGE MINISTERS will find especially valu- 
able help in the Rural Life Conference. Bankers, farmers, rural lead- 
ers, mothers and daughters will find a welcome, an atmosphere of 
culture and inspiration, and practical help for their work. 

10. WOMEN of maturity will find particular help in the home- 
makers' courses offered during the Summer Session. These courses 
have proved popular and have attracted women not only from all parts 
of Iowa, but from all parts of the nation. 

Conditions of Admission. AH students who can profit by the instruc- 
tion offered will be admitted without examination, admission to a par- 
ticular course being satisfactory to the professor in charge. It is pre- 
sumed that all applying for admission have a serious purpose, and are 
interested in the industrial work. College credit wall be granted, how- 
ever, only to those who meet standard entrance requirements. 

Ctudies and Credits. Nearly one hundred college credit studies are 
offered. Thirty-two of these are in agriculture. An average student 
should be able to make six hours credit during a single half of the 
Summer Session. All courses ottered are completed during a single 
half of the Summer Session by increasing the number of recitations 
per week. There are QO split courses. A student desiring to carry 
more than six (or six and a fraction) hours of college credit work will 
be required to make application for permission to take extra work, ap- 



plication being countersigned by the instructors involved. The com- 
mittee on extra work will meet Saturday evening, June 1. 

Late Entrance. Because of the rapidity with which the work moves 
in a short session, students should enter in time to attend the first 
session of all classes. Work begins at 1:00 P. M. on Monday, June 3. 
Courses in the new industrial subjects have laboratory periods, and 
students should therefore plan to be present for the first meeting of 
the class. 

General Courses. In the general courses, students will be given more 
freedom as to the number of hours to be carried. The schedule, how- 
ever, should be reasonable. Experience proves that a schedule that is 
too heavy is unsatisfactory both to the student and to the instructors. 

Special Work. Students wishing to do advanced or other special 
work not announced in this bulletin should communicate at an early 
date with the Director of the Summer Session, or with the professor 
in whose department they wish to work. Consideration may be given 
to a sufficient number of requests. 

Meeting Residence Requirements for a Degree Through Summer 
Session Work. Because of the largely increased attendance at the 
Summer Session, provision has been made for the satisfying of resi- 
dence requirements for a degree on the basis of four Summer Sessions 
of six weeks each. The amount of work required for the degree will 
need to be supplemented by work in absence, or by correspondence. 

Graduate and Research Work which will apply on the 'higher de- 
grees conferred by this institution will again be offered in certain de- 
partments during the Summer Session, if there is sufficient demand for 
it. In the recent Summer Sessions there have been a goodly number 
of graduate students from this and other institutions, who have 
availed themselves of this opportunity for completing work towards 
the Master's or Doctor's degree. For further details regarding the 
opportunities for advanced work, the requirements for degrees, and 
for copies of the Graduate Catalog, address the Dean of the Graduate 
Division. 

Fees. The single Summer Session fee of $5.00 for each half of six 
weeks, covers work in all courses! with the exception of the Music De- 
partment. The fee for less than the full time is $1.00 a week, with 
$2.00 as a minimum; or $1.00 per credit hour for college credit work, 
with $2.00 as a minimum. Laboratory fees are indicated in connection 
with the descriptions of the courses. In the Rural and Grade Teach- 
ers' Course, there are no Incidental fees. No fee is charged for at- 
tendance at the Rural Life Conference. 

Room and Board. Room and board is available in private homes and 
at the college dormitories at prices which are customary throughout 
Iowa. The cafe in Alumni Hall will be open during the entire Sum- 
mer Session, and will be managed on the cafeteria plan. 

Women will arrange for rooms through cgular college commit- 

tee of which the Dean of Women is chairman. The college dormitories 
will be open for women students for board and room. After the 
dormitories are filled, the Dean of Women will assign women to se- 
lected houses about the campus, where the regular college rules will 
apply. In the dormitories and private homes alike, mattresses only 
are furnished for the cots, so that students should bring a pillow, 
sheets, pillow cases and an extra blanket. 

Rooms for men will be available in private homes and rooming 
houses about the campus. Rooming arrangements for men will be in 
charge of the Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

Expenses. Expenses will vary with the individual. For six weeks 
the expenses need not exceed $45 or $50, in addition to car fare. This 



makes provision for tuition, room and board for six weeks, books and 
laundry, and other incidentals. 

Certificates. Students satisfactorily completing any of the general 
courses offered in the Summer Session will, upon request, be given a 
certificate showing attendance and grades. 

The State Board of Educational Examiners will grant five-year, 
first-grade certificates to graduates of the Iowa State College or other 
approved colleges who have completed (a) six semester-hours of psy- 
chology, and (b) fourteen hours of education. The courses offered in 
the Summer Session enable students to meet these requirements. 

Teachers' Examination. The State Teachers' examination for June 
and July will be held at the college during the Summer Session for the 
convenience of the teachers in attendance. One expecting to take an ex- 
amination at the college should bring with him a statement from the 
county superintendent, together with county superintendent's receipt 
showing payment of fee, which will admit to the examination. Where 
such fee has not been previously paid it will be collected and for- 
warded to the county superintendent. 

The Appointment Committee. In order to better serve the schools 
of the state, the faculty has provided a regular Appointment Commit- 
tee, the tduties of which are to assist the students of the College who 
desire to enter educational work in finding positions for which they 
are best fitted, and to aid school officials in finding the teachers, prin- 
cipals, supervisors and superintendents best prepared for the positions 
to be filled. Students of the Summer Session, who intend to teach or 
wish to better their -positions, may register with this committee. 
Blanks which are provided for that purpose may be secured by calling 
at the office of the Director of the Summer Session, Room 318, Agri- 
cultural Hall. No fee is charged for the services of this committee. 

Chapel. Chapel services are held once each week at a convenient 
hour and all students are expected to attend. This is more or less in 
the nature of a convocation as well as a chapel service, and furnishes 
opportunity for announcements or for brief remarks upon subjects of 
immediate interest. 

Each Sunday evening, vesper services are held from 6:15 to 6:45 at 
the campanile when the weather is favorable. In case of inclement 
weather, the meeting is held in Agricultural Assembly. 

Students' Mail. Students will avoid inconvenience by having their 
mail addressed, temporarily at least, to Station A, Ames, Iowa. This 
postoffice is located upon the College campus, and mall may be called 
for conveniently. 

Summer Employment. Students coming for the short Summer Ses- 
sion are not advised to seek employment, but to give their full time 
to school work. This is particularly urged in the case of teachers de- 
siring to have the grades in agricluture, home economics and manual 
training transferred ' ' the certificate. 

There are usually some ^.mmer calls for help. Students may learn 
of these calls through the Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

Recreation. While the primary object of the Summer Session is 
work and study, yet these will be facilitated by a sufficient amount of 
recreation. Students are urged to effect organizations and to arrange 
for tournaments in tennis, baseball, track, or indoor work. The Com- 
mittee en Games and Recreation will encourage and help in organizing 
tie- details of this work. Play hour, 7 to 9 Friday evenings; educa- 
tional moving pictures, 8:00 o'clock Saturday evenings. 

Tenting Privilege. The privilege of tenting in the north woods will 
be continued this summer. There is no charge for tenting space, but 
the space is limited. It will be well to arrange in advance for the 



privilege. Tents may be brought along or rented of tenting com- 
panies. One company in Des Moines makes a price of $5 for six 
weeks for a 10 foot by 12 foot tent. 

Special Features. One feature of the Summer Session which is par- 
ticularly worth while is the opportunity to hear educators of national 
reputation. The policy of selecting a limited number of men whose 
addresses no one can afford to miss will be continued this year. 
These lectures for the unost part are scheduled for the evening; occa- 
sionally, however, at 5:00 o'clock. The following can be announced at 
the present time: 

Dr. David D. Snedden, Teachers College, Columbia University, New 
York City. 

Dr. Charles F. Fordyce, Dean of the College of Education, University 
of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebr. 

M. G. Clark, Superintendent of Schools, Sioux City, Iowa. 

Shakespearean Festival. The Elsie Herndon Kearns Co. will again be 
present during the Summer Session, giving matinee and evening per- 
forfances on the college campus. Details of the program will be an- 
nounced later. This is an opportunity which Summer Session students 
greatly appreciate. 

The Model School. The popular two-room, consolidated Model 
School will be continued in charge of competent critic teachers. Regu- 
lar work in observation and methods will be offered for students in the 
general courses, and the work of the model school will be used in the 
regular college courses in agricultural education. Courses offered in 
Agricultural Education will include Principles and Methods of Educa- 
tion, Rural Education, Secondary Education, and School Administra- 
ton. This will enable us to serve directly the rural teacher, the 
grade teacher, the agricultural high school teacher, and the school ad- 
ministrator. The Model School provides the laboratory opportunity 
of demonstrating the best in educational methods. 

Boys' and Girls' Club Work. The growing interest in boys' and girls' 
club work and its rapid development throughout the state has led to an 
arrangement by which Professor E. C. Bishop, State Club Leader, and 
his assistants, will give special lectures and demonstrations during the 
Summer Session. The work given will enable students to get a suffi- 
cient understanding to organize and carry forward club work in their 
respective communities. 

Library. The library of the Iowa State College is well selected and 
it is so managed as to make it serviceable to all students during the 
Summer Session. 

Equipment. The equipment of the Iowa State College for work in 
agriculture, home economics, manual training and related subjects is in 
keeping with the wealth and resources of the state. In many respects, 
the Summer Session is the best season of the year for studying agri- 
culture, and the regular college instructors in charge of the work use 
freely the resources of the college and the experiment station. 

Location. Ames is almost at the geographical center of the state of 
Iowa, on the main line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad. It is 
about thirty-five miles north of Des Moines, with which it is connected 
by a branch line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad and by the 
Fort Dodge, Des Moines and Southern (interurban) running from Fort 
Dodge and Rockwell City to Des Moines. A branch of the Chicago & 
Northwestern from Ames penetrates the northern part of the state. 
Ames is proverbially a clean town, saloons and billiard halls being un- 
heard of. 

Students should plan to arrive on Saturday or Monday. In case it is 
absolutely necessary to arrive on Sunday, advanced notice should b<* 



8 

given, with the request that rooms be arranged for, at least temporari- 
ly. In case of arrival on Sunday, without advanced notice, phone 652, 
the residence phone of the Director of the Summer Session. 

Rural Life Conference. The Rural Life Conference will open on 
Tuesday, June 18th, and close Friday evening, June 28th. The last three 
•days will be in the form of a convention and will be of special interest 
to rural ministers and to residents and teachers of rural communities. 

In the past, this conference has been most helpful to Iowa and neigh- 
boring states in stimulating and developing rural leadership. Speakers 
of note from state and nation will appear before the conference. 

The lectures in the Rural Life Conference are free to Summer Ses- 
sion students, as well as members of the Conference. For special bul- 
letin giving detailed program of the Conference, write Dean Chas. F. 
Curtiss, Chairman of the Rural Life Conference Committee, or the 
Director of the Summer Session. 

LEGAL PROVISIONS OF INTEREST TO TEACHERS 
A large part of the work offered in the Summer Session is arranged 
in direct response to recent legislation. Work is therefore arranged to 
meet legal requirements. The laws of the state encouraging work in 
agriculture, home economics and manual training are in common with 
similar laws throughout the entire United States. The movement for 
the industrial work in the schools is not local nor is it transitory. It is 
gathering force each year. It is simply the recognition of the fact that 
education to be effective must be connected up directly with the work 
and dominant interests of the people. The government census shows 
that 68% of the people of Iowa are rural and that 49.2% are actually 
living upon farms. This makes agriculture the one dominant occupa- 
tion of the state. For woimen, of course, home economics is the one 
great interest, but women living on the farm are almost equally inter- 
ested in farm operations. While Iowa is not a large manufacturing 
state at present, the output of its factories is increasing steadily each 
year. Industry in one form or another takes most of the time of every 
one and there is no reason why our education should not connect up 
more and more with industry which shall put joy and satisfaction as 
well as scientific insight into all industrial and manual occupations. 

Any county superintendent can instruct teachers as to the legal re- 
quirements or the requirements of the State Educational Board of Ex- 
aminers with reference to the new subjects. Rural teachers taking- 
work in agriculture, home economics or manual training may have the 
grades in these subjects transferred direct to the certificate on com- 
pletion of twelve weeks of work, but the work for rural and grade 
teachers this year does not lead to a certificate for twelve weeks of 
normal training. Agriculture, home economics and manual training 
are the subjects in which the Iowa State College of all institutions is 
prepared to help teachers. 






OFFICERS AND FACULTY 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 



D. D. Murphy, President, Elkader. 

W. C. Stuckslager, Lisbon. 

Geo. T. Baker, Davenport. 

Paul E. Stillman, Jefferson. 

Frank P. Jones, Villisca. 

P. K. Holbrook, Onawa. 

Chas. R. Birenton, Dallas Center. 

Edw. P. Schoentgen, Council Bluffs. 

H. M. Eicher, Washington. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

W. R. Boyd, Chairman, Cedar Rapids. 

Thomas Lambert, Sabula. 

W. H. Gemmill, Secretary, Des Moines. 

AUDITOR AND INSPECTOR 

Jackson W. Bowdish, Auditor and Accountant, Des Moines. 
John E. Foster, Inspector, Des Moines. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

Raymond A. Pearson, President (on leave of absence). 

E. W. Stanton, Acting President, Central Building. 

G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session, Agricultural Hall. 

Herman Knapp, Treasurer and Registrar, Central Building. 

SUMMER SESSION COUNCIL 

E. W. Stanton, Acting President. 
C. F. Curtiss, Dean of Agriculture. 
S. W. Beyer, Dean of Engineering. 

R. E. Buchanan, Dean of Industrial Science. 
Catherine J. MacKay, Dean of Home Economics. 
G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session. 

PROFESSORS 

F. W. Beckman Agricultural Journalism 
H. A. Bittenbender Poultry Husbandry 
Robert Earle Buchanan Bacteriology 

Orange Howard Cessna Psychology 

W. F. Coover Chemistry 

Gilmour Beyers MacDonald Forestry 

Ethelwyn Miller Home Economics 

H. B. Munger Farm Management 

A. B. Noble English 

Louis Herman Pammel Botany 

William Henry Stevenson Soils 

M. G. Thornburg Animal Husbandry 

G. M. Wilson Agricultural Education 



10 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 



Archibald A. Bailey 
Iva Brandt 
Florence Bussey 
H. L. Eichling 
Myrtle Ferguson 

E. F. Ferrin 
Genevieve Fisher 
C. C. Fowler 
Winifred Gettemy 
L. S. Gillette 

F. M. Harrington 
William Ray Heckler 
Clyde McKee 

John Nathan Martin 
C. W. Mayser 

G. C. Morbeek 
J. O. Rankin 
R. R. Renshaw 
A. W. Rudnick 

Lou's Bernard Schmidt 

W. E. Sealock 

P. S. Shearer 

C. K. Shedd 

R. E. Smith 

Harold Stiles 

L. A. Test 

Winifred Tilden 

George H. Von Tungeln 

T. F. Vance 

Edna Walls 

John Anderson Wilkinson 



Music 

Home Economics 

Home Economics 

General Agriculture 

Home Economics 

Animal Husbandry 

Home Economics 

Chemistry 

Home Economics 

Animal Husbandry 

Horticulture 

Farm Crops 

Farm Crops 

Botany 

Physical Training 

Forestry 

Economic Science 

Chemistry 

Dairy 

History 

Agricultural Education 

Animal Husbandry 

Agricultural Engineering 

Soils 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Physical Culture 

Economic Science 

Psychology 

Home Economics 

Chemisty 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 



Chas. H. Dorchester 
E. E. Eastman 
M. D. Helser 
John Hug 
Max Levine 
N. A. Merriam 
H. R. O'Brien 
H. J. Plagge 
Raymond Rogers 
E. H. Rucker 
T. R. Truax 
H. H. Walter 



Farm Crops 

Soils 

Animal Husbandry 

Mechanical Engineering 

Bacteriology 

Physical Training 

Agricultural Journalism 

Physics 

Physical Training 

Animal Husbandry 

Forestry 

Physical Training 



INSTRUCTORS 



Bertha Bennett 
J. Lawrence Eason 
Fae Far num. 
Roy J. Holmes 
Blanche Ingersoll 
Delta M. Kauffman 
Rosamond Kedzie 
Edith Palmer 



Physical Culture 

English 

Mathematics 

English 

Home Economics 

Public Speaking 

Home Economics 

Home Economics 



11 

Jean Peterson Physical Culture 

Mabel Russell Home Economics 

Mary Schwartz Music 

D. L. Scoles Chemistry 
Helen F. Smith Mathematics 
Libbie A. Smith Home Economics 

E. M. Spangler Mechanical Engineering 
A. Helen Tappan Mathematics 

Cecile Van Steenberg Home Economics 

LIBRARY 

Vera M. Dixon Assistant Librarian 

Amy Winslow Reference Librarian 

Gladys Rush Head of Readers' Dep't. 

LABORATORY ASSISTANTS 

F. E. Brown Chemistry 
F. F. Sherwood Chemistry 

SPECIALS 

W. H. Bender Agricultural Education 

Director of Vocational Education for the State of Iowa 
Anna L. Burdick Agricultural Education 

Director Vocational Guidance, Des Moines City Schools 
Gertrude Dennison Grade Critic Teacher 

Grade Supervisor, Sioux City Schools 
Bertha C. Stiles Primary Critic Teacher 

Primary Supervisor, Cedar Falls, Iowa 

Note — The war has made unusual demands upon the faculty of the 
Iowa State College. If any of those listed above are called into 
the national service before the opening of the Summer Session, 
suitable substitutions will be made. 



COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 



There are many who wish to take some of the regular college courses 
either because of the intrinsic value of the work to them in a prac- 
tical way or as a part of a regular college course to be completed later. 

The courses described below are the same as those offered during 
the college year and will be taught by the regular college faculty. The 
descriptions are quoted from the regular college catalog. 

Other courses may be offered when requested by a sufficient num- 
ber of students. 

As the Summer Session is approximately one-third the length of a 
college semester, the number of hours per week devoted to a course in 
the Summer session will be three times what is shown in the descrip- 
tions below. Six hours per week constitutes full work in these college 
courses. There is little doubt but that the numbers wanting each 
course will justify offering it. 

A resolution adopted by the Iowa Council of Education indicated 
about thirty-two hours of technical agriculture of a college grade as 
the minimum for a regular teacher of agriculture in the high school. 
This amount of work will easily be secured in successive Summer Ses- 
sions. The work in agriculture offered during the summer of 1918 in- 
cludes additional courses to meet further demands for agriculture. The 
prospective student who is looking forward to several Summer Ses- 
sions in succession is advised to plan his work so as to cover the field 
in a reasonable manner and meet the minimum requirements as sug- 
gested by the Iowa Council of Education. 

The regular amount of work for a single Summer Session will enable 
one to secure twelve hours of agriculture and this will meet require- 
ments in some schools. For instance, during the first half, one could 
secure work as follows: A. H. 1, 2 hrs; F. C. 1 or Hort. 3, 2% hrs.; 
Dairy 10 or Hort. 408, 2 hrs.; total 6% hrs. This is merely illustrative. 
Any other combination of animal husbandry, agricultural engineering, 
dairy, farm crops, farm management, poultry, horticulture, or soils, 
would be acceptable and all of this is the right type of agricultural 
work for the prospective high school teacher. The reasonably small 
units of specialized work are considered much more desirable than 
courses in general agriculture. The schedule is so arranged as to avoid 
conflict and enable the student to carry the full amount of agriculture 
during the first and second halves of the summer school. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

1. Methods of Teaching Vocational Subjects. The technique of the 
recitation; types of lessons and the standards for judging them; the 
selection and organization of subject matter; the bases for readjusting 
the curriculum to make room for new types of school work; efficiency 
in the management of the study period. 

Recitations 2; credit 2. 

2. Principles of Vocational Education. The biological, sociological 
and psychological bases of education; aims and values in the curricu- 
lum, with particular reference to industrial and vocational subjects. 

Recitations 2; credit 2. 

Zh. The Present Day High School. Problems, organization, manage- 
ment, and methods; criteria for the selection of subject matter. 
Recitations 2; credit 2. 



13 

5a. History of Vocational and Industrial Education. The history of 
education with reference to its bearing upon the solution of present 
educational problems, especially problems of industrial and vocational 
education. Chief emphasis upon the modern movement. 

Recitations 2; credit 2. 

7. Vocational Education. Development and present best practice 
with reference to vocational education, pre-vocational education, and 
vocational guidance. 

Recitations 2; credit 2. 

8. Rural Education. The study of rural education with particular 
reference to the interests of the county superintendent, the normal 
training teacher and the superintendent or teacher in the consolidated 
or village school. 

Recitations 2; credit 2. 

10. School Administration and Supervision. Principles of curricula 
making, with emphasis on industrial and vocational values. 

Recitations 2; credit 2. 

21a. Training in Teaching Home Economics. This course is a 
Summer Session adaptation of the regular course in special methods 
and practice teaching. It is planned for teachers of home economics in 
grades and high schools. It includes a study of the choice of suitable 
subject matter, method of presentation, equipment, illustrative mate- 
rial and a comparison of the more recent text books designed for grade 
and high school classes. Special emphasis will be placed upon the 
planning of work in home economics for vocational schools in which 
foods may be prepared in large quantities in connection with the 
school lunch room, or where courses in dressmaking and millinery lead 
directly to trade work. 

Recitation 2; credit 2. 

31a. Training in Teaching Agriculture. Courses of study; lesson 
plans; observation and practice teaching under supervision. Teachers 
of vocational agriculture or normal training agriculture who register 
for this course will be given special problems relating to their work. 

Recitation 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 3. 

31b. Training in Teaching Agriculture. Continuation of 31a. 

Recitation 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 3. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

1. Shop Work. Blacksmithing, forging and welding of iron and 
steel; making and tempering hand-tools. Work designed to be espe- 
cially helpful in the repair and operation of machinery. 

Lab. 1, 3 hr; credit 1; fee $2.50. 

5. Farm Machinery and Farm Motors. Mechanics and materials; 
the measurement and transmission of power; development, construc- 
tion, functions and methods of operating, adjusting and repairing farm 
machinery and farm motors ; the principles of draft and the production 
of power. Laboratory work is devoted to the study of construction, 
operation, adjustment, and testing of machines discussed in the class 
room. 

Pre-requisite Phys. 205; recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee 
$2.00. 

13. Gas and Oil Engines. Practical operation and management of 
the internal combustion engine. The development, the existing types, 
the theory and practice of operation; the adjustment, the repair, and 
the utility of gas, gasoline, oil and alcohol engines. Laboratory work 
consists of tests and exercises to familiarize the student with the prac- 
tical care and management of this type of motor. 



14 



Recitation 1; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $2.50. 

19. Rural Sanitary Equipment. A brief study of lighting, heating 
and ventilation systems for farm, buildings; sanitary construction, 
plumbing, systems of water supply and sewage disposal. A. E. 36 may 
accompany this as a laboratory. 

Recitation 1; credit 1. 

21. Cement Construction. The use of cement in farm building con- 
struction. Cement testing study mixtures; construction of forms, rein- 
forcement. Also other building materials. 

Recitation and lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 1; fee $2.00. 

30. Farm Structures. The class work of 6. Sketches rather than 
finished drawings. 

Pre-requisite 4; recitation 1; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 1%. 

36. Rural Sanitary Equipment Laboratory. To accompany or fol- 
low A. E. 19. For agricultural students. 

Lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit %; fee $1.50. 

AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISM 

8. Beginning Technical Journalism. The fundamentals of journal- 
istic writing. Lectures on news, news values and news styles, with 
practice in news gathering and writing, and the application of the prin- 
ciples involved to technical and informational writing. 

Pre-requisites, English 18 and 19 or Eng. 23 and 24; recitations 2; 
credit 2. 

9. Agricultural Journalism Practice. Devoted primarily to practice 
writing, following up the work in 8. Readiness in writing and the de- 
veloping of originality and individuality are emphasized. Special at- 




Farm Machinery Laboratory 



15 

tention is given to the longer agricultural and magazine articles. 
Pre-requisite 8; recitations 2; credit 2. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

1. Types and Market Classes of Beef Cattle and Sheep. Judging; 
study of carcasses, live stock markets, and the market classification 
of live stock. 

Recitation 1; lab. 3 far.; credit 2; fee $1.50. 

2. Type and Market Classes of Dairy Cattle, Horses and Swine. 
Judging; study of carcasses, live stock markets, and market classifi- 
cation of live stock. 

Recitation 1; lab. 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.50. 

3. Breed Studies of Beef Cattle and Sheep. Judging types and rep- 
resentatives of different breeds according to their official standard; 
study of the origin, history, characteristics and adaptability of the 
breeds. 

Pre-requisite 1; recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3V 3 ; fee $2.00. 

4. Breed Studies of Dairy Cattle, Horses and Swine. Judging types 
and representatives of different breeds according to their official 
standards; study of the origin, history, characteristics and adaptabil- 
ity of the breeds. 

Pre-requisite 2; recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3V3; fee $2.00. 

20. Animal Feeding. Composition and digestibility of feeding stuifs; 
the preparation of coarse fodders; the grinding, steaming and cooking 
of feeding stuffs; feeding standards and calculation of rations; feed- 
ing for meat, milk, wool, growth and work. 

Pre-requisites, Chem. 151, 351 or 408; recitations 2; credit 2. 

42. General Poultry Husbandry. Various kinds of poultry products 
ordinarily produced for sale, with reference to their relative import- 
ance and opportunities for their production; characteristics of import- 
ant classes and breeds of poultry; judging, breeding, housing and mar- 
keting. 

Recitations iy 2 ; lab. 1, iy 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $2.00. 

43. General Poultry Husbandry. Continues the work in 42 and in- 
cludes feeding, incubation, brooding, diseases and sanitation. 

Pre-requisite 42; recitations 1V 2 ; lab. 1, iy z hr.; credit 2; fee $2.00 

BACTERIOLOGY 

1. General Bacteriology. Morphology, classification, physiology and 
cultivation of bacteria; relation of bacteria to health of man and 
animals, to infection, contagion, immunity, and to other scientific and 
agricultural problems. Laboratory work on methods of cultivating bac- 
teria and the study of bacterial functions and activities, bacterial con- 
tent of water and food, with interpretation of results reached. 

Pre-requisite, Organic Chemistry; recitations 2; lab. 3, 2 hr. ; credit 
4; fee $5.00. 

15. General Bacteriology, Animal Husbandry. A discussion of gen- 
eral bacteriology, followed by study of the relationship of bacteria to 
agriculture with particular reference to the live stock industry. 

Pre-requisite, Organic Chemistry; recitations 2; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 
3y 3 ; fee $4.00. 

18. Bacteriology and Fermentations. Bacteria in their relation to 
the home, including a brief consideration of the pathogenic forms and 
the bacteria, yeasts and molds in their zymotic activities. 

Pre-requisite, Organic Chemistry; recitations 2; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 
3V 3 ; fee $5.00. 



16 







Microscopic Work Is a Feature of Most Botany Courses. 



30. Research in General Systematic Bacteriology. For graduate 
students. Professor Buchanan. 

Pre-requisite 1 and 5 or equivalent; fee $5.00. 

BOTANY 

161. Plant Morphology. First part: structures of the higher plants; 
purpose, to support the work in home economics and agriculture. Sec- 
ond part: different plant groups; purpose, to make clear plant evolu- 
tion, and to lay a basis for the study of bacteriology and plant path- 
ology. 

Recitation 1; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 1%; fee $2.00. 

470. Systematic Spermatophytes. Flowering plants; historical sur- 
vey of various systems of classification; study of groups by means of 
some representatives. 

Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $3.00. 

560. Botany of Weeds. Injury of weeds to farm, garden and horti- 
cultural crops; origin and distribution of weeds. 

Recitation 1; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 1%; fee $3.00. 

CHEMISTRY 

103. General Chemistry. For students who have not had high 
school chemistry. Principles and the non-metallic elements. 

Lectures 2; recitation 1; lab. 1 or 2, 3 hr. or 3, 2 hr.; credit 4 or 5; 
deposit,, $10.00. 

104. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. Continuation of 
L03. The metallic elements, their separation and identification. 

Pre-requisite 351; lectures and recitations 2; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 
$10.00. 



351. Applied Organic Chemistry. Physical and chemical properutsa 
and methods of preparation of important classes of organic com- 
pounds; the composition of plant and animal bodies; the proximate 
principles of foods and the chemical changes which occur during di- 
gestion. 

Pre-requisite 108; lectures 3; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 3%; deposit $7.50. 

352. Agricultural Analysis. Principles of gravi-metric and volumet- 
ric analysis; the analysis of milk, grain, and mill feeds and fodders. 

Pre-requisite 351; lectures and recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 
3V 3 ; deposit $10.00. 

375. Applied Organic Chemistry. Consideration of organic chem- 
istry with special reference to Home Economics. Study, estimation and 
preparation of some of the more important compounds. Serves as a 
foundation for physiological chemistry. 

Pre-requisite 110; lectures 2; recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; c.edit 4V 3 ; 
deposit $10.00. 

376. Food Chemistry. Consideration of constituents entering into 
composition of foods with quantitative estimation. Methods of analysis 
of foods; milk, butter, oleomargarine, ice cream, cereal foods, detec- 
tion of coloring matter and food preservatives. 

Pre-requisite 375; lectures 2; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3y 3 ; deposit $10.00. 

403. Physiological Chemistry. Home Economics students. Chem- 
istry of the human body, its food, organic and inorganic and the 
changes which these undergo during the process of nutrition. 

Pre-requisite 376; recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit ZV 3 ; deposit 
$10.00. 

801. Research. Research work for graduate students is offered in 
the following subjects: 

a. Applied Inorganic Chemistry — Associate Professor Test and As- 
sistant Professor Brown. 

b. Analytical Chemistry — Associate Professor Wilkinson. 

c. Applied Physical Chemistry — Associate Professor Wilkinson. 

d. Applied Organic Chemistry — Associate Professor Renshaw. 

e. Organic Analysis or Food Analysis — Professor Coover and As- 
sistant Professor Buchanan. 

f. Agricultural Chemistry — Professor Coover. 

g. Physiological Chemistry and Nutrition — Associate Professor 
Fowler. 

DAIRY 

12. Farm Dairying. Secretion, composition, testing, separation and 
acidity of milk, preparation of starters, ripening of cream, and churn- 
ing and packing butter. 

Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $3.00. 

36. Domestic Dairying. Nutritive and economical value of milk; its 
dietetics and hygiene; market milk, infants' milk, invalids' milk, 
cream, ice cream, condensed milk, malted milk, dried milk, fermented 
milks (Kephir, Koumiss), buttermilk, butter and cheese. Demonstra- 
tions are given in types of butter and cheese, and in testing the purity 
of milk and butter. 

Pre-requisite Chem. 375; lectures and labs. 2; credit 2; fee $2.50. 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE 

110. Agricultural Economics. Historical and comparative agricul- 
tural systems, land tenure, size of farms, co-operation, taxation, prices, 
transportation, marketing, land credit, the relation of the state to 
agriculture. 

Recitations 3; credit 3. 



18 

424. Rural Sociology. A study of rural social life and means to its 
improvement; social forces and factors affecting the quantity and 
quality of the rural population, institutions and organizations; com- 
parison of the country with city as regards birth-rate, death-rate, long- 
evity, marriage, divorce, criminality, leadership, standards of morality, 
standards of living, thrift, public opinion, etc. 

Recitations 3; credit 3. 

ENGLISH 

10. Narration and Description. Expository and suggestive descrip- 
tion; better vocabulary through search for the specific word; simple 
and complex narrative with incidental description; plot and character- 
ization; securing interest, as well as clearness and good order; an- 
alysis of good models. Themes daily, to train the student to apply 
the principles studied. 

Recitations 3; credit 3; fee 25 cents. 

11. Exposition. Principles and methods of expository writing; log- 
ical basis in definition and division; different types of exposition, with 
study of models; careful attention to the construction of paragraphs 
and the making of plans and outlines ; a short theme almost daily, with 
longer ones occasionally, constant emphasis on the application of the 
principles studied. 

Recitations 3; credit 3; fee 25 cents. 

230. Literature of Modern Life. The major writers of the nineteenth 
century, with preliminary survey of the earlier periods; the "Victorian 
period with special attention to Browning, Carlyle, and one of the 
greater novelists. 

Recitations 2; credit 2. 

401. Shakespeare. The great dramas. 
Recitations 2; credit 2. 

412. Argumentation. The two methods, the inductive and the de- 
ductive, of drawing inferences and establishing truth; now to detect 
fallacies and how to guard against them; abstracting, collating, and 
classifying arguments on both sides of some live questions of present 
importance ; organizing a large mass of material and developing it into 
a logical brief; analysis of good models; writing forensics. 

Recitations 2; credit 2; fee 25 cents. 

417. The Short Story. The short story from the time of its develop- 
ment as a distinct literary form to the present time; the various types, 
with principal attention to the product of the last fifty years in France, 
England, and the United States. 

Recitations 2 ; credit 2 hours. 

FARM CROPS 

1. Corn Production. Structure and adaptation of the corn plant; 
methods of selecting, storing, testing, grading, planting, cultivating 
and harvesting. Cost of production, uses of the crop, commercial mar- 
keting insects and diseases. Field study of corn with reference to per 
cent stand and correlation of the parts of the stalk. Laboratory study 
of the structure of the stalk, ear, and kernel. Scoring and judging of 
single and ten -ear samples. 

Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $1.00. 

2. Small Grain Ifroduction. Oats, wheat, barley and rye; their 
botanical structure, soil and climatic adaptations, seed selection, seed- 
bed preparation and seeding, harvesting and uses; insects and dis- 
eases. Laboratory study of plants of each small grain crop; scoring, 



19 



judging and market grading of the different grains. 

Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $1.00. 

33. Forage Crop Production. Grasses, legumes and other plants 
suitable for pasture, hay, silage and soiling. Bou ^ical structure, soil 
and climatic adaptation, cultural and harvesting methods, and uses of 
the different forage plants. Identification of the plants, their seed and 
the common adulterants. 

Pre-requisites 1 and 2; recitation 2; lab. 1, 2 hrs.; credit 2%; fee 
$2.00. 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

2. Farm Management. Farming as a business; factors controlling 
the success of farming as found in farm surveys; types of farming; 
farm layout, forms of tenure and leases, organization and management 
of successful farms. 

Lectures and recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $1.00. 

FORESTRY 

36. Applied Lumbering. Logging and milling operations, including 
a detailed study of each operation in the production of lumber. Tools 
and machines used, and costs of operations. The consideration of a 
specified tract of timber for logging; location of camps, roads, rail- 
roads, chutes. Equipment necessary, and estimated cost of each op- 
eration. Summer Camp. 

Pre-requisite 54; credit 3. 

56. Camp Technique. Personal equipment for camp life; camp and 
cooking equipment. Camp food. Ration lists for trips of different kinds. 
Useful knots. Practice in throwing various packing hitches. Emergency 
equipment in case of sickness or accident. First aid practice. Summer 
Camp. 

Field and Demonstration work; credit 1. 




A Model Farmstead, One of the Kind Studied by Farm Managment Students. 



20 

57. Applied Forest Mensuration. The scaling of logs, the determin- 
ing of the volume of other forest products, and the reconnaissance of 
timbered areas. Complete reconnaissance of a specified area, includ- 
ing the running of primary and secondary base lines; the estimating 
and mapping of the timber by types, the making of contour maps, the 
writing of forest descriptions by watersheds, etc. Summer Camp. 

Pre-requisite 32; credit 5. 

58. Field Silviculture. A continuation of 52. Forest types; factors 
determining each. Type mapping. Natural reproduction of the forest 
under varying conditions. Improvement cuttings. Marking timber for 
cutting with reference to the silvicultural systems. Summer Camp. 

Pre-requisite 52; credit 3. 

Summer School Work in Forestry. The above courses will not be 
given at the college, but in the Forestry Summer Camp. The summer 
school in Forestry during 1918 will be held in three different locations. 
In the first session, the subjects of Camp Technique and Applied For- 
est Mensuration will be taken up. This work will be carried on in the 
forested region adjoining the Mississippi River in Iowa. In this work 
the students will be given practice in the various field operations, in- 
cluding the systems of measuring trees and stands in the forest, as 
well as preparing topographic, type, and other maps for use in Forest 
Management. 

65. Farm Forestry. (This course will be given at the College.) 
For agricultural students, teachers and those desiring a knowledge 
of forestry as applied to Iowa. A brief survey of forestry and its 
relation to other professions and industries is given as an intro- 
duction to this course. The tree, its parts and their functions. 
Light, heat, moisture, and soil requirements of trees. the more 
important trees as related to the farm. The infiuenec of trees 
and forests on the modification of wind and moisture conditions with 
special reference to the planting of windbreaks, shelterbelts and wood- 
lots in Iowa. The tree species best adapted for planting under the 
different conditions of climate, soil, moisture and topography. Estab- 
lishment, cultivation and protection of the shelterbelt and woodlot. 
Cost of establishment and returns from typical plantings. Woods of 
special value on the farm and their identification. The seasoning and 
preservation of lumber, posts, poles and other farm timbers. 

Recitation 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%. - 

HISTORY. 

History 6. Economic Development of Modern Europe. A rapid re- 
view of the transition from mediaeval to modern economy in the six- 
teenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, followed by a more de- 
tailed study of the economic development of Europe since 1815. Spe- 
cial attention given to the industrial revolution in England; the effect 
of the Napoleonic wars upon European agriculture and manufactures; 
the spread of the factory system into Belgium, France and Germany; 
the development of railways and canals; and the expansion of over- 
seas trade. Rise of socialism and labor organizations; the European 
tariff; and the growth of industrial concentration. Economic causes 
and problems of the European war and the probable effect of the war 
on agriculture, industry, and commerce. 

Recitation 2; credit 2. 

History 24. Economic History of American Agriculture. A prelim- 
inary survey of the economic history of American agriculture as a 
field for investigation, followed by a study of colonial agriculture; 






21 

the westward movement of pioneer and planter into the Mississippi 
Valley; the agrarian revolution and the opening of the far West; and 
the reorganization of the agricultural industry. Special attention 
given to the origin, growth, control, and disposition of the public do- 
main; the settlement of the West; the various influences affecting 
the growth of the agricultural industry and of agricultural society in 
the different sections; relation of agriculture to other industries, to 
politics, and to legislation; and an historical and comparative analysis 
of some of the present day problems confronting the farming class; 
tenancy, transportation, and rural organization. 

Recitations 2; credit 2. 

History 98. Research in Economic History. Credit 2 to 6 hours. 
Note: Students desiring credit in History 5 or 20 may take History 
6 or 24 as a substitute. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

1. Textiles and Clothing. (Drafting and the use of commercial 
patterns.) The designing and making of undergarments, involving the 
use of fundamental stitches and the use of the sewing machine. 
Household mending, patching and darning. Study of the cotton in- 
dustry. (First three weeks.) 

Rec. 1; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2V 3 ; fee $2.00. 

4. Textiles and Clothing. Continued use of drafting and commer- 
cial patterns as the basis of designing and making tailored waist and 
dress. Emphasis is placed first upon the choice of material from the 
standpoint of economy and beauty; second, accuracy in cutting, fit- 
ting and finishing. Study of the linen industry. (Second three weeks.) 

Pre-requisite 1; rec. 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2V 3 ; fee $2.00. 

6. Advanced Textiles and Clothing. Emphasis upon originality of 
design for a wool dress. Standards for judging line, dark and light, 
and color harmonies. The use of the electric power sewing machine 
with practice in the use of the attachments and the making of the 
tailored elements appropriate to woolen materials. Study of the wool 
industry. (First three weeks.) 

Pre-requisites 4 or 5, 51; rec. 1; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2V 3 ; fee $2.00. 

7. Advanced Textiles and Clothing. First problem: the renovation 
of old material, the combination of old and new materials in the mak- 
ing of a dress. Second problem: a spring gown of light weight mate- 
rial, silk voile, lawn, etc. Study of the silk industry. A comparative 
study of all textile industries. (Second three weeks.) 

Pre-requisite 6; rec. 1; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2y 3 ; fee $2.00. 

21a. Training in Teach mg Home Economics. This course is a Sum- 
mer session adaptation of the regular course in special methods and 
practice teaching. It is planned for teachers of home economics in 
grades and high schools. It includes a study of the choice of suitable 
subject-matter, method of presentation, equipment, illustrative mate- 
rial and a comparison of the more recent text books designed for 
grade and high school classes; the re-adjustment of our courses in 
foods and clothing to meet the present need of conservation ; the prob- 
lem of the hot lunch. Special emphasis will be placed upon the plan- 
ning of work in home economics for vocational schools. 

Recitation 2; credit 2. 

37. Millinery. Designing and drafting patterns for hats, the mak- 
ing and covering of buckram frames, the covering of wire frames ; the 
making of various types of trimming such as folds, pleating, cabo- 
chons, bows and flowers; the trimming and lining of hats. Renovation 
of materials and remodeling of old hats. The selection of hats based 



22 

upon design principles and knowledge of materials used. 
Pre-requisite 4; rec. 1; labs. 2, 2 hr; credit 2%; fee $3.00. 

43. Foods: Selection and Preparation. Foods, their history, manu- 
facture, production, composition, cost, and economic value. Effect of 
heat upon foods, and the principles involved in the preparation of 
typical foods. Special attention to acquiring ease and accuracy in the 
actual cooking processes. (First three weeks.) 

Chem. 110; rec. 1; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2V 3 ; fee $5.00. 

44. Foods: Selection and Preparation. Continuation of 43. (Sec- 
ond three weeks.) 

Pre-requisite 43; rec. 1; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $5.00. 

45. Nutrition and Dietetics. Fundamental principles of human nu- 
trition and the application of these principles under varying physio- 
logical, economic and social conditions; laboratory problems in the 
planning and preparation of dietaries for various types of normal in- 
dividuals in infancy, childhood, adolescence, adult life and old age. For 
the family group with diverse conditions of activity, age and financial 
circumstances. (First three weeks.) 

Chem. 403, Zool. 150, and H. Ec. 49; rec. 1; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3y 3 ; 
fee $6.00. 

46. Nutrition and Dietetics. Continuation of 45, with a study of 
therapeutic cookery and special attention to diet in disease. (Second 
three weeks.) 

Pre-requisite 45; rec. 1; labs. 3, 2 hr; credit 3y 3 ; fee $6.00. 

48. Foods: Advanced Cookery. Food preservation and conserva- 
tion, including lessons in canning, drying and pickling of foods; the 
making of war breads and all other possible substitutions for wheat, as 
well as substitution for animal fat, meat and sugar. (First three 
weeks.) 

Pre-requisite Chem. 376; rec. 1; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2y 3 ; fee $5.00. 

49. Foods: Marketing, Preparation and Serving of Meals. Practice 
in making of the menu with reference to the season, cost, availability 
of foods, and combinations suitable to existing conditions. Marketing, 
cooking and serving of the daily home meals, and meals for special oc- 
casions. The work in this course sums up all previous sophomore and 
junior food work. (Second three weeks.) 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $5.00. 

50. Design. Principles of design, proportion, subordination, rhythm, 
balance; value of tones and theory of color. These fundamental prin- 
ciples are applied to simple abstract problems in lettering, spacing, 
etc., and furnish the basis for specific problems offered in Home Eco- 
nomics 51. (First three weeks.) 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $2.00. 

51. Study of perspective exemplified in simple sketches of still 
life, furniture and architecture. Application of principles of design 
and color harmony to concrete problems; including designs for fab- 
rics; various useful articles, good in form; decorative posters, etc. 
(Second three weeks.) 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2V 3 ; fee $2.00. 

58. Industrial Handwork. The course will consist of a series of 
problems in paper folding, basketry, clay modeling, weaving (hand 
and loom), knitting and toy making. While this course will be of gen- 
eral interest, it is planned especially to meet the needs of teachers 
in play ground and "open air classes," and for convalescents in hos- 
pitals and sanitariums. 

Pre-requisite H. Ec. 51; lab. 1 or 2, 3 hrs.; 1 or 2 hrs. credit; fee 
$3.00. 

(No pre-requisite required if course is taken without credit.) 



23 

60. The House. A study of the evolution of domestic architecture. 
Relation and influence of historic art on American homes. Considera- 
tion of choice of site, essential elements in planning, construction and 
materials to meet the ideals of a modern home. Also study of water, 
heating, plumbing, ventilating and lighting systems. 

Original plans for a given lot, on a limited sum, are developed by 
each student. Also sketches of exterior elevations, involving a study 
of proportion, balance and color harmony as related to environment 
The laboratory is equipped with a small model house built to the scale 
of three-fourths inch to the foot. During each semester, several trips 
are made to the Practice House for the study of building and furnish- 
ing problems. (First three weeks.) 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2V 3 ; fee $2.00. 

61. The House. Continuation of 60. A study of the interior and 
complete furnishing of a house. Lectures on proportion, line, and 
spacing of architectural features, color schemes, historic styles of fur- 
niture, wall, and wood finishes, floor coverings, draperies, and acces- 
sories. Practice in developing color harmonies for various rooms. The 
final problem involves the choice of suitable furnishings and estima- 
tion of total cost of an ideal modern home. (Second three weeks.) 

Rec. 1; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2V 3 ; fee $2.00. 

70. Experimental Problems in Foods. The types of cooking ap- 
paratus; comparison of the cost of fuels; the types of food products, 
and the changes which occur in the preparation of foods. Elective. 
(First three weeks.) 

Pre-requislte Chem. 376, Physics 330. H. Ec. 44 or 74; rec. 1; las. 
2, 2 hr.;, credit 2V 3 ; fee $5.00. 

HORTICULTURE 

3. General Horticulture. Fruit growing and vegetable culture. Gen- 
eral exercises in propagation, planting, and management of fruits and 
vegetables. 

Recitations 2; labs. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $1.00. 

38. Plant Propagation. Asexual and sexual methods; germinating, 
testing, and storage of seeds; multiplication of plants by cuttage, layer- 
age, and graftage; nursery methods and management. 

Prerequisites Botany 268 or 269, Chem. 351; recitation 1, lectures 
and lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.00. 

333. Truck Farming. Growing and marketing of the more important 
truck crops, such as the potato, cabbage, onion, and tomato. The 
trucking interests of Iowa. 

Recitations 2; credit 2. 

MANUAL TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

The manual training and industrial arts courses are organized at 
present under other departments. The manual training courses in 
wood work are listed under Mechanical Engineering as courses 140. 
241, and 331. The courses in mechanical and industrial drawing 
are listed under Mechanical Engineering as courses 121, 141, and 181. 
Industrial arts courses are listed under Agricultural Engineering- 
courses 1, 39, 40. These courses, together with courses 141 and 331 
in Mechanical Engineering are organized on a vocational basis and 
should appeal to manual training teachers as offering an opportunity 
for securing work which will help to meet the increasing demand for 
the vocational type of work in our schools. 

MATHEMATICS 

30. Algebra and Trigonometry. Definitions; positive and negative 



24 

angles; circular measures of angles; operations upon angles; functions 
of angles, their relations and varying values; determination of values 
of the functions of particular angles; functions of different angles ex- 
pressed in terms of those of a basal angle; derivation and reduction of 
trigonometric formulas; solution of right and oblique triangles. Use of 
logarithms, solution of right and oblique triangles, with practical ap- 
plication. 

Pre-requisite, entrance algebra; recitations 3; credit 3. 

40a. Algebra (one-half time). This course covers the work taken 
up during the first part of College Algebra and is devoted to a review 
of the fundamental principles of algebra up to and including quadratic 
equations. 

It is an excellent preparation for any student planning to enter col- 
lege from a non-accredited high school and the record will be taken in 
lieu of the entrance examination in mathematics for such students. 
For those who have been out of high school for a number of years and 
need review or for teachers desiring to take examinations for certifi- 
cates, it will prove a very desirable course. It should not be taken by 
those who have not had at least a year of work in algebra in high 
school or its equivalent. No college credit is given. 

40. College Algebra. The first part of this course is devoted to a 
review of algebra up to and including quadratic equations. This is fol- 
lowed by variation, the progressions, binomial theorem, partial frac- 
tions, principles and use of logarithms, and theory of equations. 

Recitations 3; credit 3. 

43. Plane Analytic Geometry. Representation of points, lines and 
curves in a plane, careful study of the graphs of equations, and inves- 
tigation of the Line, the circle, and the conic sections. 

Recitations 4; credit 4. 

45. Calculus. Differential calculus — expansion of functions, inde- 
terminate forms, tangents, normals, asympotes, direction of curvature, 
points of inflexion, radius of curvature, envelopes, and maxima and 
minima; integral calculus — applications made to determine areas, 
lengths of curves, surfaces of revolution, volumes of solids of revolu- 
tion and other solids, applications of double integration to areas, sur- 
faces, centers of gravity. Elements of differential equations. 

Pre-requisite 44; recitations 5; credit 5. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

121. Mechanical Drawing. Use of drawing instruments, practice in 
lettering and detailing, making of isometric and shop drawings. 
Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2. 

140. Manual Training. Care and adjustment of hand and power 
tools, joinery, cabinet making, wood finishing, polishing and varnish- 
ing, wood turning, and carving. For students in industrial science and 
home economics who desire to teach manual training. 

Recitation 1; lab. 1, 4 hr.; credit 1%; fee $2.00. 

141. Vocational Drawing. Use of drawing instruments; ortho- 
graphic projection; isometric and working drawings. For teachers in 
manual training and consolidated schools. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2. 

181. Mechanical Drawing. Same as 121, but less complete. 

Lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 1. 

219. Projective Drawing. Principles of projection of the point, line, 
and plane as applied in the preparation of general and detail engineer- 
ing, drawings of machines and structures. 

Pre-requisite 121 or 181; recitation 1; lab. 1, 3hr; credit 3. 

220. Projective Drawing. Same as 219 but less complete. 



25 

Pre-requisite 121 or 181; recitations 1; lab 1, 3 hr; credit 2. 

245. Vocational Wood Work. Advanced work in manual training 
for teachers; courses of instruction for rural and graded schools; de- 
tailed study of tools; bench and lathe work to meet needs of individual 
students. 

Pre-requisite 140 or equivalent; lectures and lab. 1, 4 hr. ; credit 1%; 
fee $2.00. 

322. Mechanical Drawing. Sketching of machine details, prepara- 
tion of scaled shop drawings, lettering, tracing, and blue printing. 

Pre-requisites 121 or 181 and 219 or 220; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2. 

331. Pattern Work. Principles of joinery, wood turning and carving, 
and foundry practice applied to making of simple patterns and core 
boxes for cast iron, brass, and aluminum castings. 

Pre-requisite 232; labs. 2, 3 hr; credit 2; fee $5.00. 

401. Mechanics of Engineering. Principles of pure mechanics as ap- 
plied in engineering problems involving statics, graphics, and strength 
of materials. 

Pre-requisite Math. 44; recitation 3; credit 3. 

423. Kinematic Drawing. Study of mechanisms; location of virtual 
centers, construction of velocity and acceleration diagrams, cams and 
linkages. 

Pre-requisite 322; lab. 1, 3 hr; credit 1. 

437. Advanced Pattern Work. Special pattern work; gearing, 
sweep and molding machine work. 

Pre-requisite 331; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 1; fee $2.00. 

MUSIC 

Members of the Summer School and others desiring musical instruc- 
tion will be offered courses in Voice and Piano. The regular Summer 
Course in music will consist of three lessons a week, private lessons. 
These lessons are extra and not included in the regular college fee 
and must be arranged for with (the director of the School of Music. 
The fees are payable in advance at the Treasurer's Office. 

Anyone desiring a lesser number of lessons than the regular Sum- 
mer Course will pay a slightly higher rate than the following prices : 

Three lessons a week in Voice, $18.00 for six weekis. 

Three lessons a week in Piano, $18.00 for isix weeks. 

The practice pianos of the School of Music will be at the disposal of 
students at the following rates: One hour a day for the six weeks or 
less, $1.50; two hours a day, $2.50; three hours a day, $3.50. 

These are the regular rates charged in this department during the 
college year. For further details address, 

Archibald A. Bailey, 
Director, School of Music. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE (For Women) 

P. C. S-l. Elementary Gymnastics. Swedish, folk dancing, games, 
light apparatus. 

Lab. 1 hr. daily; fee $2.50. 

Equivalent to P. C. 1 and 2. Indoor work as stated in college catalog. 

P. C. S-2. Swimming. Instruction for beginners only. 

Lab. 1 hr., daily; first three weeks. 

The swimming pool will be open afternoons and evenings for alt 
who know how to swim. Swimming suits may be rented or purchased 
from the department. 

To all students classified in P. C. S-l who have a final average of 
85% and who have satisfactorily completed at least four hours of prac- 



26 

tice teaching in the gymnasium, will be granted an official recom- 
mendation from the department. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING (For Men) 

5. Theory and Practice of Coaching. Theory of Play. Sportsman- 
ship. Rules. Training. Physiology. Anatomy. Hygiene. Actual 
Competition. Actual Coaching. 

Lecture 1; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2V 3 . 

PHYSICS 

205. Mechanics, Heat and Light. Fundamental principles of physics; 
and their applications. (Carried in combination with 330.) 

Pre-requisite Math. 17; lecture 1; recitation 1; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 3; 
fee $2.00. 

330. General Physics. Principles of mechanics, heat, electricity 
and its applications, sound and light, including color and illumination. 
For Home Economics students. 

Lectures 2; recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 5; fee $2.00. 

404. Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Sound. Pre-requisite 303; 
lectures and recitations 5; lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 5; fee $2.00. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

6. Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence. Characteristics of 
childhood and the significant mental changes of the adolescent period; 
the individual, the parental, and the social instincts; the adaptive in- 
stincts — imitation, curiosity, play; the regulative instinct, moral and 
religious; the collecting and the constructive instincts. The Montessori 
system and its application, illustrated by simple apparatus; the kin- 
dergarten; the educational value of play. The psychology of adoles- 
ence; the boy scout movement, the girls' camp-fire, athletics. The 
psychology of cooking clubs and corn-judging contests. 

Recitations 3; credit 3. 

7. Outlines of Psychology. An introduction to the study of the 
normal adult human mind. A foundation for all the other studies in 
Psychology. 

Recitations 3; credit 3. 

8. Educational Psychology. A treatment of special phases of Gen- 
eral and Genetic Psychology which are most applicable to education. 
The processes of adaptation; instinct, impulse, habit, and will; the ap- 
plied psychology of perception, imagination, memory, association, at- 
tention, interest, simple feelings, emotions, and the higher thought 
processes; special problems; mental inheritance, the learning curve,, 
individual differences, etc. 

Recitations 3; credit 3. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

2. The Fundamentals of Public Speaking. To help the student get 
command of himself. Attention is especially given to voice building 
and expression. 

Recitation 1; credit 1. 

3. Interpretation. Methods of vocal interpretation, criticism and 
delivery- Beside the class lectures and class exercises on topics per- 
taining to interpretation and delivery, each student is instructed pri- 
vately and personally at stated intervals throughout the semester. 

F're-requisite 2 or its equivalent; recitations 2; credit 2. 

10. Extempore Speech. To develop the powers of sincere and effect- 
ive public speaking. The fundamental principles of speech organiza- 
tion and delivery studied according to the true extemporaneous meth- 






27 

ad. The assimilation of the essentials of effective speaking and the 
working out of these essentials into actual practice before the audi- 
ence. Each student is given the opportunity to appear in an original 
speech before his fellow students at least once every week or ten days. 
Recitations 2; credit 2. 

SOILS 

loo. Special Problems in Soil Physics. Experimentation rehting to 
the physical characteristics of soils and their relation to crop produc- 
tion. A wide range of special subjects. Special advantages for a 
study of the physical composition of soils. 

Pre-requisite 121 or 141; investigations 6 hours; credit 2; deposit $4. 

141. Soil Physics. The origin, formation and classification of soils. 
A study of moisture, temperature and aeration in soils, together wi/th 
the conditions influencing changes in these factors. The proper prepar- 
ation of seed beds by ordinary farm operations in relation to the se- 
curing of optimum physical soil conditions. A general study of all the 
physical properties of soils. 

Pre-requisites Physics 205 or 303; rec. 2; labs. 2, 2 hr; credit, 3V 3 ; 
deposit $4.00. 

304. Special Problems in Soil Fertility. Experimentation relating 
to maintaining and increasing the productive capacity of soils. A (study 
of soil taken from the home farm, with a view of determining the 
best systems of soil and crop management. Valuable for men who 
expect to farm under corn-belt conditions. 

Pre-requisite 322 or 342; investigations 6 hrs.; credit 2; deposit $5. 

342. Soil Fertility. Maintenance of fertility; the influence of com- 
mercial fertilizers, barnyard manure and green manure upon the qual- 
ity and yield of various crops; the effect of different crops upon the 
fertility of the soils and upon succeeding crops; different systems of 
rotation, and the effect upon the productiveness of the soil of various 
methods of soil management. Fertility of samples of soils from the 
home farm or any other soil. 

Pre-requisite 141 and Chem. 352; for Dairy, Chem. 352 only; for 
Hort., Ag. Ed. and Ag. Eng., 141 only; recitations 2; lab. 2, 2 hr.; 
credit 3y 3 ; deposit $8.00. 



GENERAL COURSES 



High School teachers are more and more interested in securing reg- 
ular college credit work in agriculture, so that the general course for 
high school teachers is no longer continued. Superintendents and high 
school teachers can secure a combination of work in different depart- 
ments which will enable them to secure a general view of the subject 
in a single summer if necessary. However, for rural and grade teach- 
ers, and for farmers, business men and homemakers, general courses 
are continued. 

GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

S-2. Agriculture. Each summer there have .been a few farmers and 
business men and women desiring to get a general knowledge of the 
fundamentals of agriculture from the combined scientific and practical 
point of view. The demands of such individuals vary so much that it 
is necessary to take up each case and arrange a schedule accordingly. 
While one will desire to devote his full time to a study of farm ani- 
mals, another will desire all of his time on the study of soils or plants 
or orcharding. It has been found possible to meet these demands quite 
fully and to give a combination of work which will enable each indi- 
vidual to get economically the practical information which he desires. 
Since those asking for this particular course do not ask for college 
credit, they are given considerable freedom, the sole purpose being to 
meet their demand in a satisfactory way. It is suggested that individ- 
uals knowing before hand that they will ask for this course write some 
what in detail the work which they desire. This will give an oppor- 
tunity for consultation in arranging the course satisfactorily. 

HOMEMAKERS' COURSES 

The division of Home Economics will offer beginning and continua- 
tion courses of a very practical nature for homemakers of the state 
who may desire to take advantage of the summer work. This work 
has always been very popular because of its intensely practical nature 
and this summer it has been decided to offer all courses co-ordinately, 
that is, without any pre-requislte requirements. 

Women who desire to come for the first three weeks of the Summer 
School can secure available units of work in the homemakers' courses 
and have at the same time an opportunity of attending the Rural Life 
Conference. 

The SH courses correspond to those given in the regular Two-year 
Home Economics course and are open to the students enrolled in that 
department. 

SHI. Food Study and Preparation. Skill and efficiency in handling 
materials, utensils, stoves, fuels; systematic work in the kitchen. 
Fuels: origin, cleanliness, cost. Utensils: comparison of materials 
used and cost. Poods considered as to their source, manufacture, 
classification, composition, cost, and their function in the body. Prac- 
tice cooking. (First three weeks.) 

Recitation 1; lab. 2, 2 hr; credit ZV 3 ', fee $3.00. 

SH2. Handwork and Garment Making. Fundamental sewing stitches 
on sewing apron; patching and darning; use and adjustment of sew- 
ing machine and its attachments. Altering commercial patterns to 



29 

measurements. Two cooking laboratory aprons, and underwear; ad- 
vantages of chosen design. Emphasize economical placing of pattern, 
methods of making and finishing. Estimate cost. Students provide 
materials subject to approval. (First three weeks.) 

Recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $1.00. 

SH5. Food Study and Preparation. The five food constituents; 
composition, manufacture, classification, digestion, economic and food 
value of foods; special foods; menus; table manners, table setting, 
meal serving and care of the dining room. (Second three weeks.) 

Pre-requisite SHI; recitations 2; albs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3V 3 ; fee $3.00. 

SH6. Dressmaking. Accurate measurement, preparation and use of 
dress form, comparison of drafted and commercial patterns. Plan- 
ning, cutting, fitting and finishing of house dresses; a light weight 
wool dress and a lingerie dress. Study choice of materials, suitable 
designs and cost. Care and repair of garments. Especially planned 
for women who wish to become more skilled in home sewing. (Sec- 
ond three weeks.) 

Recitation 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2V 3 ; fee $1.00. 




School Gardening- Training Class. 

533. Millinery. Designing and drafting patterns for hats, making 
and covering of buckram frames, covering of wire frames; making 
various types of trimming such as fold, pleating, cabochons, bows, 
and flowers; trimming and lining of hats. Renovation of materials 
and remodeling of old hats. The selection of hats based upon design, 
principles and knowledge of materials used. 

Pre-requisite: a general knowledge of hand sewing; recitation 1; 
labs. 2, 2 hr.; fee $3.00. 

534. Design. Principles of design, proportion, subordination, rhythm, 
balance; value of tones and theory of color. These fundamental prin- 
ciples are applied to abstract problems in lettering, spacing, etc., and 
furnish the basis for specific problems offered in the latter three 
weeks of the course. (First three weeks.) 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; fee $2.00. 

535. Design. Study of perspective exemplified in simple sketches 
of still life, furniture and architecture. Application of principles of 



30 




Judging Seed Corn. 



design and color harmony to concrete problems; including designs for 
fabrics; various useful articles, good in form; decorative posters, etc. 
(Second three weeks.) 
Rec. 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; fee $2.00. 

RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSE 
Tuition Free 

(Students who are high school graduates may take college credit 
work upon payment of the fee.) 

This course is offered to enable rural and grade teachers to have 
the advantages of the unusual facilities of the Iowa State College in 
preparation for teaching agriculture, home economics and manual 
training in the public schools in an intelligent and effective manner. 
The instruction will emphasize the elementary side of the subjects, 
giving particular attention to methods of preparing material, and of 
organizing the work in rural schools. The laboratories and teaching 
equipment of the college, including the library and the experiment 
farms, will be available to the students, but the aim throughout will 
be to so handle the work as to illustrate the possibilities of doing the 
work effectively under rural school conditions. The primary object 
of the course is to give work in the industrial subjects to present and 
prospective teachers, and other work will be offered only when car- 
ried along with industrial work. 

Admission to this course requires graduation from the common 
schools and the recommendation of the county superintendent of 
schools. 

This course makes provision for the following work: 

1. General Agriculture S-4. Topics dealt with are farm animals, 
including horses, cattle, sheep and swine, but with particular emphasis 
upon poultry. Poultry is considered by the state department and oth- 
ers as a topic particularly adapting itself for treatment in the rural 
and grade schools. The course will give the student a definite knowl- 
edge of the qualities to expect in good stock and will consider selec- 
tion, improvement, care and management. Attention will also be given 
to dairying, including the use of the Babcock test. 

2. Home Economics S-32. Sewing. This course includes the teach- 
ing of plain sewing upon articles which may be made in the one-room 
rural school. The emphasis will be upon plain sewing. Help will be 






31 



given in the selection of materials, and the practical work of cutting, 
finishing and repairing of garments. 

3. Home Economics S-37. Cooking. This course aims to teach the 
fundamental principles of foods and their preparation so that the rural 
school teacher will have a knowledge of the facts necessary for the 
teaching of cooking. Subjects treated include food preparation, food 
value to the body and the planning and serving of economical meals. 
This work will be done in the regular college laboratories. 

4. Home Economics S-38. This is the general course for rural 
and grade teachers. The work will be done under conditions and with 
equipment that can be easily duplicated in the rural schools. For part, 
of the work a specially devised rural school home economics cabinet 
will be used. The emphasis will be placed upon the planning of a suit- 
able course of lessons, demonstration with the pupils of the model 
school as a class, lesson planning, co-operation with the home and nec- 
essary equipment. The purpose is to give the teacher a definite plan so 
that she will willingly carry out the work in her school next winter. 

5. General Manual Training S-6. The introductory course of six 
weeks in general manual training will deal with the rougher and more 
practical farm problems and includes such exercises as saw horse, 
bench hook, nail box, corn tray, bird house, hog trough, milking stool, 
bench vise, seed sample case, chicken brooder, etc. Because of the 
bulky nature of the models in the exercises undertaken in this course, 
materials will be furnished without a fee and at the close of the course 
students will be given an option to purchase the models at actual cost 
of material. 

6. General Manual Training S-7. This will be a continuation of gen- 
eral manual training S-6, but will deal more particularly with farm 
home problems. The exercises will require more refined work and a 
higher degree of finish and will include the necessary basis in draw- 
ings and readings of the same. The following are some of the exercises 
which will be undertaken: Book rack, plant stand, waste basket, medi- 




Helping Win the War 



32 

cine case, hall tree, porch swing, bulletin case, screen, small step lad- 
der, sleeve board, fly trap, etc. Students will pay for lumber actually 
used and the completed work will become the property of the student. 
Double period daily. 

7. Manual Training S-15. Basketry and Weaving. Lower grade 
work, carried in connection with Didactics III. Not offered separately. 

Note 1. Teachers will be interested in knowing of the ruling of the 
state educational board of examiners to the effect that grades in agri- 
culture, home economics, and manual training when carried success- 
fully for 12 weeks may be transferred direct to the certificate without 
further examination. 

Note 2. Home economics students are requested to wear wash 
dresses in the cooking laboratories. White aprons, hand towels and 
holders will also be required. 

8. Didactics. The work in didactics for rural and grade teachers 
will consist of three courses, as follows : 

Didactics I. — A general course of didactics having in mind the pre- 
paration of the teacher for school work and for passing the examina- 
tion. The course will deal with management, study and the technique 
of the recitation. 

Didactics II. Special methods in arithmetic, geography and history 
for the upper grades. Some attention to other subjects. 

The recently adopted reading circle book, Wilson's Motivation of 
School Work, will be used as basic text for this course. 

Didactics III. — Primary methods with particular attention to primary 
reading, busy work, and the special problems of the primary teacher. 
This course will be handled again during the coming summer by Miss 
Bertha Stiles, who has made it such a valuable course for lower grade 
teachers. 

9. Other Work. Teachers of any grade who are enrolled in the 
Summer Session and are prepared to take college credit work may 
select subjects offered in the college credit list in so far as they are 
prepared to enter these classes. To secure college credit, the student 
must meet the usual preliminary requirements. It is customary here, 
as in other colleges and universities, to waive certain requisites in 
cases of mature students who obviously are prepared to take college 
grade work and for good reason have not complied with all of the for- 
mal requirements. 

The following list of college credit subjects will be of particular in- 
terest to rural and grade teachers. See descriptions under college 
credit courses. 

Algebra 40a 
History 24 
Economics 110 

Physics 330 
English 10, 11 
Public- Speaking '\ 
Drawing 50-51 

S<<- schedules of recitations on page — 

La i year 75'/ of the rural and grade teachers were qualified to 
take college credit work. Accordingly the time schedule of the classes 
lei the above work has been arranged to permit this work to be taken 
in connection with their other studies. In addition to the above, work 
in Music and in Physical Culture, including swimming, is open for 
i oral and grade teachers. 



33 

FEES IN GENERAL COURSES 

There will be no fees in connection with the work for rural and srade 
teachers. In the industrial subjects, students may take the finished 
product on payment of the actual cost of materials used. 

MODEL SCHOOL PROGRAM 

Room 1, Central, Grades First and Third. 
Room 3, Central, Grades Fifth and Eighth. 

Note: Work in the model school begins at 8 o'clock and continues 
until 11:30. In the lower grades emphasis will be placed upon read- 
ing, language, numbers, busy work. History, geography, and nature 
work will be secondary and more or less related to the language and 
story work. 

The work in the upper grades will place greater emphasis upon Eng- 
lish, arithmetic, physiology and geography and will also demonstrate 
the possibilities of work in home economics and agriculture. The rural 
school plan on home economics work will be demonstrated. The work 
in agriculture will be correlated with the school plot at the college 
and the home project work being carried by the pupils. Definite 
schedule of program is not here given because of the necessity of 
changing the program in order to properly accommodate the work for 
observation purposes. 

SUMMER MILITARY CAMP 

In view of the possibilities of unusual war needs between this and 
the opening of the summer school, it seems inadvisable to attempt at 
this time to make any definite announcement as to the military work 
to be offered. Last year the work given consisted of the following 
courses. 

Military Drill 
Infantry Drill Regulations 
Field Regulations 
Military Sanitation and Hygiene 
Camp Cookery 
Automobile Engineering 
Principles of operation 
Repair work and adjustment 
Instruction in driving 
Signal Corps 
Telephone engineering 
Wireless telegraph 
Electric power 
Telegraph code practice 
Agricultural Engineering 
Tractors 

Tractor operation 
Military Engineering 

Military topography and mapping 
Military bridges 
Military roads and railroads 
Field fortifications 
Whether last year's work, other work, or no work in military lines 
will be offered this summer will depend upon the recognized needs of 
the nation, and the needs of Iowa men who are entering national ser- 
vice. 



34 

The College stands ready to help in any way which may seem advis- 
able at the time. If the War Department should need the facilities of 
the College in a more extended manner than last year, the College 
authorities will gladly co-operate. 

SUGGESTIONS TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

1. Read carefully the description of the various courses and other 
matter in this bulletin, and if the information is not sufficiently spe- 
cific, do not hesitate to write for particulars. 

2. Fill out and mail the information blank on page — which will 
give us an idea of your demands. This places you under no obliga- 
tions, but it gives the Director of the Summer Session a better basis 
for making plans to handle the work on an efficient basis when you 
arrive. For limitations on the amount of work that may be carried 
in the rural and grade teachers' course, see page 14 of this bulletin. 

3. Upon your arrival at the depot at Ames, make yourself known to 
a member of the Reception Comimittee, who will be recognized by the 
college badge. If for any reason you miss the committee, take the 
college car to the college, and get off at Central Station. Men go di- 
rect to Alumni Hall, women to Margaret Hall. Room assignments 
will be made at these buildings. After securing a room, you are ready 
for registration. If you come on the interurban, get off at the Campus 

4. The following is the plan of registration: 

(1) Go to the Registrar's office, fill out the two cards there 
furnished you, pay the Summer Session fee (or deposit certificates 
signed by your superintendent, entitling you to free tuition in 
rural and grade teachers' course, and obtain a receipt. 

(2) From the registrar's office, you will be directed with refer- 
ence to classifying officers. Complete classification. 

(3) If any of your courses carry laboratory fees, fee cards may 
be secured from the instructors, and fees paid at the Treasurer's 
office. 

5. There are ample accommodations, and advanced notice is not 
necessary. The college has been accustomed to handling 3,000 stu- 
dents during the regular year, and knows how to do it. However, if 
vour plans are matured sufficiently early, it will assist in rapid as- 
signment and registration if advanced notice is given. 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS 

Where schedules can be changed to the advantage of some students 
without inconvenience to others, changes will be made on Monday 
evening, June 3. 

Recitations daily unless otherwise specified. 

Abbreviations: A. Ed. — Agricultural Education. A. E. — Agricultural En- 
gineering. A. J. — Agricultural Journalism. Ag. H.— Agricultural Hall. A. H. 
— Animal Husbandry. Bac. — Bacteriology. Bot. — Botany. Cen. — Central 
Building. Chem. — Chemistry. C. B. — Chemistry Building. D. B. — Dairy 
Building. Econ. — Economics. En. A. — Engineering Annex. En. H. — Engi- 
neering Hall. Eng. — English. F. C. — Farm Crops. F. Mang. — Farm Man- 
agement. For. — Forestry. Geo. — Geology. Gen. Sc. — General Science. Gym. 
— Gymnasium. H. E. — Home Economics. H. E. B. — Home Economics Build- 
ing. Hist. — History. Hort. — Horticulture. Lab. — Laboratory. Lit. — Litera- 
ture. L. P. — Lower Pavilion. M. H. — Margaret Hall. Math. — Mathematics. 
M. E. — Mechanical Engineering. O. A. — Old Agricultural Hall. P. C. — 
Physical Culture. P. S. — Pattern Shop. Phys. — Physics. Psych. — Psychol- 
ogy-. Pub. Sp. — Public Speaking. R. — Room. Rec. Recitation. Sc. B. — 
Science Building. U. P. — Upper Pavilion. Zool. — Zoology. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 

(First Half) 



Course 



E. 1 
E. 5 
E. 19 
E. 36 
E. 39 
E. 40 
Ed. 1 
Ed. 2 
Ed. 7 
Ed. 8 
Ed. 10 
A. Ed. 21a 
A. Ed. 31a 
A. Ed. 31b 
A. H. 1 



A. H. 2 
A. H. 3 
A. H. 4 
A. J. 8 
A. J. 9 
Bac. 1 
Bac. 15 
Bac. 18 
Bac. 30 
Bot. 161 
Bot. 470 
Bot. 560 

Chem. 103 

Chem. 104 

Chem. 351 



Hour of Recitation 



Lab. 9-12 T. Th. S. 

Rec. 8, Lab. 3-5 Tu. Th. Sat. 

Rec. 9 M. W. F. 

Lab. 10-12 M. W. F. 

Lab. 2-5 M. W. F. 

Lab. 2-5 T. Th. S. 

Rec. 2 daily 

Rec. 7 daily 

Rec. 9 daily 

Rec. 10 daily 

Rec. 8 daily 



Rec. 8 
Rec. 1 
Rec. 3 
Sec. 1 
10-12 
Rec. 3 
Rec. 4 
Rec 
Rec 
Rec 
Rec 
Rec 



daily 
daily 
daily 
7-9. Sec. 



2 3-5 



12 



Lab. 7-9 
4, Lab. 10-12 
11 daily 
3 daily 

10, Lab. 6-3 hr. 
10, Lab. 3-2 hr. 
7, Lab. 2 hrs. daily 
As arranged 

Rec. 8, M. W. F., Lab. 3-5, M. W. F. 
Rec. 11, Lab. 1-4 
Rec. 10 M. W. F., Lab. 1-3, Tu. Th. 

Sat. 
Rec. 9 daily, 2 M. W. F. 

Lab. 10-12 daily 
Rec. 8 daily 

Lab. 9-12 daily 
Rec. 11 daily, 2 M. W. F. 
Lab. 8-10 M. W. F. 



Room 



107 O. A. 
204 O. A. 
204 O. A. 
204 O. A. 
100 O. A. 
100 O. A. 
210 Ag. H. 
210 Ag. H. 
11 Cen. 
208Ag. H. 
306 Ag. H. 
10 H. E. 
306 Ag. H. 
306 Ag. H. 
U. P. 
U. P. 

120 Ag. H., 
109 Ag. H., 
19 Ag. H. 
19 Ag. H. 
105 Sc. B. 
105 Sc. B. 
105 Sc. B. 
105 Sc. B. 
312 Cen. 
312 Cen. 
312 Cen. 



15 

234 
15 

234 
15 

234 



L. P. 
L. P. 



2b 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONC— Continued. 



Chem. 352 


Rec. 9 daily 


286 


C. B. 




Lab. 8-10 daily 


234 


C. B. 


Chem. 375 


Rec. 7 daily, 2 M. W. F. 


286 


C. B. 




Lab. 8-10 daily 


234 


C. B. 


Chem. 376 


Rec. 11 daily 


286 


C. B. 




Lab. 8-10 daily 


234 


C. B. 


Chem. 403 


Rec. 9 daily 


125 


C. B. 




Lab. 7-9 daily 


234 


C. B. 


Chem. 801 


As arranged 






Dairy 12 


Rec. 2 daily 


11 


D. B. 




Lab. 3-5 M. W. F. 


12 


D. B. 


Dairy 36 


Rec. 1 daily 


11 


D. B. 




Lab. 10-12 M. W. F. 


12 


D. B. 


Econ. 110 


Rec. 2 daily, 4 M. W. F. 


306 Ag. H. 


Econ. 424 


Rec. 3 daily 


210 Ag. H. 


F. C. 1 


Rec. 9 daily, Lab. 1-3 M. W. F. 


307 


Ag. H. 


F. C. 2 


Rec. 8 daily, Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. S. 


307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 33 


Rec. 7 daily, Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. S. 


307 Ag. H. 


F. Mang. 2 


Rec. 10 daily, Lab. 3-5, M. W. F. 


307 Ag. H. 


Eng. 10 


Rec. 9 daily, 4 M. W. F. 


13 


Cen. 


Eng. 11 


Rec. 10 daily, 1 Tu. Th. S. 


13 


Cen. 


Eng. 230 


Rec. 3 


13 


Cen. 


Eng. 401 


Rec. 4 


11 


Cen. 


Eng. 412 


Rec. 2 


13 


Cen. 


Forestry 65 


Rec. 7 daily 


209 Ag. H. 




Lab. 3-2 hrs. 


or 




As arranged 


in 1 


field 


Hist. 6 


Rec. 2 daily 


208 


Cen. 


Hist. 24 


Rec. 8 daily 


208 


Cen. 


Hist. 98 


As arranged. 2-6 hrs. 






H. E. 1-4 


Rec. 7 daily, Lab. 8-12 


110 


H. E. 


H. E. 6-7 


Rec. 7 daily 


14 


H. E. 




Lab. 8-12 


102 


H. E. 


H. E. 21a 


Rec. 8 daily 


10 


H. E. 


H. E. 37 


Rec. 11 daily 


10 


H. E. 




Lab. 1-5 


111 


H. E. 


H. E. 43-44 


Rec. 7 daily 








Lab. 8-12 


202 


H. E. 


H. E. 45-46 


Rec. 7 daily 


10 


H. E. 




Lab. 8-12, 1-4 daily 


200 


H. E. 


H. E. 48-49 


Rec. 7, Lab. 8-12 daily 


208 


H. E. 


H. E. 50-51 


Rec. 11 -daily 


7 


H. E. 




Lab. 1-5 daily 


206 


H. E. 


H. E. 58 


Rec. & Lab. 1-5 


170 


C. B. 


H. E. 60-61 


Rec. 9 daily 


14 


H. E. 




Lab. 7-9, 10-12 


206 


H. E. 


H. E. 70 


Rec. 11 daily 


14 


H. E. 




Lab. 1-5 daily 


208 


H. E. 


Hort. 3 


Rec. 9, Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. Sat. 


210 Ag. H. 


Math. 30 


Rec. 8 daily, 1 Tu. Th. F. 


215 


Cen. 


Math. 40a 


Rec. 7 daily 


215 


Cen. 


Math. 40 


Rec. 9 daily, 2 M. W. F. 


215 


Cen. 


Math. 43 


Rec. 9 daily, 2 daily 


214 


Cen. 


Math. 45 


Rec. 7 daily, 1 daily 


213 


Cen. 


M. E. 121 


1-5 


403 


En. H. 


M. E. 140 


Rec. 7 Tu. Th. Sat, Lab. 8-10, 10- 








12, 1-3, 3-5 


203 


En. A. 


M. E. 181 


1-5 


403 


En. H. 



37 



M. E. 219 
M. E. 220 
M. E. 245 

M. E. 331 
M. E. 401 
P. C. SI 
P. C. S2 
P. T. 5 
Phys. 205 
Phys. 330 

Phys. 404 

Psych. 6 
Psych. 7 
Pub. Sp. 2 
Pub. Sp. 3 
Pub. Sp. 10 
Soils 103 
Soils 141 
Soils 304 
Soils 342 



Rec. 10 M 
Rec. 10 M. 
Rec. 7 M. 

1-3, 3-5 
8-10, 1-5 
Rec. 8 
4-5 daily 
5-6 M. W. 
4-6 daily 
As arranged 
Rec 9 daily. 3 or 4 

Lab. 10-12 M. W. 
Rec. 8 and 3 daily 

Lab. 10-12 M. W 
Rec. 11 daily, 4 Tu. 



. W. F. 
W. P., 
W. F., 



F. 



Lab. 8-12 
Lab. 8-12, 1-5 
Lab. 8-10, 10-12, 



daily 
F. 

F. 

Th. Sat. 



Rec. 8 daily, 4 M. W. F. 

Rec. 10 M. W. F. 

Rec. 7 daily 

Rec. 11 daily 

As arranged 

Rec. 8 daily, Lab. 10-12 

As arranged 

Rec. 9 daily, Lab. 1-3 



403 En. 
403 En. 



203 En. A. 
P. S. 

205 En H. 
M. H. Gym 
M. H. Gym. 
205 Gym. 



207 En. 
210 En. 
207 En. 



H 
H. 
H. 

En. H. 

Cen. 



210 
210 
210 Cen. 
311 Cen. 



311 
311 



11 

7 



Cen. 

Cen. 

11 Ag. H. 

7 Ag. H. 

Ag. H. 

Ag. H. 



GENERAL AND RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSES 
(First Half) 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 




Room 


Agriculture S-4 


1-3 


L. P. 


Didactics I 


Rec. 8 


10 


Cen. 


Didactics II 


Rec. 3 


10 


Cen. 


Didactics III 


Rec.2 


10 


Cen. 


H. E. S.H. 1-5 


Rec. 7 daily, Lab. 8-12 


210 


H. E. 


H. E. S.H. 2-Q 


Rec. 7 daily, Lab. 8-12 


100 


H. E. 


H. E. S-32 


Rec. & Lab. 3-5 


100 


H. E. 


H. E. S-33 


Rec. 11 daily 


10 


H. E. 


H. E. S-34-35 


Rec. 11 daily 


7 


H. E. 




Lab. 1-5 


306 


H. E. 


H. E. S-37 


Rec. & Lab. 1-3 


202 


H. E, 


H, E. S-38 


Rec. & Lab. 8-10 


7 


H. E. 


Manual Training S-6 


Sec. 1, 8-10; Sec. 2, 1-3 


302 


En. An. 


Manual Training S-7 


Sec. 1, 1012; Sec. 2, 3-5 


302 


En. An. 


Music 


As arranged 






Algebra 40a 


Rec. 8 M. T. W. Th. F. 


214 


Cen. 


"Economics 110 


Rec. 10 daily, 2 M. W. F. 


222 


Cen. 


*English 10 


Rec. 9 daily, 4 M. W. F. 


13 


Cen. 


^English 11 


Rec. 10 daily, 1 Tu. Th. S. 


13 


Cen. 


^History 24 


Rec. 8 daily 


208 


Cen. 


*Physics 330 


Rec. 9 daily, 3 or 4 daily 


207 


En. H. 




Lab. 10-12 M. W. F. 


210 


En. H. 


*Reading 


Rec. 7 daily 


311 


Cen. 



^College Credit Courses. 

MODEL SCHOOL PROGRAM 

Room 1, Central, Grades First and Third. 

Room 3, Central, Grades Fifth and Eighth. 

Note: Work in the model school begins at 8 o'clock and continues 
until 11; 30. In the lower grades emphasis will be placed upon reading, 



JAN 



L3fl 



M I 



IS. 



38 



language, numbers, busy work. History, geography and nature work 
will be secondary and more or less related to the language and story 
work. 

The work in the upper grades will place greater emphasis upon Eng- 
lish, arithmetic, physiology and geography and will also demonstrate 
the possibilities of work in home economics and agriculture. The rural 
school plan on home economics work will be demonstrated three days 
each work. The work in agriculture will be correlated with the school 
plot at the college and the home project work being carried by the 
pupils. Definite schedule of program is not here given because of the 
necessity of changing the program in order to properly accommodate 
the work for observation purposes. 

SCHEDULE FOR THE SECOND HALF 

Schedule for the second half of the Summer Session is indicated be- 
low. It is thought that this will not need to be modified. At any 
rate, modifications will be made only when students can be better ac- 
commodated. 



COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 
(Second Half) 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


A. Ed. 1 


Rec. 7 daily 


307 Ag. H. 


A. E. 3b 


Rec. 10 daily 


208 


Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 5a 


Rec. 8 daily 


307 Ag. H. 


A. E. 13 


Rec. 1, Lab. 2-5, M. W. F. 


204 


O. A. 


A. E. 21 


Rec. & Lab. 3-5 T. Th. S. 


204 


O. A. 


A. E. 30 


Rec. 9 daily, Lab. 10-12 T. Th. S. 


204 


O. A. 


A. H. 20 


Rec. 11 daily 


109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 42-43 


Rec. 1 daily, 2 Tu. Th. S., Lab. 








2-5 M. W. F. 


110 


C. B. 


Chem. 104 


Rec. 9 daily, 2 M. W. F., Lab. 10-12 
daily 


15 


C. B. 


Econ. 110 


Rec. 9 daily, 11 M. W. F. 


222 


Cen. 


Eng. 10 


Rec. 3 daily, 4 Tu. Th. Sat. 


13 


Cen. 


Eng. 417 


Rec. 2 daily 


13 


Cen. 


F. C. 1 


Rec. 9 daily, Lab. 1-3 M. W. F. 


307 


Ag. H. 


F. C. 2 


Rec. 10 daily, Lab. 3-5 Tu. Th. S. 


306 


Ag. H. 


Hort. 38 


Rec. 8 M. W. F., Lab. 1-3 Tu. Th. S. 


208 


Ag. H. 


Hon. 333 


Rec. 7 daily 


208 


Ag. H. 


M. E. 121 


8-10, 10-12, 1-3, 3-5 


403 


En. H. 


M. E. 140 


Rec. 7 Tu. Th. S., Lab. 8-10, 10-12, 








1-3, 3-5 


203 


En. A. 


M. E. 141 


8-10, 10-12, 1-3, 3-5 


403 


En. H. 


M. E. 181 


8-10, 10-12, 1-3, 3-5 


403 


En. H. 


M. E. 245 


Rec. 7 M. W. F., Lab. 8-10, 10-12, 








1-3, 3-5 


203 


En. A. 


M. E. 331 


8-10, 10-12, 1-3, 3-5 


P. S. 


Physics 330 


As arranged 






Psych. 7 


Rec. 11 daily, 4 Tu. Th. S. 


210 


Cen. 


Psych. 8 


Rec. 9 daily, 4 M. W. F. 


210 


Cen. 


Soils 141 


K.-c X daily, Lab 10-12 daily 


7 Ag. If. 



39 

GENERAL COURSES 

General Agriculture 

Domestic Scienec for rural and grade teachers 

.Domestic Science for Homemakers 

Manual Training 

Education (Didactics) 1, 2, 3 

Check below if you want the above work for the following reason. 
12 weeks work for grades in the new subjects (Agriculture, Do- 



mestic Science and Manual Training) 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Are you a graduate of an accredited High School? 

Do you want a copy of Rural Life Conference Circular ?. 



Do you want camping space (men and families only), .S 

Is this card to be taken as request for advanced registration or sim- Jj 

ply for information? tuo 

g 
Shall we reserve room for you? -^ 

Name "3 

o 

Address (city) w 

County 

State 

The following will be interested in receiving information about the 
Summer Session: 

Name Address 



40 



l,\IFC.../IATiON BLANK 

Prospective students are asked to use this blank in furnishing in- 
formation and in making requests for further information. Cut out 
and mail to the Director of Summer Session, Ames, Iowa. 

Check below the courses in which you are interested. Check subject 
and underscore course number. Check other points also. Do not de- 
lay your inquiry. 

Courses totaling six semester hours, is our recommendation as to 
full time college credit work for each half. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 



.Agricultural Education 1, 2. 3b, 

5a, 7, 8, 10, 21a, 31a, 31b 
.Agricultural Engineering 1, 5, 

13, 19, 21, 30, 36 
.Agricultural Journalism 8, 9 
.Animal Husbandry, 1, 2, 3, 1, 

20 

.Bacteriology 1, 15, 18, 30 
.Botany 161, 470, 560 
.Chemistry 103, 104, 351, 352, 

375, 376, 403, 801 
.Dairy 12, 36 
.Economic Science 110, 

424 

..English 10, 11, 412, 417 
..Farm Crops 1, 2, 33 
..Farm Management 2 
..Forestry 65 



.History 6, 24, 98 
.Home Economics 1, 4, 6, 7, 21a, 
37, 43, 44, 45, 46, 48, 49, 50, 51, 
58, 60, 61, 70 
.Horticulture 3, 38, 333 
.Literature 230, 401 
.Manual Training 121, 140, 141, 
.181, 219, 220, 245, 331, 423, 437 
.Mathematics 30, 40a, 40, 43, 45 
.Mechanical Engineering 401 
.Physical Culture S-l, S-2 
.Physical Training 5 
.Physics 205, 330, 404 
.Poultry, 42, 43 
.Psychology 6, 7, 8 
..Public Speaking, 2, 3, 10 
..Soils 103, 141, 304, 342 



1 can Jilt end only the first half, June 3-July 12 

I can attend only the second half, July 15-Aug. 23. 

I r;m attend either half 

I will attend for- twelve weeks 



I have often thought that we overlook tlae 
fact that the real sources of strength in the com- 
munitvj come from the bottom. Who would have 
looked to see Lincoln save a nation? Who that 
knew Lincoln when he was a lad and a vjouth 
and a vjoung man— hut all the while there was 
springing up in him as if he were connected with 
the verij soil itself, the sap of a nation, the vision 
of a great people, a sumpathvj so ingrained and 
intimate with the common run of men that we 
was like the people impersonated, sublimated, 
touched with genius. And it is to such sources 
that we must alwatjs look. No man can calculate 
the courses of genius, no man can foretell the 
leadership of nations And so we must see to it 
that the bottom is left open; we must see to it 
that the soil of common feeling, of the common 
consciousness, is alwaijs fertile and unclogged, for 
there can he no fruit unless the roots touch the 
rich sources of life. And it seems to me that the 
schoolhouses dotted here, there, and everywhere, 
over the great expanse of this Nation, will some 
dau. prove to he the roots of that great tree of 
libertu which shall spread for the sustenance and 
protection of all mankind. 

— WOODROW WILSON 



THE COLLEGE 



The Iowa State College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts conducts work in five major lines: 

Agriculture, Engineering, 

Home Economics, Industrial Science, 

Veterinary Medicine 



The Graduate Division conducts advanced re- 
search and instruction in all these five lines.* 

Four-year, five-year, and six-year collegiate 
courses are offered in different divisions of the Col- 
lege. Non-collegiate courses are offered in agricul- 
ture, engineering, and home economics. Summer 
Sessions include graduate, collegiate, and non-col- 
legiate work. Short courses are offered in the Winter. 

Extension courses are conducted at various 
points throughout the state. 

Research work is conducted in the Agricultural 
and Engineering Experiment Stations and in the 
Veterinary Research Laboratory. 

Special announcements of the different branch- 
es of the work are supplied, free of charge, on ap- 
plication. The general college catalogue will be 
sent on request. 

Address 



Ames, Iowa 



HERMAN KNAPP 

Registrar 



1/1 



Official Publication of 

Iowa State College of Agriculture 

and Mechanic Arts 



VOL. XVII 



FEBRUARY 5, 1919 



NO. 36 



NINTH ANNUAL 

SUMMER SESSION 

GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
1919 



/^O^y 




U*j, 









'« 



AMES, IOWA 

Published weekly by Iowa St te College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Ames, Iowa. Entered as 
•coml-class matter, and accepted for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act 
of Oct. 3, 1917, authorized Sept. 21. 1918. 



"I would therefore urge that the people continue to 
give generous support to their schools of all grades and 
that the schools adjust themselves as wisely as possible 
to the new conditions to the end that no boy or girl 
shall have less opportunity for education because of the 
war and that the nation may be strengthened as it can 
only be through the right education of all its people." 

WOODROW WILSON. 
(31 July, 1918) 






Official Publication of 

Iowa State College of Agriculture 

and Mechanic Arts 

VOL. XVII FEBRUARY 5, 1 9 19 NO. 36 












NINTH ANNUAL 

SUMMER SESSION 

GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
1919 



AMES, IOWA 

Published weekly by Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Ames, Iowa. Kntered as 
•econd-class matter, and accepted for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 110?, Act. 
of Oct. 3, 1917, authorized Sept. 23. 1918. 



1919 SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR 

Up to June 14 — Advanced Registration. 

June 14, Saturday — Registration, 8:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m. 

June 16, Monday — 8:00 a. m., Registration. 1 :00 p. m., Work begins on 
regular schedule. 

June 17, Tuesday, 5:10 p. m. — General Summer Session Convocation, 
Agricultural Hall. 

June 24-27 — Conference of Teachers of Agriculture. 
Rural Life Conference. 

June 25, 26, 27, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday — Examination for 
county uniform certificate. Room 198, Chemistry Building. 

July 4, Friday — National Holiday. 

July 7-8— Special Lectures by Dr. VV. W. Charters. 

July 14-15 — Special Lectures by Supt. M. G. Clark. 

July 23, Friday, 4:00 p. m. — Close of first half of Summer Session. 



July 24, Monday, 8:00 a. m. — Beginning of second half of Summer Se: 



July 23, 24, 25, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday — Examination lor 
county uniform certificates. Room 317 Agricultural Hall. 

August 27, Wednesday, 4:00 p. m. — Close of Summer Session. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Summer Session work was offered by the Iowa State College for the 
first time in 1911. In that summer a short course extending over two 
weeks was attended by about fifty superintendents and high school teachers 
of the state. Since that time the interest in agriculture and industrial 
subjects has increased tremendously, not only in this state, but throughout 
the United States. At the present time most states require the teach- 
ing of agriculture in the public schools, and in all of the states agricul- 
ture is taught, especially in the high schools. In 1912 the Summer Ses- 
sion was extended to six weeks, and had a total enrollment of 128 students. 
The third Summer Session, 1913, enrolled 225 students. These students 
came from 63 counties of the state and 10 states of the Union. 

The Summer Session in 1914 had a total attendance of 618. The stu- 
dents represented 96 counties in the state, 15 states and 6 foreign countries. 
Eighty-eight per cent of them were teachers in the public schools and not 
in attendance during the regular college year. 

During the last four summers, the enrollment has continued to increase 
and this hearty response on the part of teachers shows clearly the wisdom 
of the legislature in passing the law requiring the teaching of the indus- 
trial subjects in the public schools. Properly organized and in the hands 
of qualified teachers, agriculture, home economics and manual training 
adapt themselves admirably as public school subjects. The subject matter 
is interesting, worth while, and has a useful outcome. 

General Statement. The college always has recognized its special 
responsibility in the training of high school and college teachers of agri- 
culture, manual training, home economics, and the application of science 
to these vocational subjects. 

Teachers in service can be helped best through the Summer Session, 
and in a large measure they have a right to the advantages of the unusual 
equipment of the Iowa State College. This is especially true since the 
legislation requiring the teaching of the industrial subjects in the public 
schools. In the forthcoming Summer Session the excellent facilities of the 
college, as usual, will be available to the fullest extent to those who wish 
to enroll as students. 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

The establishment of vocational education on a large scale through the 
Smith-Hughes bill places an additional responsibility upon the Iowa State 
College, and this responsibility it will endeavor to meet fully. 

The Iowa State College has been authorized as the one institution of 
the state to train teachers of vocational agriculture, and federal funds are 
made available under the Smith-Hughes Vocational Educational Law for 
the support of such training. The course for the training of teachers of 
home economics at the Iowa State College has also been approved by the 
State and Federal Vocational Boards. This means that the Iowa State 
College has new obligations for the training of teachers under the Smith- 
Hughes Law in addition to former obligations imposed by the Nelson 
Amendment to the Morrill Act. 

Who May Properly Attend. On account of the easy conditions of 
entrance, many receive benefit from the Summer Session who do not 
attend during the regular year. The following should be particularly in- 
terested in the Summer Session : 



1. Ale Teachers, or persons expecting to teach next year, may use 
the Summer Session to secure work in the industrial subjects as required 
by recent legislation. Teachers in the elementary schools will find 
profitable work in the Rural and Grade Teachers' Course. High school 
teachers may secure strong work along particular lines as listed under 
college credit courses. 

2. Teachers and Supervisors especially interested in advanced phases 
of Agricultural Education, Home Economics Education, or education in 
Trades and Industry, — • state Supervisors or special teachers of these sub- 
jects under the Smith-Hughes law. 

3.. Superintendents, Principals and Supervisors. The large number 
of superintendents and principals who have been enrolled in the Summer 
Session in the past indicates clearly that it is serving them to good ad- 
vantage, and meeting a special need which they feel for getting acquainted 
with the newer subjects of manual training and agriculture, together with 
courses in agricultural education. An examination of the Iowa Directory 
indicates that agriculture is taught in the high schools of the state by the 
superintendents more often than by any other single group. Beginning 
and advanced courses are offered in the present session in soils, farm 
crops, animal husbandry, dairying, agricultural engineering, horticulture, 
and in the related subjects of rural sociology, agricultural economics, 
agricultural education, botany, bacteriology, etc. The Summer Session 
gives such superintendents and principals an opportunity to secure work 
of a high character under regular college instruction and under favorable 
conditions. 

4. County Superintendents. Six weeks at the Iowa State College 
will be unusually helpful in view of the rapid development of the voca- 
tional and industrial subjects in the schools. 

5. High School Graduates will find an opportunity to start the college 
course. High school graduates who think of entering the Iowa _ State 
College in the fall of 1919 may take advantage of the Summer Session to 
become acquainted with college methods and to secure work towards 
graduation. Increasing numbers are taking advantage of the Summer 
Session for this purpose. 

6. Regular Students in the Iowa State CoeeEGE may make up back 
work, shorten their course by doing advanced work, or increase their 
electives. 

7. Students in other colleges who are interested in the industrial work 
and related lines will find other colleges willing to accept credits made at 
this institution. 

8. Former Graduates may complete the necessary work in psychology 
and agricultural education in order to secure the first grade state certifi- 
cate. 

9. Any Mature Individual who gives evidence of ability to carry the 
work with profit will be admitted without examination, but such individual 
must satisfy the department concerned as to his or her ability to carry 
the work. 

10. Rikal and Vjeeac.e Ministers will find especially valuable help in 
the Rural Life Conference. Bankers, farmers, rural leaders, mothers and 
daughters will find a welcome, an atmosphere of culture and inspiration, 
and practical help for their work. 

11. WOMEN of maturity will find particular help in the homemakers' 
courses offered during the Summer Session. These course's have proved 
popular and have attracted women not only from all parts of Iowa, but 
from all parts of the nation. The war is won, but food conservation 
should continue. 

Conditions of Admission. All students who can profit by the instruc- 
tion offered will be admitted without examination, admission to a partic- 
ular course being satisfactory to the professor in charge. It is presumed 




Lake La Verne is a Campus Beauty Spot 



that all applying for admission have a serious purpose, and are interested 
in the industrial work. College credit will be granted, however, only to 
those who meet standard entrance requirements. 

Studies and Credits. Nearly one hundred fifty college credit studies 
are offered. Fifty-three of these are in agriculture. An average student 
should be able to make nine hours credit during a single half of the 
Summer Session. All courses offered are completed during a single half 
of the Summer Session by increasing the number of recitations per week. 
There are no split courses. A student desiring to carry more than nine 
(or nine and a fraction) hours of college credit work will be required to 
make application for permission to take extra work, application being 
countersigned by the instructors involved. 

Late Entrance. Because of the rapidity with which the work moves 
in a short session, students should enter in time to attend the first session 
of all classes. Work begins at 1 :00 p. m. on Monday, June 16. Courses 
in the new industrial subjects have laboratory periods, and students should 
therefore plan to be present for the first meeting of the class. 

General Courses. In the general courses, students will be given more 
freedom as to the number of hours to be carried. The schedule, however, 
should be reasonable. Experience proves that a schedule that is too heavy 
is unsatisfactory both to the student and to the instructors. 

Special Work. Students wishing to do advanced or other special work 
not announced in this bulletin should communicate at an early date with 
the Director of the Summer Session, or with the professor in whose de- 
partment they wish to work. Consideration may be given to a sufficient 
number of requests, and especially during the summer session of 1919 
students who have become irregular in their courses due to military ser- 



vice will be offered every facility for doing the work which will permit 
them to become regular in their courses. 

Meeting Residence Requirements for a Degree Through Summer 
Session Work. Because of the largely increased attendance at the Sum- 
mer Session, provision has been made for the satisfying of residence 
requirements for a degree on the basis of four Summer Sessions of six 
weeks each. The amount of work required for the degree will need to be 
supplemented by work in absence, or by correspondence. 

Graduate and Research Work which will apply on the higher degrees 
conferred by this institution will again be offered in certain departments 
during the Summer Session. In the recent Summer Sessions there have 
been a goodly number of graduate students from this and other institu- 
tions, who have availed themselves of this opportunity for completing work 
towards the Master's or Doctor's degree. For further details regarding 
the opportunities for advanced work, the requirements for degrees, and 
for copy of the Graduate Catalog, address the Dean of the Graduate 
Division. 

Fees. The single Summer Session fee of $5.00 for each half of the 
session, covers work in all courses with the exception of the Music Depart- 
ment. The fee for less than the full time is $1.00 a week, with $2.00 as 
a minimum; or $1.00 per credit hour for college credit work, with $2.00 
as a minimum. Laboratory fees are indicated in connection with the 
descriptions of the courses. In the Rural and Grade Teachers' Course, 
there are no fees. No fee is charged for attendance at the Rural Life 
Conference. 

Room and Board. Room and board is available in private homes and 
at the college dormitories at prices which are customary throughout Iowa. 
The cafe in Alumni Hall will be open during the entire Summer Session, 
and will be managed on the cafeteria plan. 

Women will arrange for rooms through the regular college committee 
of which the Dean of Women is chairman. The college dormitories will 
be open for women students for board and room. After the dormitories 
are filled, the Dean of Women will assign women to selected houses about 
the campus, where the regular college rules will apply. In the dormitories 
and private homes alike, mattresses only are furnished for the cots, so 
that students should bring a pillow, sheets, pillow cases and an extra 
blanket. 

Rooms for men will be available in private homes and rooming houses 
about the campus. Rooming arrangements for men will be in charge of 
the Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

Expenses. Expenses will vary with the individual. For each half 
the expenses need not exceed $50 or $60, in addition to car fare. This 
makes provision for tuition, room and board for six weeks, books and 
laundry, and other incidentals. 

Certificates. Students satisfactorily completing any of the general 
courses offered in the Summer Session will, upon request, be given a cer- 
tificate showing attendance and grades. 

The State Board of Educational Examiners will grant five-year, first- 
grade certificates to graduates of the Iowa State College or other ap- 
proved colleges who have completed (a) six semester-hours of psy- 
chology, and (b) fourteen hours of education. The courses offered in 
the Summer Session enable students to meet these requirements. 

Teachers' Examination. The State Teachers' examination for June 
and July will be held at the college during the Summer Session for the 
convenience of the teachers in attendance. One expecting to take an ex- 
amination at the college should bring with him a statement from the 
county superintendent, together with county superintendent's receipt show- 
ing payment of fee, which will admit to the examination. Where such 







A Stock Judging Contest (High School, 1918) 



fee has not been previously paid it will be collected and forwarded to the 
county superintendent. 

The Appointment Committee. In order to better serve the schools 
of the state, the faculty has provided a regular Appointment Committee, 
the duties of which are to assist the students of the College who desire to 
enter educational work in finding positions for which they are best fitted, 
and to aid school officials in finding the teachers, principals, supervisors 
and superintendents best prepared for the positions to be filled. Students 
of the Summer Session, who intend to teach or wish to better their po- 
sitions, may register with this committee. Blanks which are provided for 
that purpose may be secured by calling at the office of the Director of the 
Summer Session, Room 318, Agricultural Hall. No fee is charged for the 
services of this committee. 

Chapel. Chapel services are held once each week at a convenient hour 
and all students are expected to attend. This is more or less in the 
nature of a convocation as well as a chapel service, and furnishes oppor- 
tunity for announcements or for brief remarks upon subjects of immediate 
interest. 

Each Sunday evening, vesper services are held from 6:15 to 6:45 at the 
campanile when the weather is favorable. In case of inclement weather, 
the meeting is held in Agricultural Assembly. 

Students' Mail. Students will avoid inconvenience by having their 
mail addressed, temporarily at least, to Station A, Ames, Iowa. This 
postoffice is located upon the College campus, and mail may be called for 
conveniently. 

Summer Employment. Students coming for the short Summer Ses- 
sion are not advised to seek employment, but to give their full time to 
school work. This is particularly urged in the case of teachers desiring 
to have the grades in agriculture, home economics and manual training 
transferred direct to the certificate. 

There are usually some summer calls for help. Students may learn of 
these calls through the Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

Recreation. While the primarv object of the Summer Session is work 
and study, yet these will be facilitated by a sufficient amount of recrea- 
on. Students are urged to effect organizations and to arrange for tourn- 
aments in tennis, baseball, track, or indoor work. The Committee on 



Games and Recreation will encourage and help in organizing the details of 
this work. 

Tenting Privilege. The privilege of tenting in the north woods will 
be continued this summer. There is no charge for tenting space, but the 
space is limited. It will be well to arrange in advance for the privilege. 
Tents may be brought along or rented of tenting companies. 

Special Features. One feature of the Summer Session which is par- 
ticularly worth while is the opportunity to hear educators of national repu- 
tation. The policy of selecting a limited number of men whose addresses 
no one can afford to miss will be continued this year. These lectures for 
the most part are scheduled for the evening; occasionally, however, at 
5 :00 o'clock. The following can be announced at the present time : 

Dr. W. W. Charters, College of Education, University of Illinois. 

W. G. Hummel, Assistant Federal Director of Vocational Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C. 

M. G. Clark, Superintendent of Schools, Sioux City, Iowa. 

The Model School. The popular two-room, consolidated Model School 
will be continued in charge of competent critic teachers. Regular work 
in observation and methods will be offered for students in the general 
courses, and the work of the model school will be used in the regular col- 
lege courses in agricultural education. The Model School provides the 
laboratory opportunity for demonstrating educational methods. 

Library. The library of the Iowa State College is well selected and it 
is so managed as to make it serviceable to all students during the Summer 
Session. 

Equipment. The equipment of the Iowa State College for work in 
agriculture, home economics, manual training, and related subjects is in 
keeping with the wealth and resources of the state. In many respects, 
the Summer Session is the best season of the year for studying agri- 
culture, and the regular college instructors in charge of the work use 
freely the resources of the college and the experiment station. 

Location. Ames is almost at the geographical center of the state of 
Iowa, on the main line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad. It is 
about thirty-five miles north of Des Moines, with which it is connected 
by a branch line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad and by the Fort 
Dodge, Des Moines and Southern (interurban) running from Fort Dodge 
and Rockwell City to Des Moines. A branch of the Chicago & North- 
western from Ames penetrates the northern part of the state. Ames is 
proverbially a clean town, having no saloons or billiard halls. 

Students should plan to arrive on Saturday or Monday. In case it 
is absolutely necessary to arrive on Sunday, advanced notice should be 
given, with the request that rooms be arranged for, at least temporarily. 
In case of arrival on Sunday, without advanced notice, phone 652, the 
residence phone of the Director of the Summer Session. 

CONFERENCES 

Rural Life Conference. The dates for the Rural Life Conference 
this year are June 24th to June 27th inclusive. 

In the past, this conference has been most helpful to Iowa and neigh- 
boring slates in stimulating and developing rural leadership. Speakers 
of note from state and nation will appear before the conference. 

The lectures in the Rural Life Conference are free to Summer Session 
Students, as well as members of the Conference. For special bulletin 
giving detailed program of the Conference, write Dean Chas. F. Cnrti^s, 
Chairman of the Rural Life Conference Committee, or the Director of 
the Snnnner Session. 

Summer Conference for Garden Club Leaders. A conference for 
Garden Club Leaders has been arranged to be held at the Iowa State Col- 
lege from July 7tb to lXtb inclusive. In tins conference one-ball" <la\ 










Agronomy Experimental Farm 

will be given over to actual work with soils and plants in the gardens, and 
with the children who are Garden Club Members ; the other half day will 
be given over to conferences and to the consideration of special problems, 
insects, diseases and club management. A garden cared for by Garden 
Club members is to be arranged for on the college grounds. Gardens in 
connection with the children's homes, both in town and in the country, 
will be made use of during this conference. 

Conference cf Teachers of Agriculture. Under the direction of Pro- 
fessor W. H. Bender, State Director of Vocational Education, a confer- 
ence of teachers of agriculture, superintendents, and others directly inter- 
ested in better agricultural courses in public schools, will be held at the 
College June 24 to 27, inclusive. Professor Bender will be in direct charge 
of the conference and will participate by giving help to interested super- 
intendents and teachers on the requirements of the Smith-Hughes Law 
relating to agriculture. Professor J. A. Linke, Regional Director of the 
Federal Board, and Professor W. G. Hummell, Federal Director of Voca- 
tional Agriculture, as well as a number of the Iowa State College faculty, 
will participate in the conference. School boards are urged to send their 
superintendents, as well as the teachers of agriculture, to this conference. 

Motion Picture and Lantern Slide Projection. If there is sufficient 
demand, a series of lectures and demonstrations will be given, covering 
the fundamentals of picture projection, including a study of mechanisms, 
optical systems, slides, film and the inspection, care and repair of same. 

The course is intended for those teachers who wish to become more 
profficient in the use of stereopticons and motion picture apparatus in 
their schools. First meeting, Fridav, June 20, 5 p. m., Room 117, Agri- 
cultural Hall. 



LEGAL PROVISIONS OF INTEREST TO TEACHERS 

A large part of the work offered in the Summer Session is arranged in 
direct response to recent legislation. Work is therefore arranged to meet 
legal requirements. The laws of the state encouraging work in agricul- 
ture, home economics and manual training are in common with similar 
'aws throughout the entire United States. The movement for the indus- 



10 



trial work in the schools is not local nor is it transitory. It is gathering 
force each year. It is simply the recognition of the fact that education to 
be effective must be connected up directly with the work and dominant 
interests of the people. The government census shows that 68% of the 
people of Iowa are rural and that 49.2% are actually living upon farms. 
This makes agriculture the one dominant occupation of the state. For 
women, of course, home economics is the one great interest, but women 
living on the farm are almost equally interested in farm operations. While 
Iowa is not a large manufacturing state at present, the output of its fac- 
tories is increasing steadily each year. Industry in one form or another 
takes most of the time of every one and there is no reason why our educa- 
tion should not connect up more and more with industry. It should put 
joy and satisfaction as well as scientific insight into all industrial and 
manual occupations. 

Any county superintendent can instruct teachers as to the legal require- 
ments or the requirements of the State Educational Board of Examiners 
with reference to the new subjects. Rural teachers taking work in agri- 
culture, home economics or manual training may have the grades in these 
subjects transferred direct to the certificate on completion of twelve 
weeks of work, but the work for rural and grade teachers this year does 
not lead to a certificate for twelve weeks of normal training. Agriculture, 
home economics and manual training are the subjects in which the Iowa 
State College of all institutions is prepared to help teachers. 



OFFICERS AND FACULTY 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 



D. D. Murphy, President, Elkader. 

\\ . C. Stuckslager, Lisbon. 

Geo. T. Baker, Davenport. 

Paul E. Stillman, Jefferson. 

Frank P. Jones, Villisca. 

P. K. Holbrook, Onawa. 

Chas. R. Brenton, Dallas Center. 

Edw. P. Schoentgen, Council Bluffs. 

H. M. Eicher, Washington. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

W. R. Boyd, Chairman, Cedar Rapids. 

Thomas Lambert, Sabula. 

W. H. Gemmill, Secretary, Des Moines. 

AUDITOR AND INSPECTOR 

Jackson W. Bowdish, Auditor and Accountant, Ames. 
John E. Foster, Inspector, Des Moines. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

Raymond A. Pearson, President. 

E. W. Stanton, Vice-president, Central Building. 

G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session, Agricultural Hall. 

Herman Knapp, Treasurer and Registrar, Central Building. 

SUMMER SESSION COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, President. 

C. F. Curtiss, Dean of Agriculture. 

Anson Marston, Dean of Engineering. 

R. E. Buchanan, Dean of Industrial Science. 

Catherine J. MacKay, Dean of Home Economics. 

G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session. 

PROFESSORS 

P. E. Brown Soils 

Robert Earle Buchanan Bacteriology 

Orange Howard Cessna Psychology 

W. F. Coover Chemistry 

H. H. Kildee Animal Husbandry 

G. B. MacDonald Forestry 

I. E. Melhus Botany 

H. B. Munger Farm Management 

A. B. Noble English 

E. G. Nourse Economic Science 

Louis Hermann Pammel Botany 

Frcdrica Shattuck Public Speaking 

William Henry Stevenson Soils 

H. W. Vaughan Animal Husbandry 

G. M. Wilson Agricultural Education 



12 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 



Ross L. Bancroft 
Archibald A. Bailey 
Iva Brandt 
F. E. Brown 
W. F. Cramer 
Myrtle Ferguson 
C. C. Fowler 

F. M. Harrington 
William Ray Heckler 
H. S. Judkins 

Wm. Kunerth 
A. C. McCandlish 
Clyde McKee 
C. W. Mayser 
Cora B. Miller 

G. C. Morbeck 
E. A. Pattengill 
H. J. Plagge 

P. S. Shearer 

G. W. Snedecor 

R. S. Stephenson 

Harold Stiles 

George H. Von Tungeln 

T. F. Vance 

J. A. Wilkinson 



Soils 

Music 

Home Economics 

Chemistry 

Agricultural Education 

Home Economics 

Chemistry 

Horticulture 

Farm Crops 

Dairy 

Physics 

Dairy Husbandry 

Farm Crops 

Physical Training 

Home Economics 

Forestry 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Animal Husbandry 

Mathematics 

Animal Husbandry 

Physics 

Economic Science 

Psychology 

Chemistry 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 



\i 


ola 


Bell 


A. 


B. 


Caine 


Louis 


De Vries 


Ch 


as. 


H. Dorchester 


E. 


E. 


Eastman 


\I 


D. 


Helser 


W 


T 


Ide 


k. 


Q. 


McFarland 


N. 


A. 


Morriam 


II. 


R. 


O'Brien 


o. 


A 


Olson 


Ra 


vmond Rogers 


D. 


L. 


Scoles 


I',. 


P. 


Stonecifcr 


11 


II 


Waltcr 



Home Economics 

Animal Husbandry 

Modern Language 

Farm Crops 

Soils 

Animal Husbandry 

Manual Training, Trade & Industry 

Manual Training, Trade and Industry 

Physical Training 

Agricultural Journalism 

Mechanical Engineering 

Physical Training 

Chemistry 

Horticulture 

Physical Training 



INSTRUCTORS 



Mrs. I). A. Arville 
I )eane G. Carter 
Ruth Cessna 
Clarissa Clark 

I. L. Eason 

1 [enry Giese 

II. F. Hertz 
Margarel Kingery 
Lillis Knapoenberge 
Maude McCormick 
A. F. Nickels 



Modern Language 

Agricultural Engineering 

Chemistry 

Bacteriology 

English 

Manual Training, Trade & Industry 

Agricultural Engineering 

Home Economics 

I Tome Economics 

English 

Machine: Shop 



13 



Edith Palmer 
Kan Peterson 

E. C. Potter 

F. F. Sherwood 
1 [elen F. Smith 
D. P. Weeks 



Home Economics ' 
Physical Culture 
Pattern Shop 
Chemistry 
Mathematics 
Agricultural Engineering 



Vera M. Dixon 
Gladys Rush 
Amy Winslow 



LIBRARY 



Assitant Librarian 

Head of Readers' Department 

Reference Librarian 



Margaret Noble 



LABORATORY ASSISTANTS 
Home Economics 



SPECIALS 

D. W. Hamilton Agricultural Education 

Professor of Vocational Education, MacDonald College, Quebec. 
Gertrude Dennison Grade Critic Teacher 

Grade Supervisor, Sioux City Schools. 
Arthur F. Payne Vocational Education 

Director of Vocational Education, Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 
K. G. Smith Manual Training, Trades and Indus- 

try 

Regional Director of Trade and Industrial Education for the Federal 
Vocational Board. 
Bertha C. Stiles Primary Critic 

Primary Supervisor, Cedar Falls, Iowa. 



COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 

The courses described below are the same as those offered during the 
college year and will be taught by the regular college faculty. The de- 
scriptions are quoted from the regular college catalog. 

Other courses may be offered when requested by a sufficient number of 
students. Students who have become irregular due to military service, 
food production, manufacture of munitions, or other causes incident to 
the war will be given every opportunity possible to make up their work 
during the Summer Session. Some special classes will be organized for 
this purpose. 

As the Summer Session is approximately one-half the length of a col- 
lege quarter, the number of hours per week devoted to a course in the 
Summer Session will be two times what is shown in the descriptions 
below. Nine hours per week constitutes full work in the college courses. 
There is little doubt but that the numbers wanting each course will justify 
offering it. 

A resolution adopted by the Iowa Council of Education indicated about 
forty-eight quarter hours of technical agriculture of a college grade as the 
minimum for a regular teacher of agriculture in the high school. This 
amount of work will easily be secured in successive Summer Sessions. 
The work in agriculture offered during the summer of 1919 includes ad- 
ditional courses to meet further demands for agriculture. The prospec- 
tive student who is looking forward to several Summer Sessions in suc- 
cession is advised to plan his work so as to cover the field in a reasonable 
manner and meet the minimum requirements as suggested by the Iowa 
Council of Education. 

The regular amount of work for a single Summer Session will enable 
one to secure eighteen hours of agriculture and this will meet require- 
ments in some schools. Any combination of animal husbandry, agricul- 
tural engineering, dairy, farm crops, farm management, poultry, horti- 
culture, or soils, would be acceptable and all of this is the right type of 
agricultural work for the prospective high school teacher. The reasonably 
small units of specialized work are considered much more desirable than 
courses in general agriculture. The schedule is so arranged as to avoid 
conflict and enable the student to carry the full amount of agriculture 
during the first and second halves of the summer school. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

51. Methods of Teaching Vocational Subjects. The teacher of the 
newer industrial and vocational subjects needs especially to be prepared 
in methods of teaching. This course, while covering many of the stand- 
ard topics under methods of teaching, is adapted throughout for the 
teacher of industrial and vocational subjects. 

Recitations 3; credit 3. 

53. The Industrial High School. The sources and development of 
the high school curriculum, with particular reference to the industrial 
and vocational subjects. 

Recitations 3 ; credil 3. 

54. Principles of Vocational Education. The newer subjects in the 
curriculum have greatly influenced the relative emphasis on the various 
principles underlying education. A thorough understanding of the funda 
mental principles of education is especially necessary for the teacher oi 



15 

the newer subjects who is in particular need of perspective with reference 
to aims and values in education. 
Recitations 3; credit 3. 

55b. History of Industrial and Vocational Education. The history 
of education with reference to its bearing upon the solution of present 
educational problems, especially problems of industrial and vocational 
education. It is a redirected study designed to be of real value to our 
students. Chief emphasis upon the modern movement. 

Recitations 3 ; credit 3. 

57 Vocational Education. Development and present best practice 
with reference to vocational education, pre-vocational education, and vo- 
cational guidance. 

Recitations 3 ; credit 3. 

58. Rural Education. Rural education with particular reference to 
the interests of the county superintendent, the normal training teacher, 
and the superintendent or teacher in the consolidated or village school. 

Recitations 3 ; credit 3. 

109b. School Administration and Supervision. The teacher of agri- 
culture is constantly being used in the consolidated and smaller town sys- 
tems of the state as principal or superintendent. It is necessary, therefore, 
that the special teacher of agriculture have the opportunity of becoming 
acquainted with modern methods of administration and supervision. 

Recitations 3 ; credit 3. 

S-121a. Training in Teaching Home Economics. This course is a 
Summer Session adaptation of the regular course in special methods and 
practice teaching. It is planned for teachers of home economics in grades 
and high school*. It includes a study of the choice of suitable subject 
matter, method of presentation, equipment, illustrative material and a 
comparison of the more recent text books designed for grade and high 
school classes. Special emphasis will be placed upon the planning of work 
in home economics for vocational schools in which foods may be pre- 
pared in large quantities in connection with the school lunch room, or 
where courses in dressmaking and millinery lead directly to trade work. 

Recitations 3; credit 3. 

131 a, b, or c. Teaching Agriculture. Course of study; lesson plans; 
observation and supervised teaching. Prerequisite Vocational Education 
51 and 52, and agriculture equal to that required for the completion of the 
Junior year in some agricultural course. 

Recitations 2; lab. 1; credit 3 each. 

S. 131a. Vocational Agriculture. Organization and supervision of Voca- 
tional Agriculture under the Smith-Hughes law from the standpoint of 
the state supervisor of vocational agriculture. 

Lectures and discussion 2; credit 2. 

S-142. Administration of Industrial Education. Organization and 
supervision of vocational industrial education under the Smith-Hughes 
Law from the standpoint of the teacher, city supervisor, or state super- 
visor of vocational industrial education. 

Lectures and discussions 2 ; credit 2. 

AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISM 

28a. Beginning Technical Journalism. The fundamentals of jour- 
nalistic writing. Lectures on news, news values and news style, with 
practice in news gathering and writing and the application of the princi- 
ples involved to agricultural, engineering, home economics or other in- 
formational writing. Prerequisites, English 40a, b, c. 

Recitations 3 ; credit 3. 



16 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

51. Forge Shop. Forging and welding iron and steel. Making, hard- 
ening and tempering small tools. Work designed to be helpful in repair 
of farm equipment. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 2. Fee $3.00. 

55. Advanced Forge Work. The repair and care of agricultural 
equipment including plow share work, autogenic welding, forging of 
special farm equipment and tools. For prospective teachers. 

Prerequisite 51 ; Lab 2, 3 hr. Credit 2. Fee $3.00. 

60. Farm Machinery and Farm Motors. Mechanics and materials; 
study of the construction, adjustment, operation and testing of farm ma- 
chinery and farm motors ; measurement and transmission of power. 

Prerequisite, Physics 101. Rec. 3, Lab. 1, 3-hr. Credit 4. Fee $2.00. 

61. Gas Engines and Tractors. Study and practice to familiarize the 
student with the construction, operation, adjustment, and care of gasoline 
and oil engines and tractors. 

Prerequisite 60. Rec. 1 ; Lab. 2, 3-hr. Credit 3. Fee $2.50. 

70. Farm Buildings. Planning of farm buildings with regard to econ- 
omy, appearance, sanitation, cost and convenience ; materials, their strength 
and adaptability. Laboratory work ; making plans and estimating costs. 
For agricultural students. 

Prerequisite 80. Rec. 2; Lab. 1, 3-hr. Credit 3. 

74. Concrete and Masonry. Materials for making concrete ; specifi- 
cations and tests; study of mixtures, forms, reinforcement; uses of con- 
crete on the farm. Other fireproof building materials. 

Lecture 1 ; Lab. 1, 3-hr. Credit 2. Fee $2.00 . 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

101. Types and Market Classes of Beef and Dual-Purpose Cattle. 
Judging; study of types, carcasses, markets, and market classifications. 

Recitations and labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 2; fee $1.00. 

102. Types and Market Classes of Sheep and Horses. Similar to 
101, but with sheep and horses. 

Recitations and labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 2; fee $1.00. 

103. Types and Market Classes of Dairy Cattle and Hogs. Simi- 
lar to 101, but with dairy cattle and hogs. 

Recitations and labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 2; fee $1.00. 

111. Breeds of Beef and Dual-Purpose Cattle. Judging representa- 
tives of different breeds according to their official standards ; study of 
the origin, history, type, and adaptability of the breeds. 

Prerequisite 101 ; lectures 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 3h; fee $1.00. 

112. Breeds of Sheep and Horses. Similar to 111, but with sheep 
and horses. 

Prerequisite 102; lectures 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 3&; fee $1.00. 

113. Breeds of Dairy Cattle and Hogs. Similar to 111, but with 
dairy cattle and hogs. 

Prerequisite 103; lectures 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 3 : \ ; fee $1.00. 

241. Animal Feeding. The digestion of food, composition and digest- 
ibility of feeding stuffs; preparation of feeds; feeding standards and the 
calculation of rations; the feeding of horses. 

Prerequisite Chem. 751 or 821; recitations 3; credit 3. 

400. General Poultry Husbandry. Various kinds of poultry pro- 
ducts ordinarily produced for sale, with reference to their relative import" 
ance and opportunities for their production; characteristics of important 
classes and breeds of poultry; judging, breeding, housing, diseases, sani- 
tation, and marketing. 

Recitation 3; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 4; fee $2.00. 



17 




.: i', ; ' 



. 






Judging Sheep 



402. General Poultry Husbandry. 

feeding, incubation, and brooding. 
Prerequisite 400; recitation 1; lab. 1, 



Continuation of 400, and includes 
2 hr.; credit If; fee $2.00. 



BACTERIOLOGY AND HYGIENE 

3. General Bacteriology. Morphology, classification, physiology and 
cultivation of bacteria; relation of bacteria to health of man, animals and 
plants, to infection, contagion, immunity and to other scientific, industrial 
and agricultural problems. Laboratory work on methods of cultivating 
bacteria and the study of bacterial functions and activities, bacterial con- 
tent of water and food, with interpretation of results reached. 

Prerequisite Organic Chemistry; lectures 3; labs. 3 to 9 hrs. ; credit 4 
to 6; fee $5.00. 

A. Primarily for students in Animal Husbandry, and emphasizing 
the relationship of bacteria to animal disease. 

Lectures 3 ; labs. 6 hrs. ; credit 5. 

B. Primarily for students in Agriculture, Farm Crops and Soils, and 
Farm Management, emphasizing the agricultural applications of bac- 
teriology. 

Lectures 3; labs. 6 hrs.; credit 5. 

C. Primarily for students in Dairying, Industrial Science and Indus- 
trial Chemistry. 

Lectures 3; labs. 6 to 9 hrs.; credit 5. 

4. Household Bacteriology. Bacteria in their relations to the prob- 
lems of the home and community, including a brief consideration of the 
pathogenic forms and the bacteria, yeasts and molds in their fermentative 
activities. 

Lectures 3; lab. 6 hrs.; credit 5; fee $5.00. 

31. Research in General or Systematic Bacteriology. 

A. For undergraduates. Credit 2 to 5 ; fee $5.00. 

B. For graduates. Credit 1 to 10; fee $5.00. 

BOTANY 

135. Plant Morphology. First part; structure of the higher plants; 
purpose, to support the work in home economics and agriculture. Second 
part: different -plant groups: purpose, to make clear plant evolution, and 
to lav a basis for the study of bacteriology and plant pathology. 

Recitation 1; lab. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 21; fee $2.00. 

320. General Plant Pathology. A study of the more important di- 
seases of field, orchard and forest crops, as smuts, rusts and mildews, 
with reference to their nature and causes, and an introduction to the prin- 



18 

ciples and practices of disease control. This course will also meet the 
needs of the science or agricultural teacher. 

Recitations 2, labs. 3, 3 hr. ; credit 5. 

415. Systematic Spermatophytes. Flowering plants; historical sur- 
vey of various systems of classification ; study of groups by means of 
some representatives. Field work essential. Specially suited for high 
school teachers. 

Recitations 2; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 4; fee $3.00. 

609. Research. Special advanced research courses are offered in Gen- 
eral Botany, Plant Pathology and Plant Morphology, including such sub- 
jects as Diseases of Special Crops; Weeds of the Farm and Garden; 
Special Research Problems in Morphology. 

CHEMISTRY 

502. General Chemistry. Principles and the non-metallic elements. 
Recitations 3 ; labs. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 4 ; deposit $6.00. 

503. General Chemistry. Metallic elements. 
Recitations 3; labs. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 4; deposit $6.00. 

504. Qualitative Analysis. Tests for and separation of the common 
metallic and non-metallic ions. 

Recitations 2; labs. 3, 2 hr. ; credit 4; deposit $7.50. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

751. Applied Organic Chemistry. Physical and chemical properties 
and methods of preparation of important classes of organic compounds, 
the composition of plant and animal bodies, the proximate principles of 
foods, the chemical changes which occur during digestion and the ele- 
ments of nutrition. 

(a) Prerequisite 504; recitations 3; lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 3§ ; deposit 
$6.00. 

(b) Continuation of 751a. Prerequisite 751a; recitations 3; lab. 1, 2 
hr. ; credit 3§ ; deposit $6.00. 

752. Agricultural Analysis. Principles of gravimetric and volumetric 
analysis, the analysis of milk, grain, mill feeds and fodders. 

Prerequisite 751b; recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 3J ; deposit $7.50. 

HOUSEHOLD CHEMISTRY 

375. Applied Organic Chemistry. Consideration of organic chem- 
istry with special reference to home economics. Study, estimation and 
preparation of some of the more important compounds. Serves as a 
foundation for food and physiological chemistry. 

(a) Prerequisite qualitative analysis; recitations 3; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 
4.' : ; deposit $7.50. 

(b) Prerequisite 375a; recitations 3; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 4 : \ ; deposit 
$7.50. 

376. Food Chemistry. Consideration of constituents entering into the 
composition of foods. Methods of analysis of milk, butter, oleomargarine, 
ice cream, cereal foods. Detection of coloring matters and food preserv- 
atives. 

Prerequisite 375a; recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 3 : \ ; deposit $7.50. 

PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY AND NUTRITION 

802. Physiological Chemistry and Nutrition. For home economic 
Students and others who desire to obtain a thorough grounding in the 
principles of physiological chemistry. The organic and inorganic food- 
mil- are studied, particular attention being directed to their digestion 
and assimilation. In this connection, special consideration is given to the 

a< iion -,i enzymes. 






19 

Prerequisite organic chemistry and quantitative analysis; recitations 3; 
labs. 3, 2 hr. ; credit 5 hrs. ; deposit $7.50. 

RESEARCH 

901. (a) Inorganic Chemistry; (b) Analytical Chemistry; (c) Physical 
Chemistry; (d) Agricultural Chemistry; (e) Physiological Chemistry 
and Nutrition; (f) Organic Chemistry. As arranged. 

DAIRY 

15. Farm Dairying. Secretion, composition, testing, separation and 
acidity of milk, preparation of starters, ripening of cream, and churning 
and packing butter. 

Recitations 3; lecture and lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 4; fee $3.00. 

65. Domestic Dairying. Nutritive and economical value of milk; its 
dietetics and hygiene ; market milk, infants' milk, invalids' milk, cream, 
ice cream, condensed milk, malted milk, dried milk, fermented milks 
(Kephir, Koumiss), buttermilk, butter and cheese. Demonstrations are 
given in types of butter and cheese, and in testing the purity of milk and 
butter. 

Recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 2§ ; fee $2.50. 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE 

51. Elementary Economics for Women. A course in the elementary 
principles of economics required of all students in the Division of Home 
Economics. 

Recitations 3 ; credit 3. 

120. Introduction to Agricultural Economics. An elementary study 
of the economic forces and institutions with which the farmer is con- 
cerned. This course presupposes a knowledge of History 124 or its 
equivalent. 

Recitations 3 ; credit 3. 

315. Rural Sociology. Rural social life and means to its improve- 
ment ; social forces and factors affecting the quantity and quality of the 
rural population ; institutions, and organizations ; comparison of the coun- 
try with city as regards birth-rate, death-rate, longevity, marriage, divorce, 
criminality, leadership, standards of morality, standards of living, thrift, 
public opinion, etc. 

Recitations 3 ; credit 3. 

ENGLISH 

19. Introductory College Course. Structure of the sentence and of 
the paragraph. Daily paragraph themes. The purpose is to teach the 
student correctness, force, and ease in sentence structure and orderliness 
in the arrangement of thought. 

Recitations 3; credit 3; will be accepted as substitutes for 40a, 140a, or 
240a. 

20. Exposition. Principles and methods of expositor}' writing; 
logical basis in definition and division ; different types of exposition, with 
study of models ; careful attention to the construction of paragraphs and 
the making of plans and outlines ; a short theme almost daily, with longer 
ones occasionally, constant emphasis on the application of the principles 
studied. 

Recitations 3; credit 3; will be accepted as substitute for 40b (19), 140b 
(116) if supplemented by additional work, or 240b (220). 

21. Narration and Description. Expository and suggestive de- 
scription ; better vocabulary through search for the specific word ; simple 
and complex narrative, with incidental description; plot and characteriza- 
tion ; securing interest, as well as clearness and good order; analysis of 



20 

good models. Themes almost daily, to train the student to apply the 
principles studied. 

Recitations 3 ; credit 3 ; will be accepted as substitute for 40c, 140c, or 
240c. 

251a. Masterpieces, English. Brief survey of English literature 
from Shakespeare to Wordsworth; more detailed study of the Vic- 
torian period, with special attention to the work of one essayist, one poet, 
and one novelist. 

Recitations 3; credit 3. 

430a. The American Short-story; setting, plot, and characters; tone 
and style ; purpose to give familiarity with the more important short-story 
writers of the U. S., and to establish standards of taste in order to 
guide the students in later reading and to give increased enjoyment. 

Recitations 3 ; credit 3. 

441. Argumentation. The two methods, the inductive and the de- 
ductive, of drawing inferences and establishing truth ; how to detect 
fallacies and how to guard against them ; abstracting, collating, and clas- 
sifying arguments on both sides of some live question of present im- 
portance ; organizing a large mass of material and developing it into a 
logical brief ; analysis of good models ; writing f orensics. 

Recitations 3 ; credit 3 ; may be substituted for 443. 

FARM CROPS 

151. Corn Production. Structure and adaptation of the corn plant; 
methods of selecting, storing, testing, grading, planting, cultivating and 
harvesting. Cost of production, uses of the crop, commercial marketing, 
insects and diseases. Field study of corn with reference to per cent stand 
and correlation of the parts of the stalk. Laboratory study of the struc- 
ture of the stalk, ear, and kernel. Scoring and judging of single and ten 
ear samples. 

Recitations 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 4; fee $1.50. 

152. Small Grain Production. Oats, wheat, barley and rye; their 
botanical structure, soil and climatic adaptations, seed selection, seed bed 
preparation and seeding, harvesting and uses ; insects and diseases. Lab- 
oratory study of plants of each small grain crop; scoring, judging, and 
market grading of the different grains. 

Recitations 3; lab. 1, 3 hrs. ; credit 4; fee $1.50. 

153. Corn and Small Grain Judging. Judging samples of the differ- 
ent varieties of corn and small grain; market grain grading; also the 
origin, characteristics, and adaptations of the standard grain varieties. 

Prerequisites 151 and 152; recitations 2 and lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee 
$2.00. 

154. Forage Crop Production. Grasses, legumes, and other forage 
plants suitable for pasture, hay, silage and soiling. Botanical structure, 
soil and climatic adaptation, cultural and harvesting methods and uses of 
the different forage plants. Identification of the plants, their seed, and the 
< ommon adulterants. 

Prerequisites 151 and 152; recitations 3; lab. 1, 3 hrs.; credit 4; fee $2.00. 

160. Summer Course. Corn, small grains, grasses, and legumes; 
habits of early growth, structure, rate of growth, reproduction, variation, 
correlations, effect of different methods of planting. Experiment Station 
methods. 

Prerequisites 151 and 152; bibs. 6 hrs. daily for 3 weeks or 3 hrs. daily 
for 6 weeks; credit 5; fee $5.00. 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

22. Farm Management. Farming as a business; factors controlling 
lb' uccess of farming as found in farm surveys; types of farming; farm 









21 




Summer Students in the Farm Crops Laboratory 



layout, forms of tenure and leases, organization and management of suc- 
cessful farms. 

Lectures and recitations 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 4; fee $1.00. 

FORESTRY 

Summer School Work in Forestry. The following courses in For- 
estry, Nos. 76, 77, 78, and 79, will not be given on the college campus but 
in the Forestry summer camp. This year the camp will be established 
during one session in a timbered portion of Iowa; the second session will 
be held either in the timbered regions of Minnesota or Colorado. In 
these courses the student is given practice in various field operations in- 
cluding systems of measuring trees and stands, preparing topographic, 
type, stand and other maps for use in forest management. Open to tech- 
nical forestry students or other students qualified to carry the work. 

76. Applied Lumbering. Logging and milling operations, including 
a detailed study of each operation in the production of lumber. Tools 
and machines used, and costs of operations. The consideration of a speci- 
fied tract of timber for logging; location of camps, roads, railroads, 
chutes. Equipment necessary, and estimated cost of each operation. A 
study which is made during the summer forestry camp. Field work, 5 
3-hr. periods; credit 5. 

77. Camp Technique. Personal equipment for camp life; camp and 
cooking equipment. Camp food. Ration lists for trips of different kinds. 
Useful knots. Practice in throwing various packing hitches. Emergency 
equipment in case of sickness or accident. First aid practice. Lectures 
and field practice during the summer forestry camp. Credit 3. 

78. Forest Mensuration. Scaling logs; determination of the volume 
of other forest products, and the reconnaissance of timbered areas. Com- 
plete reconnaissance of a specified area, including the running of primary 
and secondary base lines, the estimating and mapping of the timber by 
types, the making of contour maps, the writing of forest descriptions bv 
watersheds, etc. Summer Camp. Field work 5 3-hr. periods ; credit 5. 

79. Field Silviculture. Forest types; factors determining each. Type 
mapping. Natural reproduction of the forest under varying conditions. 
Improvement cuttings. Marking timber for cutting with reference to the 
silvicultural systems. Work of this course consists entirely of field work. 
Summer camp. Field work 5 3-hr. periods ; credit 5. 



22 

HISTORY 

27. Economic History of Modern Europe. A study of the economic 
development of modern Europe from 1815 to the present. Special atten- 
tion given to the industrial revolution in England ; the effect of the 
Napoleonic wars upon European agriculture and manufactures ; spread of 
the factory system into Belgium, France, and Germany ; the development 
of railways and canals ; the expansion of over seas trade ; the rise of 
socialism and labor organizations ; the European tariff ; the growth of 
industrial concentration ; economic causes and problems of the European 
War; and the probable effect of the war on agriculture, industry, and com- 
merce. 

Recitations 3 ; credit 3. 

124. Economic History of American Agriculture. A preliminary 
survey of the economic history of American agriculture as a field for in- 
vestigation, followed by a study of colonial agriculture ; the westward 
movement of pioneer and planter into the Mississippi Valley ; the agrarian 
revolution and the opening of the far West ; and the reorganization of 
the agricultural industry. Special attention given to the origin, growth, 
control and disposition of the public domain; the settlement of the West; 
the influences affecting the growth of the agricultural industry and of 
agricultural society in the different periods; the relation of agriculture to 
other industries, to politics, and to legislation ; and the influence of agri- 
culture on our national development. 

Recitations 3 ; credit 3. 

305. The History of the West, 1860-1890. A research course in 
special phases of History 150. Topics assigned at the first conference. 
Interests and preferences of the student will be considered. Primarily 
for graduates. Open to seniors who have had adequate preparation in 
History and Economic Science. 

Conferences and discussions as arranged ; credit 4. 

Note: Students desiring credit in History 8 or 110 may take History 
27 or 124 as a substitute. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

130a. Elementary Design. Exercises involving the use of funda- 
mental design principles. Sketches of still life, furniture and buildings to 
give a working knowledge of curvilinear and angular perspective. 

Rcc. 1, labs. 3, 3-hr.; credit 4; fee $2.00. 

160a. House Planning. A study of American domestic archi- 
tecture. The drawing of floor plans and the projection of elevations. 

Prerequesite 130b; rec. 1; labs. 2, 3-hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

150a 1 . Food Preparation. An intensive course covering the general 
principles and technique involved in the preparation of typical foods. 
Special attention given to developing pattern recipes and the modification 
based on these recipes; also to acquiring skill in the cooking processes. 

Firsl three weeks. Rec. 1; lab. 2, 3-hr.; credit 3; fee $5. 

150a 2 . Food Preparation. (Continuation of 150a 1 ). 

Second three weeks. Prerequisite 150a 1 ; rec. 1; lab. 2, 3-hr.; credit 3; 

fee $5. 

171a. Food: Marketing. Selection of food from the economic 
standpoint The production, transportation, and distribution of food 
products and the factors which influence the quality and cost. 

Firsl three weeks. Rec. 1; lab. 2, 3-hr. ; credit 3; fee $5. 

152a. Meal Planning. The planning, preparation and serving of meals 
for the family and for large groups with selection in relation to the cost 
and nutritive value of the food and the time and labor involved in the 
preparation and service. 



23 




A Class in Garment Making 



Second three weeks. Prerequisite 151a. Rec. 1; lab. 2, 3-hr.; credit 3; 
fee $5. 

151a. Nutrition and Dietetics. The principles of human nutri- 
tion and the application of those principles to the selection of food for 
normal individuals. Special consideration given to such problems as 
infant feeding, school lunches, and the cost of foods in relation to nutri- 
tritive value. Laboratory problems to give a quantitative idea of the funda- 
mental requirements in nutrition in terms of common food. 

First three weeks. Prerequisite Chem. 403, H. Ec. 150a 1 or 150a 2 ; rec. 
2; lab. 2, 3-hr.; credit 4; fee $5. 

151b. Nutrition and Dietetics. Continuation of 151a. Problems in 
abnormal nutrition with special attention to the dietetic treatment of 
disease. For undergraduate and graduate students. 

Second three weeks. Prerequisite 151a; rec. 2; lab. 1, 3-hr.; credit 3; 
fee $2.50. 

140a 1 . Garment Construction. Establishment of correct habits 
of work. Fundamental construction of processes for hand and machine 
sewing. A comparative study of standard sewing machines. Direct appli- 
cation of machine attachments to the laboratory problems. Recitation 
devoted to organization and analysis of work. Recognition of art prin- 
ciples a/id textile study related to laboratory projects. 

First three weeks. Rec. 1 ; lab. 2, 3-hr. ; credit 3 ; fee $2.00. 

140a 2 . Garment Construction. Prerequisite 140a 1 ; rec. 1 ; lab. 
2, 3-hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00; second three weeks. 

140b. Garment Construction. Emphasis placed on initiative in 
technique and choice of design. Students plan and make garments not 
only for themselves but for others. One problem is a made over garment. 
A study of silk and wool materials. 

Prerequisite 140a 1 and 140a 2 and 130a; rec. 1; lab. 2, 3-hr.; credit 3; fee 
$2.00. 

142a. Millinery. Designing hats suited to different types of indi- 
divduals and for different occasions. Technique of handling materials 
and making of hats designed. Renovation of materials and trimmings ; 
remodeling old hats. A study of millinerv as a trade for women. 

Prerequisite 140a; rec. 1; lab. 2, 3-hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 



24 

S-121a. Teaching Home Economics. This course is a Summer School 
adaptation of the regular course in special methods and practice teaching. 
It is planned for teachers of home economics in grades and high schools. 
It includes a study of the choice of suitable subject matter, method of 
presentation, equipment, illustrative material, and a comparison of the 
more recent text books designed for grade and high school classes. 
Special study will be made of problems in vocational Home Economics. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

HORTICULTURE 

71. General Horticulture. A general and elementary study of the 
growing of fruits and vegetables with exercises in management, planting, 
and propagation. 

Lectures 3; lab. and lect. 1, 2-hr. or lab. 1, 3-hr.; credit 4; fee $1.00. 

75. Plant Propagation. Asexual and sexual methods ; germinating, 
testing and storage of seeds ; multiplication of plants by cuttage, layerage, 
and graf tage ; nursery methods, and management. 

Prerequisites Hort. 3. Lecture 2; lab. 1, 2-hr.; credits 3; fee $1.00. 

365. Truck Farming. Preparation of soil, growing and marketing 
important vegetable field crops, including those grown for canneries, pickle 
factories, and other manufacturing establishments. Such crops include 
the cabbage, turnip, beet, sugar beet, and other root crops, the potato, 
tomato, onion, squash, melon, cucumber, and other vine crops. 

Lecture 3 ; credit 3. 

LIBRARY METHODS 

1. This course is designed for teachers who wish to become sufficiently 
familiar with library methods to care for school libraries. Lectures are 
given on the equipment and administration of school libraries, the classi- 
fication and arrangement of books in the library; care of catalogs, the 
principal works of reference, such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases, 
public documents and their indexes, indexes to periodicals, etc. Lectures 
and practice work in the college library. 

Recitation or 3 hr. lab. 1; credit 1. 

MANUAL TRAINING, TRADES AND INDUSTRY 

1. Elementary Vocational Drawing. Methods of presentation of 
mechanical drawing for the elementary and lower secondary grades, cov- 
ering instrument and line practice, projection problems and simple work- 
ing drawings. A course correlating with the manual training shop work. 

Labs. 3, 3 hrs. ; credit 3. 

2. Advanced Vocational Drawing. Methods of presentation and 
problems for the higher secondary grades, including machine drawing, 
building drawing, and problems correlating with bench work, wood turn- 
ing, foundry practice and forge shop. 

Prerequisite 1, or equivalent. Labs. 3, 3 hrs.; credit 3. 

11. Manual Training. Organization and methods of application of a 
course of study for the 6th, 7th, and 8th grades making of projects suit- 
able as type models for the same. Wood carving, care and use of hand 
tools, simple construction work, wood finishing as needed for these grades. 

Prerequisite must be accompanied by 12; lab. 3, 3 hrs.; credit 3; fee 
$2.00. 

12. Studies in Manual Training. Organization of a course of study 
for public school manual training (grades 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10). Aims and 
ideals of manual training and their relation to local conditions; woodwork- 
ing tools and the care of the same; text books and their use; wood 
finishing. 

Prerequisite must he accompanied by 11; lectures and recitations 3; 
credit 3 hr. 






25 




In an Engineering Laboratory 



13. Manual Training. Continuation of 11. Organization and appli- 
cation of a course of study for the 9th and 10th grades, making of projects 
suitable for type models for the same ; detailed study of hand tools ; care 
and use of wood working machinery ; wood turning, cabinet making, wood 
finishing. 

Lab. 3, 3 hrs. ; credit 3 ; fee $2.00. 

14. Studies in Manual Training. Continuation of 12. Plan- 
ning of manual training shop, shop system, selection and location of 
equipment and estimating cost ; study of home and community interests ; 
method of arousing and maintaining pupils' interest; composition of var- 
nishes, paints, glues, and wood finishes and proper methods of their appli- 
cation, furniture design. 

Prerequisite 12, and preceded or accompanied by 13; lectures and recita- 
tions 3 ; credit 3. 

15. Vocational Woodwork. Continuation of 13. Advanced and spe- 
cial problems. 

Labs. 3, 3 hr. ; credit 3 ; fee $2.00. 

16. Vocational Woodwork. Carpentry and millwork. A general 
course in framing and stair building; making of window frames and vari- 
ous kinds of millwork. Especially adapted for persons desiring to teach 
farm mechanics courses under the Smith-Hughes Law. 

Labs. 3. 3 hr. ; credit 3 ; fee $2.00. 

S-21. Trade Course in Automobile and Truck Operation and Re- 
pair. In addition to such instruction as will give a general knowledge of 
the subjects mentioned, the special departments enable students to special- 
ize according to their needs. By far the greatest part of the time is spent 
in shop work, where the student works under supervision, thus learning 
by actually doing the work himself. Special attention is given to dis- 
assembling, repair and assembling of standard types of automobiles, 
trucks and accessories. In the repair work, instruction and practice is 
given in exy-acetylene welding, and in soldering and brazing, as well as 
replacement of parts. Students in this course will have an opportunity to 



work in the engine, carburetor, ignition, starting and lighting, welding, and 
tire departments. Driving practice and road repair work are also offered, 
a large number of cars in running order being available for such instruc- 
tion. The engine laboratory in the transportation building is equipped 
with twenty engines representing practically all types of four, six and 
eight cylinder engines, including a Liberty truck engine. All of the 
standard types of ignition and starting and lighting systems are available 
and are mounted on engine units for study and demonstration purposes. 
In the storage battery department records of batteries are filed, inspection 
cards made out, and batteries are routed through the various operations, 
exactly as in battery service stations, so that the work of the student is 
of the most practical nature. Equipment is available for making all 
ordinary tire repairs and machine equipment and materials such as are 
used in a modern garage are provided. 

The purpose of this course is to give the teacher of vocational courses 
an opportunity to receive practical trade instruction. 

Lectures and labs. 3, 3 hrs. ; credit 3 ; fee $3.00. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. College Algebra. The first four weeks are devoted to a review of 
Algebra up to and including quadratics. This is followed by variation, 
proportion, the progressions, binomial theorem, series, partial fractions, 
principles and use of logarithms, and theory of equations. Students fail- 
ing in the review will be assigned to such work as they are fitted to 
pursue. 

Prerequisite, entrance algebra ; recitations 4 to 5 ; credit 4 to 5. 

la. Algebra (one-half time). This course covers the work taken up 
during the first part of College Algebra and is devoted to a review of the 
fundamental principles of algebra up to and including quadratic equations. 

It is an excellent preparation for any student planning to enter college 
from a non-accredited high school and the record will be taken in lieu of 
the entrance examination in mathematics for such students. For those 
who have been out of high school for a number of years and need review 
or for teachers desiring to take examinations for certificates, it will prove 
a very desirable course. It should not be taken by those who have not 
had at least a year of work in algebra in high school or its equivalent. No 
college credit is given. 

2. Plane Trigonometry. Definitions of the trigonometric funtions; 
derivation of trigonometric formulas with applications to trigonometric 
identities and equations; use of logarithms; solution of right and oblique 
triangles, with practical applications. 

Prerequisite 1; recitations 5; credit 5. 

3. Plane Aanalytic Geometry. Representation of points, lines, and 
curves in a plane; careful study of the graphs of equations, and investiga- 
tion of the line, the circle, and the conic sections. 

Prerequisite 2; recitations 3 to 5 ; credit 3 to 5. 

5c. Calculus. Differential and Integral. Problems showing relation of 
calculus to physics and mechanics; expansion of functions, indeterminate 
forms, curvature, rates, maxima and minima; areas, lengths of curves, 
surfaces of revolution, volumes of solids of revolution and other solids, 
centers of gravity, by single and double integration; elements of differ- 
ential efjiiations. 

Prerequisite 2 and 3; recitations 3 to 5, credit 3 to 5. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

111. Mechanical Drawing. Use of drawing instruments, practice in 
1' ttering, detailing and tracing. 
Labs. 2, 3 hrs. ; credit 2. 



27 

151. Projective Drawing. Principles of projection of the point, line 
and plane as applied in the preparation of general and detail engineering 
drawings of machines and structures. 

Prerequisite 111; recitation 1; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3. 

171. Technical Sketches and Drawing. Interpretation and reading 
of orthographic and pictorial sketches, of machine details and assemblies ; 
preparation of working drawings. 

Prerequisite 151; recitation 1; lab. 2, 3 hrs. ; credit 3. 

173. Elementary Pattern Work. Principles of joinery, wood turn- 
ing, carving and foundry practice applied to making simple patterns and 
core boxes for cast iron, brass and aluminum castings. 

Prerequisite 143; labs. 2, 3 hrs.; credit 2; fee $4.00. 

211. Working Drawings. Orthographic and pictorial sketching of 
machines ; preparation of shop drawings, lettering, tracing and blue print- 
ing. 

Prerequisite 171; labs. 2, 3 hrs.; credit 2. 

213. Advanced Pattern Work. Special pattern work; gearing, sweep 
and moulding machine work. 

Prerequisite 173; labs. 2, 3 hrs.; credit 2; fee $3.00. 

272. Statics of Engineering. Principles of pure mechanics as applied 
in engineering problems involving statics of rigid bodies and flexible cords. 

Prerequisites Math 5a and 5b; recitations 3; credit 3. 

313. Machine Work. Chipping, filing, scraping; babbitting and fitting 
bearings; mill wrighting; plain turning and thread cutting. 

Labs. 2, 3 hrs.; credit 2; fee $3.00. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

110a. Elementary French. The course will consist of a careful study 
of the essentials of French grammar, constant practice in pronunciation, 
composition, reading of ordinary French prose, and conversation. (For 
beginners.) 

Recitations 4; credit 4. 

110c. Elementary French. The work will consist of a review of 
grammar, reading of French prose, pronunciation, and simple conver- 
sation. A continuation of 110b and open to those who have had one year 
of French in High School. Students expecting to teach French will be 
given special group consideration. 

Recitations 4; credit 4. 

120a. Intermediate French. Selected readings from modern authors. 
Open to students who have had about one year of French. 

Recitations 2 or 3; credit 2 or 3. 

121. French Composition and Conversation. This course aims to 
train the student to speak French with some facility. Conversation will 
be based upon easy French narrative prose, upon daily life and current 
events, and French life and institutions. The composition work will cover 
the subjects discussed in class. Open to students who have had about one 
year of French. Students expecting to teach French will be given special 
group consideration. 

Recitations 2 or 3 ; credit 2 or 3. 

Courses in German and Spanish may be offered when requested by a 
sufficient number of graduate or regular students requiring these lan- 
guages for degrees. 

MUSIC 

M< tubers of the Summer School and others desiring musical instruction 
will be offered courses in Voice and Piano. The regular Summer Course 
in music will consist of three lessons a week, private lessons. These les- 
sons are extra and not included in the regular college fee and must be 



28 

arranged for with the director of the School of Music. The fees are 
payable in advance at the Treasurer's Office. 

Anyone desiring a lesser number of lessons than the regular Summer 
Course will pay a slightly higher rate than the following prices : 

Three lessons a week in Voice, $21.50 for six weeks. 

Three lessons a week in Piano, $21.50 for six weeks. 

The practice pianos of the School of Music will be at the disposal of 
students at the following rates : One hour a day for the six weeks or less, 
$1.50; two hours a day, $2.50; three hours a day, $3.50. 

These are the regular rates charged in this department during the col- 
lege year. For further details address, 

Archibald A. Bailey, 
Director, School of Music. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE (for Women) 

190a. Elementary Gymnastics. Calisthenics, light apparatus, folk 
dancing and games. 

Lab. 2, 1 hr.j fee $2.50. 

S. 198. Swimming. Instruction for beginners only. 

Labs. 3, 1 hr.; fee $1.00. 

Swimming pool open afternoons for all who can swim. Regulation 
suits required. 

194. Corrective Gymnastics. Individual work for correction of poor 
posture and physical defects. 

Lab. 1 hr. daily and individual instruction ; fee $2.50. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING (for Men) 

12a. Theory and Practice of Coaching. Theory of Play. Sports- 
manship. Rules. Training. Physiology. Anatomy. Hygiene. Actual 
Competition. Actual Coaching. 

Lecture 1 ; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 2. 

PHYSICS 

101. Mechanics, Heat and Light. Fundamental principles of physics; 
and their applications. 

Prerequisite Math. 17; lecture 1; recitation 2; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

330 O. N. General Physics. Principles of mechanics, heat, electricity 
and its applications, sound and light, including color and illumination. 
For Home Economics students. 

Lectures 2; recitations 2; lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 5; fee $2.00. 

404 O. N. Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Sound. Pre- 
requisite 303; lectures and recitations 5; lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 5; fee $2.00. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

1. General Psychology. An introduction to the study of the normal 
adult human mind. The main elementary course in Psychology. Re- 
quired for vState Teachers' certificate. 

Recitations 5 ; credit 5. 

14. Mental Tests. The nature of mental tests. The principles under- 
lying their development. Their application in vocational and industrial 
guidance and selection. The testing of 1,500,000 soldiers has not only 
developed tests of a very high degree of standardization but has fully 
demonstrated their value. Very important for teachers, employers, and 
vocational counselors. 

Recitations 2; credh 2. Prerequisite's Psychology 1 or equivalent. 

20. Educational Psychology. A treatment of special phases of Gen- 
et ;d and Genetic Psychology which are most applicable to education. The 






29 




One oe the Physics Laboratories 



processes of adaptation : instinct, impulse, habit, and will ; the applied 
psychology of perception, imagination, memory, association, attention, in- 
terest, simple feelings, emotions, and the higher thought processes ; special 
problems ; mental inheritance, the learning curve, individual differences, 
etc. 

Recitations 4; credit 4. 

25. Childhood and Adolescence. The characteristics of childhood 
and the critical changes of early adolescence. The nature and treatment 
of the instincts ; formation of habits ; the Kindergarten and Montessori 
system. Adolescent organizations : the gang, boy scouts, girls' campfire, 
rural clubs, etc.; the problems of the parent in home-training of the child; 
the significance of mental tests for children ; suggestions for the study 
club, parent-teacher associations, etc. 

Recitations 3; credit 3. 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 

22. The Fundamentals of Public Speaking. To help the student get 
command of himself. Attention is especially given to voice building and 
expression. 

Recitation 1 or 2; credit 1 to 2. 

23. Interpretation. Methods of vocal interpretation, criticism and 
delivery. Beside the class lectures and class exercises on topics pertaining 
to interpretation and delivery, each student is instructed privately and 
personally at stated intervals throughout the session. 

Prerequisite 22 or its equivalent ; recitations 2 or 3 ; credit 2 to 3. 

30. Extempore Speech. To develop the powers of sincere and effec- 
tive public speaking. The fundamental principles of speech organization 
and delivery studied according to the true extemporaneous method. The 
assimilation of the essentials of effective speaking and the working out of 
these essentials into actual practice before the audience. Each student is 




Summer Students Analyzing Soie 



given the opportunity to appear in an original speech before his fellow 
students at least once every week or ten days. 
Recitations 1, 2, or 3 ; credit 1 to 3. 



SOILS 

151. Soils. Identification, mapping and description of soil types in 
the field ; their occurrence, crop adaptation and importance in the state. 
The origin and classifiation of soils. The soil areas, types and problems 
in Iowa. 

Recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 3i ; fee $2.50. 

171. Special Problems in Soil Physics. Experiments dealing with 
the physical properties of soils and their effect on crop production. A 
wide range of special subjects. 

Investigations 9 hrs. ; credit 3; fee $2.50. 

251. Soil Fertility. The general principles underlying the mainten- 
ance of fertility in soils. The removal and return of plant food. The 
treatment and management of soils as affecting crop growth. Fertility 
studies on samples of soil from the home farm or any other soil. 

Prerequisite chem. 751 ; recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 3J ; fee $3.00. 

252. Manures and Fertilizers. Farmyard manure, its composition 
and value, preservation and use; commercial fertilizers, incomplete and 
complete, source and character, value and effect on various crops. In- 
fluence on soil fertility. 

Prerequisite 251 ; recitations 2; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 3 ; \ ; fee $3.00. 

271. Special Problems in Soil Fertility. Experiments dealing with 
the problem of maintaining and increasing the crop producing power of 
soils. .Studies of soils from the home farm to determine the best systems 
of soil and crop management. Valuable for men who expect to farm 
under corn-belt conditions. 

Investigations 9 hrs.; credit 3; fee $3.00. 

351. Soil Bacteriology. Same as Bact. 351. The occurrence and ac- 
tivities of soil bacteria in their natural habitat and a consideration of their 
influence on soil fertility. Quantitative bacteriolical examinations of soils 



31 

followed by qualitative and quantitative studies of the important bacterial 
processes in soils. 

Prerequisite Bact. 3b ; Recitations 3 ; labs. 3, 2 hr. ; credit 5 ; fee $3.00. 

352. Soil Bacteriology. Same as Bact. 352. Bacterial activities in 
relation to soil fertility. A lecture course. 

Recitations 3; credit 3. 

371. Special Problems in Soil Bacteriology. Same as Bact. 371. 
Experiments dealing with bacterial activities in soil and their effect on 
fertility. The fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, the transformation of 
nitrogenous, carbonaceous and mineral compounds in the soil ; the effect 
of manurial and fertilizer treatment on bacterial activities. 

Investigations 9 hrs. ; credit 3; fee $3.00. 

451. Soil Management. Plant food content and productiveness of 
particular types or classes of soils; the utilization of soils; principles of 
soil conservation. Treatment of special soils. General problems in soil 
management. 

Prerequisite 251; recitations 3; credit 3. 



GENERAL COURSES 

The Iowa State College offers in the Summer Session, as during the 
regular year, courses of a non-collegiate grade to help groups who are 
praticularly interested in the special lines of work offered by the College. 

During the summer these courses consist of home-makers' courses for 
mature women and special courses in agriculture, home economics, manual 
training and didactics for rural and grade teachers. These courses are 
described briefly below. 

HOMEMAKERS' COURSES 

The division of Home Economics will offer beginning and continuation 
courses of a very practical nature for homemakers of the state who may 
desire to take advantage of the summer work. This work has always 
been very popular because of its intensely practical nature and this sum- 
mer it has been decided to offer all courses coordinately, that is, without 
any pre-requisite requirements. 

Women who desire to come for the first two weeks of the Summer 
School can secure available units of work in the homemakers' courses and 
have at the same time an opportunity of attending the Rural Life Con- 
ference, or they may find full schedule of valuable work in the conference 
course, description of which follows : 

Conference Course. This course is planned to meet the needs of 
busy housewives who desire to keep in touch with the best methods 
of solving problems connected with the management of a home. 
The course pre-supposes a practical knowledge of cooking, sewing 
and cleaning which every housewife has. It aims to take up prob- 
lems relating to the care of the family. The food problems will 
include feeding the family so as to meet the dietetic needs of each 
member ; economical marketing and sanitary care of food. The 
clothing discussions will include help in judging and buying of 
household textiles, short cuts in sewing; the use of machine attach- 
ments and efficient laundering. The management of the family in- 
come will include suggestions as to keeping of household accounts 
and budgeting. 

This course will be conducted by means of lectures, discussions 
and demonstrations. Opportunity will be given for conferences on 
individual problems. The facilities of the laboratories and library 
will be open to members of the class. In any study of efficiency we 
know that physical health is essential. The Women's Gymnasium 
and swimming pool will be open for class work, and conferences will 
be held to discuss the need for providing community health and play 
programs. 

First two weeks, throughout the day. 

S. X. 1. Food Preparation and Service: a. Principles of cookery. 
Development of technique and skill. Planning, preparing and serving 
break lasts. Quiz. 1; Rec. and laboratories, 5 3-hr.; credit 4; fee $2.00. 

b. Continuation of (a) applied to luncheons. Quiz. 1; recitations and 
laboratories, 5 3-hr.; credit 4; fee $2.00. 

S. X. 10. The Essentials of Sewing: a. Fundamental stitches; use 
and adjustment of sewing machine. Making of underwear and laboratory 
apron, Emphasis placed on choice of materials, designs and advantages 



1 



33 

of correct placing of patterns. Study cotton materials. Students provide 
materials subject to approval. Recitations and laboratories, 4 3-hr. and 
1 2-hr.; credit 3; fee $1.50. 

b. Use of sewing machine attachments ; development of skill in sewing. 
Emphasis on methods of making, finishing and altering commercial pat- 
terns to measurements. Study linen and silk. Students provide material 
subject to approval. Quiz. 1; Recitations and laboratories, 5 3-hr.; credit 
4; fee $1.50. 

S. N. 20. Millinery: a. Paper patterns, buckram and willow frames, 
selecting, preparing, altering and covering commercial frames. Use of 
glue and stitches. Velvet, satin, sport and lace hats made. Trimmings 
and renovation. Students provide material subject to approval. 

Recitation 1; laboratories 2 3-hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

S. N. 30. Design: Elementary Design: Principles of design, propor- 
tion, subordination, rhythm, balance ; value of tones and color theory ; 
perspective. These fundamental principles are applied to simple abstract 
problems in lettering and spacing; furnish basis for specific problems. 

Recitation 1; laboratories 3 3-hr.; credit 4; fee $2.00. 

RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSES 
Tuition Free 

(Students who are high school graduates may take College credit work 
in agriculture, home economics and manual training upon payment of the 
fees, thus securing College credit as well as good work in useful subject 
matter.) 

The work for rural and grade teachers is offered to enable such 
teachers to have the advantages of the unusual facilities of The Iowa 
State College in preparation for teaching agriculture, home economics and 
manual training in the public schools, in an intelligent and effective man- 
ner. The instruction emphasizes the elemental phases of the subjects and 
gives particular attention to methods of preparing material and of organ- 
izing the work in the rural schools. The laboratories and teaching equip- 
ment of the College, including the library and the experiment farms, will 
be available to the students, but the aim throughout will be to handle the 
work so as to illustrate the possibilities of effectively teaching these sub- 
jects in the rural schools. The primary object is to give work in the in- 
dustrial subjects to present and prospective teachers, and other work will 
be offered only when carried along with industrial work. 

Admission to this course requires graduation from the common 
schools and the recommendation of the County Superintendent of 
Schools. The grades secured in agriculture, home economics and 
manual training are accepted by the State Educational Board of Ex- 
aminers at full value and transferred by them direct to teachers' 
certificates provided the work in any one of the subjects is carried 
as daily recitation for twelve weeks or double that amount of time 
for six weeks. The work for rural and grade teachers does not meet 
normal training requirements. 

Provision is made for the following work : 

1. General Agriculture S-3. This popular course dealing with Farm 
Crops, Plant Production, and Soils, will be offered during the first half of 
the 1919 Summer Session. The course is especially adapted to rural 
teachers. There will be two sections reciting daily. 

2. General Agriculture S-4. Topics dealt with are farm animals, 
including horses, cattle, sheep and swine, but with particular emphasis 
upon poultry. Poultry is considered by the state department and others 
as a topic particularly adapting itself for treatment in the rural and grade 
schools. The course will give the student a definite knowledge of the 
qualities to expect in good stock and will consider selection, improvement, 



34 




Apple Grading on the Coeeege Experimental Farm 



care and management. Attention will also be given to dairying, including 
the use of the Babcock test. 

3. Sewing S-32. This course includes the teaching of plain sewing 
upon articles which may be made in the one room rural school. Help 
will be given in the selection of materials, the practical work of cutting, 
finishing and repairing of garments, and in the use of the sewing machine. 
This course will also include a study of the methods used in presenting 
courses of sewing in the rural and grade schools. 

4. Cooking S-37. This course aims to teach the fundamental principles 
of cooking and the methods of teaching cooking in the rural schools. The 
work will include a study of food preparation, food value to the body 
and the planning and serving of economical meals. The major part of 
the work will be done in the regular college laboratories, and the re- 
mainder under conditions and with equipment that can be duplicated in 
the rural schools. A study will be made of equipment and of courses of 
study for the rural school. 

5. General Manual Training S-6. The introductory course of six 
weeks in general manual training will deal with the rougher and more 
practical farm problems and includes such exercises as saw horse, bench 
hook, nail box, corn tray, bird house, hog trough, milking stool, bench 
vise, seed sample case, chicken brooder, etc. Because of the bulky nature 
of the models in the exercises undertaken in this course, materials will be 
furnished without a fee and at the close of the course students will be 
given an option to purchase the models. at actual cost of material. 

6. General Manual Training v S-7. This will be a continuation of gen- 
eral manual training S-6, but will deal more particularly with farm home 
problems. The exercises will require more refined work and a higher 
degree of finish and will include the necessary basis in drawings and read- 
ings of the same. The following are some of the exercises which will 
be undertaken : Book rack, plant stand, waste basket, medicine case, hall 
tree, porch swing, bulletin case, screen, small Step ladder, sleeve board, 
flv trap, etc. Students will pay for lumber actually used and the com- 
pleted work will become the property of the student. Double period daily. 

X. Didactics. The work in didactics for rural and grade teachers will 
COfl it of two courses, as follows: 

Didactics T. A general course in didactics having in mind the pre- 



35 

paration of the teacher for school work and for passing the examination. 
The course will deal with management, study and the technique of the 
recitation. Special methods in the common branches. 

Didactics II. — Primary methods with particular attention to primary 
reading, busy work, and the special problems of the primary teacher. 
This course will be handled again during the coming summer by Miss 
Bertha Stiles, who has made it such a valuable course for lower grade 
teachers. 

9. Other Work. Teachers of any grade who are enrolled in the Sum- 
mer Session and are prepared to take college credit work may select sub- 
jects offered in the college credit list in so far as they are prepared to 
enter these classes. To secure college credit, the student must meet the 
usual preliminary requirements. It is customary here, as in other colleges 
and universities, to waive certain requisites in cases of mature students 
who obviously are prepared to take college work and for good reason have 
not complied with all the formal requirements. 

The following list of college subjects will be of particular interest to 
rural and grade teachers. See descriptions under college credit courses. 
Algebra la 
History 124 
Economics 51 
Phvsics 330 
English, 19, 20, 21 
Public Speaking 23 
Drawing, H. E. 130a 

See schedules of recitations at close of catalog. 

Last year 75% of the rural and grade teachers were qualified to take 
college credit work. Accordingly the time schedule of the classes for the 
above work has been arranged to permit this work to be taken in connec- 
tion with other studies. In addition to the above, work in music and in 
physical culture, including swimming, is open for rural and grade teachers. 



FEES IN GENERAL COURSES 

There will be no fees in connection with the work for rural and grade 
teachers. In the industrial subjects students may take the finished pro- 
duct on payment of the actual cost of materials used. 

SUGGESTIONS TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

1. Read carefully the description of the various courses and other mat- 
ter in this bulletin, and if the information is not sufficiently specific, do 
not hesitate to write for particulars. 

2. Fill out and mail the information blank on page 42 which will give 
us an idea of your demands. This places you under no obligations, but 
it gives the Director of the Summer Session a better basis for making 
plans to handle the work on an efficient basis when your arrive. 

3. Upon your arrival at the depot at Ames, make yourself known to a 
member of the Reception Committee, who will be recognized by the col- 
lege badge. If for any reason you miss the committee, take the college 
car to the college, and get off at Central Station. Men go direct to Alumni 
Hall, women to Margaret Hall. Room assignments will be made at these 
buildings. After securing a room, you are ready for registration. If you 
come on the Interurban, get off at the Campus. 

4. The following is the plan of registration : 

(1) Go to the Registrar's office, fill out the two cards there fur- 
nished you, pay the Summer Session fee (or deposit certificate signed 



36 

by your superintendent, entitling you to free tuition in the rural and 
grade teachers' course), and obtain a receipt. 

(2) From the registrar's office, you will be directed with reference 
to classifying officers. Complete classification. 

(3) If any of your courses carry laboratory fees, fee cards may 
be secured from the instructors, and fees paid at the Treasurer's 
office. 

5. There are ample accommodations, and advanced notice is not neces- 
sary. The college has been accustomed to handling 3,000 students during 
the regular year. However, if your plans are matured sufficiently early, 
it will assist in rapid assignment and registration if advanced notice is 
given. 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS 



Where schedules can be changed to the advantage of some students 
without inconvenience to others, changes will be made on Monday evening, 
June 16. 

Recitations daily unless otherwise specified. 

Abbreviations: A. Ed. — Agricultural Education. A. E. — Agricultural Engineering, 
A. J. — Agricultural Journalism. Ag. H. — Agricultural Hall. A. H. — Animal Hus- 
bandry. Bac. — Bacteriology. Bot. — Botany. Cen. — Central Building. Cnem. — 
Chemistry. ('. B. — Chemistry Building. 1). B. — Dairy Building. E con . — Economics. 
Kn. A. — Engineering Annex. En. H. — Engineering Hall. Eng. — English. F. C. — 
Farm Crops. F. Mang. — Farm Management. For. — Forestry. Geo. — Geology. 
Cym. — Gymnasium. H. E. — Home Economics. H. E. B. — Home Economics Build- 
ing. Hist. — History. Hort. — Horticulture. Lab. — Laboratory. Libry. — Library 
.Methods. Lit. — Literature. L. P. — Lower Pavilion. M. H. — Margaret Hall. 
Math. — Mathematics. M. E. — Mechanical Engineering. M. Lang. — Modern Language. 
M. T. — Manual Training. O. A. — Old Agricultural Hall. O. N. — Old Number. 
1'. C. — Physical Culture. P. S. — Pattern Shop. Phys. — Physics. Psych. — Psychol- 
ogy. Pub. Sp. — Public Speaking. R. — Room. Rec. — Recitation. Sc. B. — Science 
Building. Trans. B. — Transportation Building. U. P. — Upper Pavilion. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 

(First Half) 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


A. E. 51 


! Lab. 9-12 M. W. F. S. 


107 Ag. H. 


A. E. 55 


1 Lab. 2-5 M. W. F. S. 


107 Ag. H. 


A. E. 60 


1 Rec. 8, Lab. 2-5 T. Th. 


204 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 51 


1 Rec. 2 


210 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 54 


I Rec. 7 


207 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 57 


| Rec. 4 


210 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 58 


IRec. 10 


208 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 109b. 


1 Rec. 9 


306 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. S-121a 


| Rec. 8 


10 H. E. B. 


A. Ed. 131a 


I Rec. and Lab. 1-4 


208 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 131h 


I Rec. and Lab. 1-4 


208 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 131c 


! Rec. and Lab. 1-4 


208 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. S-132 


1 Rec. 3 


210 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. S-142 


| Rec. 1 


210 Ag. H. 


A H. 101 


1 7-9, 3-5 M. W. F. S. 


U .P. 


A. H. 102 


1 10-12 M. W. F. S. 


U .P. 


A. H. 103 


M-3 M. W. F. S. 


U .P. 


A. H. Ill 


I Rec. 9 M. W. F. S. 






I Lab. 7-9 M. W. F. S. 


109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 112 


| Rec. 9 M. W. F. S. 






Lab. 10-12 M. W. F. S. 


117 Ag. H. 


A. H. 113 


I Rec. 3 M. W. F. S. 






1 Lab. 1-3 M. W. F. S. 


109 Ag. H. 


A. I. 28a 


| Rec. 3 


19 Ag. H. 


Bac. 4 


i Rec. 7, Lab. 2 hrs. 


105 Sc. B. 


Bac. 3 


1 Rec. 10, Lab. 2 hrs. 


105 Sc. B. 


Bac. 3a 


I Rec. 10, Lab. 2 hrs. 


105 Sc. 15. 


Bac. 3h 


1 Rec. 10, Lab. 2 hrs. 


105 Sc B. 


Bac. 3c 


| Rec. 10, Lab. 2 hrs. 


105 Sc B. 


Bac. 31a 


\s arranged 


105 Sc P.. 


Bac. 311) 


| As arranged 


105 Sc. B. 



38 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS — Continued 



Bot. 135 


Rec. 4 T. Th, 








Lab. 3-5 M. W. F. S. 




312 Cen. 


Bot. 320 


Rec. 7 M. W. F. S., Lab. 


9-12 


312 Cen. 


Bot. 415 


Rec. 11 M. W. F. S., 








Lab. 1-4 M. W. F. S. 




312 Cen. 


Bot. 609 


As arranged 




312 Cen. 


Chem. 375 


Rec. 11, Lab. 8-11 M. W. 


F. 


125 C. B. 


Chem. 375a 


Rec. 2, Lab. 8-11 M. W. 


F. 


181 C. B. 


Chem. 376 


Rec. 3 T. W. Th. F., 








Lab. 8-11 M. W. F. 




125 C. B. 


Chem. 502 


Rec. 8, Lab. 10-12 T. Th. 


S. 


286 C. B. 


Chem. 503 


Rec. 2, Lab. 10-12 M. W. 


F. 


286 C. B. 


Chem. 504 


Rec. 9 M. T. W. F., Lab. 


10-12 


286 C. B. 


Chem. 751a 


Rec. 10, Lab. 8-10 W. F. 




286 C. B. 


Chem. 751b 


Rec. 11, Lab. 8-10 T. Th 




286 C. B. 


Chem. 752 


Rec. 2 T. W. Th. F., 








Lab. 8-11 T. Th. S. 




125 C. B. 


Chem. 802 


Rec. 9, Lab. 10-12 




125 C. B. 


Chem. 901 


As arranged 






Dairy 15 


Rec. 7, Lab. 3-5 T. Th. 




12 D. B. 


Dairy 65 


Rec. 8 M. W. F. S., 








Lab. 10-12 T. Th. 




12 D. B. 


Econ. 51 


Rec. 2 




306 Ag. H. 


Econ. 315 


Rec. 3 




306 Ag. H. 


Eng. 19 


Rec. 9 




4 Cen. 


Eng. 20 


Rec. 10 




4 Cen. 


Eng. 21 


Rec. 1 




102 Cen. 


Eng. 251a 


Rec. 3 




4 Cen. 


Eng. 441 


Rec. 4 




4 Cen. 


F. C. 151 


Rec. 1, Lab. 7-10 M. W. 




307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 152 


Rec. 11, Lab. 7-10 T. F. 




307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 153 


Rec. 1, Lab. 7-10 Th. S. 




306 Ag. H. 


F. C. 154 


Rec. 10 








Lab. 2-5 T. Th. 




306 Ag. H. 


F. C. 160 


6 6 hr. labs, for 3 weeks, 


or 6 






3 hr. labs, for 6 weeks 




308 Ag. H. 


F. Mang. 22 


Rec. 10, Lab. 3-5 M. W. 


F. 


307 Ag. H. 


Forestry 


In summer camp 






Hist. 27 


Rec. 2 




208 Cen. 


Hist. 124 


Rec. 9 




208 Cen. 


Hist 305 


As arranged 




208 Cen. 


H. E. 130a 


Rec. 4 T. Th.. Lab. 1-4 




206 H. E. B. 


If. E. 140a'-a- 


Rec. 7 M. W. Th. F., Lab. 


8-12 


110 H. E. B. 


If. E. 1401) 


Rec. 9 M. Th., 




14 H. E. B. 




Lab. 9-12 T. W. F. S. 




102 H. E. B. 


II. K. 142a 


Rec. 1 W. S., 








Lab. 1-4 M. T. Tli. F. 




Ill IT. E. B. 


II. E. LSOa'-a^ 


Rec. 7 M. T. Th. F., 




10 U. E. B. 




Lab. 8-12 




200 H. E. B. 


II. K. 151a-b 


Rec. 8, and 1 M. W., 




14 H. E. B. 




Lab. 9-12 




202 II. E. B. 


If. K. 152a / 


Rec. 7 M. T. Th. F., 




14 H. E. B. 


If. E. 171a j 


Lab. 8-12 




208 II. E. B. 


If. E. 160a 


Rec. 9 T. S.. 




14 11. E. B. 




Lab. 9 12 M. W. Th. 1 




206 II. E. B. 


If. E. S 121a 


Rec. X 




10 II. E. B. 


Hort 71 


Rec. 10, Lab. 2-5 T. Th. 




207 Ag. H. 


Librv. 


Rec. 3T.. Lab. 1-4 Th. 







39 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS — Continued 



Math. 1 


Rec. 7, and 1 M. W. F. S. 


214 Ccn. 


Math. 2 


Rec. 8, and 3 M. W. F. S. 


215 Cen. 


Math. 3 


Rec. 7, and 3 M. W. F. S. 


215 Cen. 


Math, la 


Rec. 8 


213 Cen. 


Math. 5c 


Rec. 7, and 1 M. W. F. S. 


213 Cen. 


M. K. Ill 


Any days 8-12 or 1-5 


403 En. H. 


m. l-:. \?\ 


Rec. M. W. 11 






Lab. any days 8-12 or 1-5 


403 En. H. 


V I-.. 1/3 


As arranged 8-10 or 1-5 


P. S. 


M. E. 211 


As arranged 8-10 or 1-5 


403 En. H. 


M. K. 213 


As arranged 8-10 or 1-5 


P. S. 


M K. 272 


Rec. 8 


205 En. H. 


M. E. 171 


Rec. T. Th. 11, Lab. 8-12 any 






days 


403 En. H. 


M. E. 313 


8-12 or 1-5 as arranged 


M. S. 


M. T. 1 


As arranged 8-12, 1-5 


36 C. B. 


M. T. 2 


As arranged 8-12, 1-5 


36 C. B. 


M. T. 11 


As arranged 8-12, 1-5 


36 C. B. 


M. T. 12 


7 


181 C. B. 


M. T. 13 


As arranged 8-12, 1-5 


36 C. B. 


M. T. 14 


8 


181 C. B. 


M. T. 15 


As arranged 8-12, 1-5 


36 C. B. 


M. T. 16 


As arranged 8-12, 1-5 


36 C. B. 


M. T. S-21 


Lab. 2-5 


Trans. B. 


M. Lang. 110a 


7, and 2 hrs. as arranged 


119 Cen. 


M. Lang. 110c 


11, and 2 hrs. as arranged 


119 Cen. 


M. Lang. 120a 


9 daily or M. W. F. S. 


119 Cen. 


M. Lang. 121 


9 daily or M. W. F. S. 


118 Cen. 


P. C. 190a 


4 any four days 


M. H. Gym. 


P. C. 194 


As arranged 


M. H. Gym. 


P. C. 198 


5 or 6, any three days, 10 M. 






W. F, 7:30 p. m. T. Th. 


M. H. Gym. 


P. T. 12a 


4-6 except Sat. 


Gym. 


Phvs. 101 


Rec. 1 


207 En. H. 


Phys. 330 (0. N.) 


Rec. 8, and 2, 






Lab. 10-12 any 3 days 


207 En. H. 




(For teachers four labs.) 


207 En. H. 


Phys. 404 (0. N.) 


Rec. 9, and 3, 






Lab. 10-12 any 3 days 


207 En. H. 


Pub. Sp. 22 


Rec. 2 M. W. or M. W. F. S. 


311 Cen. 


Pub. Sp. 23 


Rec. 7 M. W. F. S. or daily 


311 Cen. 


Pub. Sp. 30 


Rec. 3 M. W., M. W. F. S., or 






daily 


311 Cen. 


Psych. 1 


Rec. 8, and 4 M. T. W. F. 


210 Cen. 


Psych. 14 


Rec. 1 M. W. F. S. 


210 Cen. 


h. 25 


Rec. 11 


210 Cen. 


Soils 151 


Rec. 8 M. W. F. S., 






Lab. 10-12 M. W. F. S. 


8 Ag. H. 


- 171 


As arranged 


8 Ag. H. 


Soils 251 


Rec. 9, M. W. F. S., 






Lab. 1-3 M. W. F. S. 


8 Ag. H. 


Soils 252 


Rec. 10, M. W. F. S., 






Lab. 3-5 M. W. F. S. 


8 Ag. H. 


Soils 271 


As arranged 


8 Ag. H. 


Soils 351 


Rec. 8, Lab. 2-4 daily 


24 Ag. H. 


Soils 352 


Rec. 8 


24 Ag. H. 


371 


As arranged 


8 Ag. H. 


Is 451 


Rec. 1 


8 Ag. H. 



40 

GENERAL, AND RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSES 

(First Half) 



Course 



Hour of Recitation 



Agriculture S-3 
Agriculture S-4 
Didactics I 
Didactics II 
H. E. S.N. lb 
H. E. S.N. la 
H. E. S.N. 10a 
H. E. S.N. 10b 
H. E. S-32 
H. E. S-37 
Manual Training S-6 
Manual Training S-7 
Music 
Algebra la 
♦Economics 51 
♦English 19 
♦English 20 
♦History 124 
♦Physics 330 
♦Reading (P. S. 23) 



Room 



I 10-12, 3-5 

1-3 

Rec. 3 

Rec. 2 

Rec. 1 Sat., Lab. 1-4 

Rec. 9 Sat., Lab. 9-12 

Rec. and Lab. 1-4 10-12 Sat. 
| Rec. 9 Sat., Lab. 9-12 

Rec. and Lab. 10-12 

Rec. and Lab. 1-3 

Sec. 1, 8-10; Sec. 2, 1-3 

Sec. 1, 10-12; Sec. 2, 3-5 

As arranged 

Rec. 8 

Rec. 2 

Rec. 9 

Rec. 10 

Rec. 8 

Rec. 8 and 2, Lab. 10-12 4 days 
I Rec. 7 



B. 



306 O. A 
L. P. 

10 Cen. 

10 Cen. 
210 H. E 
210 H. E. B 
100 H. E. B 
100 H. E. B 
111 H. E. B 
208 H. E. B 

36 C. B. 

36 C. B. 

213 Cen. 
306 Ag. H. 

4 Cen. 

4 Cen. 
208 Cen. 
207 En. H. 
311 Cen. 



♦ College Credit Courses. 



MODEL SCHOOL PROGRAM 

Room 1, Central, Grades First and Third. 

Room 3, Central, Grades Fifth and Eighth. 

Note : Work in the model school begins at 8 o'clock and continues until 
11:30. In the lower grades emphasis will be placed upon reading, lan- 
guage, numbers, busy work. History, geography and nature work will be 
secondary and more or less related to the language and story work. 

The work in the upper grades will place greater emphasis upon English, 
arithmetic, physiology and geography and will also demonstrate the possi- 
bilities of work in home economics and agriculture. The rural school plan 
on home economics work will be demonstrated three days each week 
The work in agriculture will be correlated with the school plot at the 
college and the home project work being carried by the pupils. Definite 
schedule of program is not here given because of the necessity of changing 
the program in order to properly accommodate the work for observatioi 
purposes. 



41 



SCHEDULE FOR THE SECOND HALF 

Schedule for the second half of the Summer Session is indicated below. 
It is thought that this will not need to be modified. At any rate, modifica- 
tion^ will be made only when students can be better accommodated. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 
(Second Half) 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


A. Ed. 51 


Rec. 7 


307 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 53 


Rec. 10 


208 Ag. H. 


A. Ed. 55b 


Rec. 8 


307 Ag. H. 


V K. 61 


Rec. 1 T. Th., 
Lab. 2-5 M. W. F. S. 


204 O. A. 


A. E. 74 


Rec. 1 M. W., 






Lab. 2-5 T. Th. 


204 O. A. 


A. E. 70 


Rec. 9 M. W. F. S., 
Lab. 9-12 T. Th. 


204 O. A. 


A. H. 241 


Rec. 11 


109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 400-402 


Rec. 1, 2 T. Th., Lab. 2-5 M. 






W., 3-5 T. Th. 


110 C. B. 


Chem. 504 


Rec. 8 M. T. W. F., 






Lab. 9-11 


15 C. B. 


Econ. 120 


Rec. 9 


306 Ag. H. 


Eng. 20 


Rec. 2 


13 Cen. 


Eng. 430a 


Rec. 3 


13 Cen. 


F. C. 151 


Rec. 10, Lab. 7-10 M. W. 


307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 152 


Rec. 2, Lab. 7-10 T. Th. 


306 Ag. H. 


Hort. 75 


Rec. 8 M. W. F. S, 


1 




Lab. 1-3 T. Th. 


208 Ag. H. 


Hort. 365 


Rec. 7 


208 Ag. H. 


M. T. 1 


Lab. 8-10, 1-5, as arranged 


36 C. B. 


11 T. 2 


Lab. 8-10, 1-5, as arranged 


36 C. B. 


M. T. 11 


Lab. 8-10, 1-5, as arranged 


36 C. B. 


M. T. 12 


Rec. 7, 






Lab. 8-10, 1-5, as arranged 


181 C. B. 


M. T. 13 


Lab. 8-10, 1-5, as arranged 


36 C. B. 


11 T. 14 


Rec. 8, 






Lab. 8-10, 1-5, as arranged 


181 C. B. 


11 T. 15 


Lab. 8-10, 1-5, as arranged 


36 C. B. 


M. T. 16 


Lab. 8-10, 1-5, as arranged 


36 C. B. 


Psych. 1 


Rec. 11, 4 M. W. F. S. 


210 Cen. 


Psych. 20 


Rec. 9, 4 T. Th. 


210 Cen. 


Soils 151 


Rec. 7 M. W. F. S. 


i 




Lab. 10-12 M. W. F. S. 


7 Ag. H. 


Soils 251 


Rec. 8M. W. F. S., Lab. 1-3 


7 Ag. H. 


Soils 252 


Rec. 9 M. W. F. S., Lab. 1-3 


7 Ag. H. 



THE LIBRARY OF THE 
JAN * 1931 

''* ' ' "" H L * IS. 



42 



INFORMATION BLANK 

Prospective students are asked to use this blank in furnishing informa- 
tion and in making requests for further information. Cut out and mail 
to the Director of Summer Session, Ames, Iowa. 

Check below the courses in which you are interested and indicate course 
numbers after name of subject. Check other points also. 

Courses totaling nine semester hours, is our recommendation as to full 
time college credit work for each half. 

COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 



. . Agricultural Education 

. .Agricultural Engineering 

. .Agricultural Journalism 

. . Animal Husbandry 

. . Bacteriology 

. . Botany 

. . Chemistry 

. .Dairy 

. . Economic Science 

. . English 

. . Farm Crops 

. . Farm Management 

. .Forestry 

. . .History Public 

Soils 



.Home Economics 

. Horticulture 

. Library Methods 

. Literature 

.Manual Training 

.Mathematics 

.Mechanical Engineering. 

. Modern Language 

.Physical Culture 

. Physical Training 

.Physics 

.Poultry 

.Psychology 

Speaking 



1 can attend only the first half, June 16-July 23. . . 
I can attend only the second half, July 24-Ang. 27 

I can attend either half 

I will attend for twelve weeks 



43 
GENERAL COURSES 
General Agriculture 

Domestic Science for rural and grade teachers 
Domestic Science for Homemakers 
Manual Training 



Education (Didactics) 

Check below if you want the above work for the following reason. 

12 weeks work for grades in the new subjects (Agriculture, Domes- 
tic Science and Manual Training) 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Are you a graduate of an accredited High School ? 

Do you want a copy of Rural Life Conference Circular? 



— Do you want camping space? (men and families only) 

r 

-5 Is this card to be taken as request for advanced registration or simply 

o for information ? 



q Shall we reserve room for you 

Name 

Address (city) 

Countv 



State 

The following will be interested in receiving information about the 
Summer Session : 

Xame Address 



. 



►j.. •••••••••••• 



•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••' 



3 



The American's Creed 

3[ BELIEVE in the United States of America as 
a Government of the people, by the people, 
for the people, whose just powers are derived from 
the consent of the governed; a democracy in a Re- 
public; a sovereign Nation of many sovereign States; a 
perfect Union, one and inseparable; established upon 
those principles of freedom, equality, justice, and 
humanity for which American patriots sacrificed their 
lives and fortunes. 

I therefore believe it my duty to my country to 
love it, to support its Constitution, to obey its laws, to 
respect its flag, and to defend it against all enemies. 

WILLIAM TYLER PAGE 



•(• *..•., 



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THE COLLEGE 

The Iowa State College of Agriculture and Me- 
chanic Arts conducts work in five major lines: 

Agriculture:, Engineering, 

Home Economics, Industrial Science, 

Veterinary Medicine 

The Graduate Division conducts advanced research 
and instruction in all these five lines. 

Four-year, five-year, and six-year collegiate courses 
are offered in different divisions of the College. Non- 
collegiate courses are offered in agriculture, engineer- 
ing, and home economics. Summer Sessions include 
graduate, collegiate, and non-collegiate work. Short 
courses are offered in the Winter. 

Extension courses are conducted at various points 
throughout the state. 

Research work is conducted in the Agricultural 
and Engineering Experiment Stations and in the 
Veterinary Research Laboratory. 

Special announcements of the different branches of 
the work are supplied, free of charge, on application. 
The general college catalogue will he sent on request 

Address 

HERMAN KNAPP 

Ames, Iowa Registrar 



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Iowa State College 

of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts 

Official Publication 



VOL. XVIII 



FEBRUARY 18, 1920 



NO. 38 



TENTH ANNUAL 

SUMMER SESSION 

GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
1920 



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AMES, IOWA 

Published weekly by Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Ames, Iowa. Entered as 
i-clais matter, and accepted for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103. Act of 
October I, 1917, authorized September 23, 1918. 



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Iowa State College 

of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts 

Official Publication 



VOL. XVIII FEBRUARY 18, 1920 NO. 38 






TENTH ANNUAL 

SUMMER SESSION 

GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
1920 



AMES, IOWA 

Published weekly by Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Ames, Iowa. Entered as 
second-class matter, and accepted for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 110?, Act of 
October ?, 1917, authorized September 21, 1918 



1920 SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR 



June 12, Saturday — Registration, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

June 14, Monday— 8:00 a. m., Registration. 1:00 p. m., work begins on 
regular schedule. 
Beginning of Rural Life Conference. 

June 16, Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. — First Summer Session Convocation, 
Agricultural Hall. 

June 23, 24, 25, Wednesday, Thursda3', and Friday — Examination for 
county uniform certificates. Room 317, Agricultural Hall. 

July 12-16 — Conference on Vocational Agriculture. 

July 21, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m. — Close of first half of Summer Session. 



July 22, Thursday, 8:00 a.m — Beginning of second half of Summer Ses- 
sion. 

July 28, 29, 30, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday— Examination for 
county uniform "certificates. Room 317, Agricultural Hall. 

August 26, Thursday, 4:00 p.m. — Close of Summer Session. 



1921 Summer Session 
First Half, June 13— July 20. 
Second Half, July 21— August 26. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The college always has recognized its special responsibility in the train- 
ing o\ high school and college teachers of agriculture, manual training, 
home economics, and the application of science to these vocational subjects. 

Teachers in service can be helped best through the Summer Session, 
and in a large measure they have a right to the advantages of the unusual 
equipment of the Iowa State College. This is especially true since the 
legislation requiring the teaching of the industrial subjects in the public 
schools. In the forthcoming Summer Session the excellent facilities of 
the college, as usual, will be available to the fullest extent to those who 
wish to enroll as students. 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

The establishment of vocational education on a large scale through the 
Smith-Hughes bill places an additional responsibility upon the Iowa State 
College, and this responsibility it wall endeavor to meet fully. 

The Iowa State College has been authorized as the one institution of 
the state to train teachers of vocational agriculture, and federal funds are 
made available under the Smith-Hughes Vocational Educational Law for 
the support of such training. The course for the training of teachers of 
home economics at the Iowa State College has also been approved by the 
State and Federal Vocational Boards. This means that the Iowa State 
College has new obligations for the training of teachers under the Smith- 
Hughes Law in addition to former obligations imposed by the Nelson 
Amendment to the Morrill Act. 

Who May Properly Attend. On account of the conditions of entrance, 
many receive benefit from the Summer Sessions who do not attend during 
the regular year. The following- should be particularly interested in the 
Summer Session : 

1. All Teachers, or persons expecting to teach next year, may use 
the Summer Session to secure work in the industrial subjects as required 
by recent legislation. 

2. Teachers and Supervisors especially interested in advanced phases 
of Agricultural Education, Home Economics Education, or education in 
Trades and Industry, — state Supervisors or special teachers of these sub- 
jects under the- Smith-Hughes law r . 

3. Superintendents, Principals and Supervisors. The large number 
of superintendents and principals who have been enrolled in the Summer 
Session in the past indicates clearly that it is serving them to good ad- 
vantage, and meeting a special need which they feel for getting acquainted 
with the newer subjects of manual- training and agriculture, together with 
courses in vocational education. The Summer Session gives such super- 
intendents and principals an opportunity to secure work of a high charac- 
ter under regular college instruction and under favorable conditions. 

4. County Superintendents. Six weeks at the Iowa State College 
will be unusually helpful in view of the rapid development of the voca- 
tional and industrial subjects in the schools. 

5. High School Graduates will find an opportunity to start the college 
bourse. High school graduates who think of entering the Iowa State 
College in the fall of 1920 may take advantage of the Summer Session to 
become acquainted with college methods and to secure work towards 



graduation. Increasing numbers arc taking- advantage of the Summer 

Session for this purpose. 

6. Regular Students ix the Iowa State College may make up hack 
work, shorten their course by doing advanced work, or increase their 
clectives. 

7. Students in other colleges who are interested in the industrial work 
and related lines will find other colleges willing to accept credits made at 
this institution. 

8. Former GRADUATES may complete the necessary work in psychology 
and vocational education in order to secure the first grade state certifi- 
cate. 

9. Any Mature Individual who gives evidence of ability to carry the 
work with profit will be admitted without examination, but such individual 
must satisfy the department concerned as to his or her ability to carry 
the work. 

10. Rural and Village Ministers will find especially valuable help in 
the Rural Life Conference. Bankers, farmers, rural leaders, mothers and 
daughters will find a welcome, an atmosphere of culture and inspiration, 
and practical help for their work. 

11. Women of maturity will find particular help in the homemakers' 
courses offered during the Summer Session. These courses have proved 
popular and have attracted women not only from all parts of Iowa, but 
from all parts of the nation. 

Conditions of Admission. All students who can profit by the instruc- 
tion offered will be admitted without examination, admission to a partic- 
ular course being satisfactory to the professor in charge. It is presumed 
that all applying for admission have a serious purpose, and are interested 
in the industrial work College credit will be granted, however, only to 
those who meet standard entrance requirements, and all entering the 
college for the first time are urged to send credentials to the regis- 
trar covering entrance requirements or advanced standing, in order 
that at the close of the summer term grades carrying college credit 
may be sent out in regular form. 

Studies and Credits. Nearly two hundred college credit studies arc 
offered. An average student should be aide to make nine hours credit 
during a single half of the Summer Session. All courses offered are com- 
pleted during a single half of the Summer Session by increasing the num- 
ber of recitations per week. There arc no split courses. A student desir- 
ing to carry more than nine (or nine and a fraction) hours of college 
credit work will be required to make application for permission to take 
extra work, application being countersigned by the instructors involved. 

Late Entrance. Because of the rapidity with which the work moves 
in a short session, students should enter in time to attend the first session 
of all clas.es. Work begins at 1 :()0 p.m. on Monday, June 14. Courses 
in the new industrial subjects have laboratory periods, and students should 
therefore plan to he present for the first meeting of the class. 

General Courses. In the general courses, students will he given more 
freedom as to the muiiher of hours to he carried. The schedule, however, 
should he reasonable. Experience proves that a schedule that is too heavy 
i- unsatisfactory both to the student and to the instructors. 

Special Work. Students wishing to do advanced or other special work 
not announced in this bulletin should communicate at an earl) date with 

the Director of the Summer Session, or with the professor in whose de- 
partment the) wish to work. Consideration may be given to a sufficient 
niinihi r oi requests. 



s 

Meeting Residence Requirements for a Degree Through Summer 
Session Work. Because of the largely increased attendance at the Sum- 
mer Session, provision lias been made for the satisfying of residence 
requirements for a degree on the basis of four Summer Sessions o!" six 
weeks each. The amount of work required for the degree will need to be 
supplemented by work in absence, or by correspondence. 

Graduate and Research Work which will apply on the higher degrees 
conferred by this institution will again be offered" in certain departments 
during the Summer Session. In the recent Summer Sessions there have 
been a goodly number of graduate students from this and other institu- 
tions, who have availed themselves of this opportunity for completing 
work towards the Master's or Doctor's degree. For further details re- 
garding the opportunities lor advanced work, see page 27. 

Fees. The single Summer Session fee of $5.00 for each half of the 
session, covers work in all courses with the exception of the Music De- 
partment. The fee for less than the full time is $1.00' a week," with $2.00 
as a minimum; or $1.00 per credit hour for college credit work, with $2.00 
as a minimum. Laboratory fees are indicated in connection with the 
descriptions of the courses. No fee is charged for attendance at the 
Rural Life Conference. 

Room and Board. Room and board is available in private homes and 
at the college dormitories at prices which are customary throughout Iowa. 
The cafe in Alumni Hall will be open during the entire Summer Session, 
and will be managed on the cafeteria plan. 

Women will arrange for rooms through the regular college committee 
of which the Advisor of Women is chairman. The college dormitories will 
be open for women students for board and room. After the dormitories 
arc filled, the Advisor of Women will assign women to selected houses about 
the campus, where the regular college rules apply. In the dormitories and 
private homes alike, mattresses only are furnished for the cots, so that 
students should bring a pillow, sheets, pillow cases and an extra blanket. 

Rooms for men will be available in private homes and rooming houses 
about the campus. Rooming arrangements for men will be in charge of 
the Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

Expenses. Expenses will vary with the individual. For each half 
the expenses need not exceed $60 to $75, in addition to car fare. This 
makes provision for tuition, room and board for six weeks, books and 
laundry, and other incidentals. 

Certificates. The State Board of Educational Examiners will grant 
five-year, first-grade certificates to graduates of the Iowa State College, or 
othcr approved colleges, who have completed (a) nine quarter-hours of 
p>ychology, and (b) twenty-one hours of education. The courses offered 

| in the Summer Session enable students to meet these requirements. 

Teachers' Examination. The State Teachers' examination for June 

i and July will be held at the college during the Summer Session for the 
convenience of the teachers in attendance. One expecting to take an ex- 
amination at the college should bring with him a statement from the 
county superintendent, together with county superintendent's receipt show- 

j big payment of fee, which will admit to the examination. Where such 

j fee has not been previously paid it will be collected and forwarded to the 

| county superintendent. 

The Appointment Committee. In order to better serve the schools 
of the state, the faculty has provided a regular Appointment Committee, 
the duties of which are to assist tlie students of the college who desire to 

I enter educational work, in finding positions for which they are best fitted, 
and to aid school officials in finding the teachers, principals, supervisors 



and superintendents best prepared for the positions to be filled. Students 
of the Summer Session, who intend to teach or wish to better their posi- 
tions, may register with this committee. Blanks which are provided for 
that purpose may be secured by calling at the office of the Director of the 
Summer Session, Room 318, Agricultural Hall. No fee is charged for the 
services of this committee. 

Chapel. Chapel services are held at 9 :30 a. m., Wednesday of each 
week and all students are expected to attend. This is more or less in the 
nature of a convocation as well as a chapel service, and furnishes oppor- 
tunity for announcements or for brief remarks upon subjects of immedi- 
ate interest. 

Each Sunday evening, vesper services are held from 6:15 to 6:45 at the 
campanile when the weather is favorable. In case of inclement weather, 
the meeting is held in Agricultural Assembly. 

Summer Employment. Students coming for the short Summer Ses- 
sion are not advised to seek employment, but to give their full time to 
school work. This is particularly urged in the case of teachers desiring 
to have the grades in agriculture, home economics and manual training 
transferred direct to the certificate. 

There are usually some summer calls for help. Students may learn of 
these calls through the Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

Recreation. While the primary object of the Summer Session is work 
and study, yet these will be facilitated by a sufficient amount of recrea- 
tion. Students are urged to effect organizations and to arrange for tourn- 
aments in tennis, baseball, track, or indoor work. The Committee on 
Games and Recreation will encourage and help in organizing the details of 
this work. 

Special Features. One feature of the Summer Session which is par- 
ticularly worth while is the opportunity to hear educators of national repu- 
tation. The policy of selecting a limited number of men whose addresses 
no one can afford to miss will be continued this year. These lectures for 
the most part are scheduled for the evening; occasionallv, however, at 
5:00 o'clock. 

The announcement is made with very great satisfaction that Dr. C. A. 
Prosser, formerly Federal Director of Vocational Education, will be here 
for a series of lectures during the Summer Session. Dr. Prosser is the 
foremost authority in the country on vocational education. 

Library. The library of the Iowa State College is well selected and .it 
is so managed as to make it serviceable to all students during the Summer 
Session. 

Equipment. The equipment of the Iowa State College for work in 
agriculture, home economics, manual training, and related subjects is in 
keeping with the wealth and resources of the state. In many respects, 
the Summer Session is the best season of the year for studying agri- 
culture, and the regular college instructors in charge of the work use 
freely the resources of the college and the experiment station. 

Location. Ames is almost at the geographical center of the state of 
[owa, on the main line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad. It is 
about thirty-five miles north of Des Moines, with which it is connected 
branch line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad and by the Fort 
Dodge, Des Moine! and Southern (interurban) running from Fort Dodge 
and Rockwell City to Des Moines. A branch of the Chicago & North- 
tern from Ames penetrates the northern part of the state. Ames is 
proverbially a clean town, having no saloons or billiard halls. 

Students should plan to arrive on Saturday or Monday. In case il 



■ 



is absolutely necessary to arrive on Sunday, advanced notice should be 
given, with the request that rooms be arranged for, at least temporarily. 

CONFERENCES 

Rural Life Conference. The Rural Life Conference is held during 
the Summer Session. 

In the past, this conference has been most helpful to Iowa and neigh- 
boring states in stimulating and developing rural leadership. Speakers 
of note from state and nation will appear before the conference. 

The lectures in the Rural Life Conference are free to Summer Session 
students, as well as members of the Conference. For special bulletin 
giving detailed program of the Conference, write Dean Chas. F. Curtiss, 
Chairman of the Rural Life Conference Committee. 

Conference of Teachers of Agriculture. Professor W. H. Bender, 
State Director of Vocational Education, has fixed the week of July 12 to 
16 as the date for the Conference of Teachers of Vocational Agriculture. 
In addition to special work by Professor Bender and his assistant, Pro- 
fessor E. F. Cramer, specialists in various lines from the college, as well 
as outside men, will participate in the conference. This conference should 
be of interest, not only to present and prospective teachers of vocational 
agriculture, but also to present teachers of general agriculture and to 
principals and superintendents who desire to get in a short space of time 
a reasonably adequate notion of the plans for vocational work in agri- 
culture. 

LEGAL PROVISIONS OF INTEREST TO TEACHERS 

A large part of the work offered in the Summer Session is arranged in 
direct response to recent legislation. Work is therefore arranged to meet 
legal requirements. The laws of the state encouraging work in agricul- 
ture, home economics and manual training are in common with similar 
laws throughout the entire United States. The movement for the indus- 
trial work in the schools is not local nor is it transitory. It is gathering 
force each year. It is simply the recognition of the fact that education to 
be effective must be connected up directly with the work and dominant 
interests of the people. The government census shows that 68% of the 
people of Iowa are rural and that 49.2% are actually living upon farms. 
This makes agriculture the one dominant occupation of the state. For 
women, of course, home economics is the one great interest, but women 
living on the farm are almost equally interested in farm operations. While 
Iowa is not a large manufacturing state at present, the output of its fac- 
tories is increasing steadily each year. Industry in one form or another 
takes most of the time of every one and there is no reason why our educa- 
tion should not connect up more and more with industry. It should put 
joy and satisfaction as well as scientific insight into all industrial and 
manual occupations. 

Any county superintendent can instruct teachers as to the legal require- 
ments or the requirements of the State Educational Board of Examiners 
with reference to the new subjects. 



OFFICERS AND FACULTY 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 



D. D. Murphy, President, Elkader. 
W. C. Stuckslager, Lisbon. 

Geo. T. Baker, Davenport. 

Paul E. Stillman, Jefferson. 

Frank F. Jones, Villisca. 

P. K. Holbrook, Onawa. 

Chas. R. Brenton, Dallas Center. 

Edw. P. Schoentgen, Council Bluffs. 

B. F. Ketcham, Farmington. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

W. R. Boyd, Chairman, Cedar Rapids. 

Thomas Lambert, Sabula. 

W. H. Gemmill, Secretary, Des Moines. 

AUDITOR AND SECRETARY SCHOOL RELATIONS COMMITTEE 

Jackson W. Bowdish, Auditor and Accountant, Des Moines. 

John E. Foster, Secretary School Relations Committee, Des Moines. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

Raymond A. Pearson, President. 

E. W. Stanton, Vice-president, Central Building. 
G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session, Agricultural Hall. 
Herman Knapp, Treasurer and Registrar, Central Building. 

SUMMER SESSION COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, President. 

C. F. Curtiss, Dean of Agriculture. 
Anson Marston, Dean of Engineering. 
R. E. Buchanan, Dean of Graduate College. 
Catherine J. MacKay, Dean of Home Economics. 
S. W. Beyer, Dean of Industrial Science. 
G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session. 

PROFESSORS 

A. A. Bailey Music 

E. D. Ball Zoology 

P. E. Brown Soils 

l\. E Buchanan Bacteriology 

H. Cessna Psychology 
VV. F. Coover Chemistry 

1 C. Cunningham Two Year Horticulture 
II. D. 1 [ughi Farm Crops 



K. C. Ikeler 

G. B. MacDonald 

C. W. Mayser 

tl.Melhus 

Martin Mortenson 

H. B. Munger 

A. B. Xoble 

L. H. Pammel 

L. B. Schmidt 

Frcdcrica Shattuck 

P. S. Shearer 

K. G. Smith 

W. H. Stevenson 

George H. Yon Tungeln 

I. A. Wilkinson 

G. M. Wilson 



Animal Husbandry 

Forestry 

Physical Training 

Botany 

Dairy 

Farm Management 

English 

Botany 

History 

Public Speaking 

Animal Husbandry 

Trades and Industries 

Soils 

Economic Science 

Chemistry 

Vocational Education 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 



Ruth N. Bailey 
F. M. Baldwin 
Florence E. Blazier 
Iva Brandt 
F. E. Brown 

A. B. Caine 

X. T. Cleghorn 
Julia Colpitts 
Louis De Vries 
Myrtle Ferguson 
Joanna Hansen 
F. M. Harrington 
M. D. Helser 
Clyde McKee 

E. M. Mervine 

F. B. Paddock 
H. J. Plagge 

R. R. Raymond 
R. W. Rogers 
R. S. Stephenson 
Harold Stiles 

B. P. Stonecifer 
Thomas F. Vance 
Earl Weaver 



Home Economics 

Zoology 

Home Economics 

Home Economics 

Chemistry 

Animal Husbandry 

Mechanical Engineering 

Mathematics 

Modern Languages 

Home Economics 

Home Economics 

Horticulture 

Animal Husbandry 

Farm Crops 

Agricultural Engineering 

Zoology 

Physics 

English 

Physical Training 

Animal Husbandry 

Physics 

Horticulture 

Psychology 

Animal Husbandry 



». ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 



R. N. Berryman 
Blair Converse 
Rosamond Cook 
E. F. Cramer 
Marion E. Daniellson 

C. S. Dorchester 
J. M. Early 
Fred C. Fenton 

D. F. Firkins 
Gertrude Herr 
John Hug 

C. A. Iverson 

Lilies Knappenberger 



Physical Training 

Agricultural Journalism 

Home Economics 

Vocational Education 

Mathematics 

Farm Crops 

Trades and Industries 

Agricultural Engineering 

Soils 

Mathematics 

Mechanical Engineering 

Dairy 

Home Economics 



10 



R. L. MacFarland 


Trades and Industries 




Ned Merriam 


Physical Training 




A. E. Miller 


Agricultural Engineering 




A. B. Moore 


History 




D. F. Scoles 


Chemistry 




A. Starbuck 


English 




L. L. Stewart 


Animal Husbandry 




A. Helen Tappan 


Mathematics 




Marcia E. Turner 


Home Economics 






INTRUCTORS 




Myrtle J. Bihl 


Physical Education 




Earl Br.essman 


Farm Crops 




J. A. Burrows 


Chemistry 




Ruth Cessna 


Chemistry 




Clarissa Clark 


Bacteriology 




L. A. Flagler 


Trades and Industries 




J. R. Gass 


Trades and Industries 




H. F. Hertz 


Agricultural Engineering 




Ruth Kentzler 


Public Speaking 




Nelle Knappenberger 


Home Economics 




A. F. Nichols 


Mechanical Engineering 




Grace Ogg 


Home Economics 




Edith Palmer 


Home Economics 




E. C. Potter 


Mechanical Engineering 




R. C. Reidesel 


Mechanical Engineering 




C. B. Russell 


Physical Training 


F. F. Sherwood 


Chemistry 




Helen Smith 


Mathematics 




E. M. Spangler 


Mechanical Engineering 




W. B. Ward 


Horticulture 
ASSISTANTS 




J.J. Canfield 


Chemistry 




Frances Morrison 


Chemistry 
SPECIALS 




H. I. Eells 


Vocational Education 





COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 



The courses described below are the same as those offered during the 
college year and will be taught by the regular college faculty. The de- 
scriptions are quoted from the regular college catalog. 

Other courses may be offered when requested by a sufficient number of 
students. Students who have become irregular due to military service, 
food production, manufacture of munitions, or other causes incident to 
the war will be given every opportunity possible to make up their work 
during the Summer Session. 

As the Summer Session is approximately one-half the length of a col- 
lege quarter, the number of hours per week devoted to a course in the 
Summer Session will be two times what is shown in the descriptions 
below. Nine hours per week constitutes full work in the college courses. 
There is little doubt but that the numbers wanting each course will justify 
offering it. 

The regular amount of work for a single Summer Session will enable 
one to secure eighteen hours of agriculture and this will meet require- 
ments in some schools. Any combination of animal husbandry, agricul- 
tural engineering, dairy, farm crops, farm management, poultry, horti- 
culture, or soils, is acceptable and all of this is the right type of agri- 
cultural work for the prospective high school teacher. The reasonably 
small units of specialized work are considered much more desirable than 
courses in general agriculture. The schedule is so arranged as to avoid 
conflict and enable the student to carry the full amount of agriculture 
during the first and second halves of the summer school. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

51. Forge Shop. Forging and welding iron and steel. Making, hard- 
ening and tempering small tools. Work designed to be helpful in repair 
of farm equipment. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 2. Fee $3.00. 

52. Carpentry. Use, care and sharpening of tools. Joining, framing 
and rafter cutting. Helpful in farm building, planning and construction. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 2. Fee $3.00. 

55. Advanced Forge Work. The repair and care of agricultural 
equipment including plow share work, autogenic welding, forging of 
special farm equipment and tools. For prospective teachers. 

Prerequisite 51 ; lab. 2, 3 hr. Credit 2. Fee $3.00. 

60. Farm Machinery and Farm Motors. Mechanics and materials; 
study of the construction, adjustment, operation and testing of farm ma- 
chinerv and farm motors; measurement and transmission of power. 

Prerequisite, Physics 101. Rec. 3, lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $2.00. 

61. Gas Engines and Tractors. The construction, operation, adjust- 
ment, and care of gasoline and oil engines and tractors. 

Prerequisite 60. Rcc. 1 ; lab. 2, 3 hr. Credit 3. Fee $2.50. 

74. Concrete and Masonry. Materials, specifications and tests; 
study of mixtures, forms, reinforcement; concrete on the farm. Other 
fireproof building materials. 

Lecture 1; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 2. Fee $2.00. 



77. Farm Sanitary Equipment. Lighting, heating, ventilation, water 
supply, plumbing, sewage disposal. 

Rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 3. Fee $1.50. 

79. Farm Buildings and Equipment. Plans, materials, construction, 
lighting, heating and ventilation of farm buildings; water supply, sewage 
disposal. 

Prerequisite 80. Rec. 2;' lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 3. Fee $1.00. 

106a. Farm Machinery. Research. Hours and amount of credit as 
arranged. 

106b. Farm Power. Research. Hours and amount of credit as ar- 
ranged. 

107. Farm Structures. Research. Hours and amount of credit as ar- 
ranged. 

AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISM 

28a. Beginning Technical Journalism. News values, news style, 
news gathering and writing and the applications to agricultural, engineer- 
ing, home economics subject-matter. 

Prerequisites, English 40c, 140c, or 240c. Rec' 3. Credit 3. 

29a. Feature Writing for Technical Journals. Writing of the long- 
er feature and magazine articles dealing with agriculture, engineering or 
home economics. 

Rec. 3. Credit 3. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

A. H. 101. Types and Market Classes of Beef and Dual Purpose 
Cattle. Judging; types, carcasses, markets, market classifications. 

Rec. and labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 2. Fee $1.00. 

A. H. 102. Types and Market Classes of Sheep and Horses. Similar 
to 101. 

Rec. and labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 2. Fee $1.00. 

A. H. 103. Types and Market Classes of Dairy Cattle and Hogs. 
Similar to 101. 

Rec. and labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 2. ■ Fee $1.00. 

A. H. 111. Breeds of Beef and Dual-Purpose Cattle. Judging; 
origin, history, type, and adaptability. 

Prerequisite 101. Lecture 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 3§. Fee $1.00. 

A. H. 112. Breeds of Sheep and Horses. Similar to 111. 

Prerequisite 102. Lectures 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 3£. Fee $1.00. 

A.H. 113. Breeds of Dairy Cattle and Hogs. Similar to 111. 

Prerequisite 103. Lectures 2 ; labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 31 Fee $1.00. 

A.H. 218. Animal Nutrition. Fundamental basis of nutrition; prac- 
tical methods. Nutritive ratios and feeding standards. 

Prerequisite Chem. 752; prerequisite or classification in Vet. Phys. 611. 
Lectures 3. Credit 3. 

A .11.224. Feeding and Management of Beef Cattle and Sheep. 
I For Senior-,) similar to 222. 

Prerequisite 222. Lectures 2; lab. 1, 2 hr. Credit 2§. Fee $2.00. 

A. 11.240. Animal Feeding. (For Agronomy students.) Composi- 
tion and digestibility of feeding stuffs; preparation; feeding standards and' 
< alculation of rations. 

Prerequisite Chem. 751. Lectures 5. Credit 5. 
A 11.211. Animal Feeding. Similar to 240. 
Prerequisite Chem. 551, 751, or 821. Rec. 3. Credit 3. 



13 

A.H.400. General Poultry Husbandry. Commercial production; 
judging, breeding, housing, diseases, sanitation, marketing. 

Rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $2.00. 

A. H. 402. General Poultry Husbandry. Continuation of 400. Feed- 
ing, incubation and breeding. 

Rec. 1; lab. 1, 2 hr. Credit 1§. Fee $2.00. 

500. Advanced Animal Production and Nutrition. Feeding and 
management of live stock. Practical experimental methods; research 
work. 

Credit 3 to 10. 

505. Research in Animal Breeding. Special problems in heredity and 
breeding. 

Credit 3 to 10. 

510. Research in Dairy Husbandry. Dairy breeds ; milk production 
and herd management. 

Credit 3 to 10. 

515. Research in Poultry Husbandry. Incubation, brooding, feeding, 
breeding, marketing. Principles and practices of management of flocks. 

Credit 3 to 10. 

BACTERIOLOGY AND HYGIENE 

3. General Bacteriology. Morphology, classification, physiology and 
cultivation of bacteria; relation of bacteria to health of man, animals and 
plants. 

Prerequisite Organic Chemistry. Fee $5.00. 

A. (Students in Animal Husbandry.) 
Lectures 3; labs. 6 hrs. Credit 5. 

B. Primarily for students in Agriculture, Farm Crops and Soils, and 
Farm Management, emphasizing the agricultural applications of bac- 
teriology. 

Lectures 3; labs. 6 hrs. Credit 5. 

C. Primarily for students in Dairying, Industrial Science and Indus- 
trial Chemistry. 

Lectures 3; labs. 6 to 9 hrs. Credit 5 to 6. 

4. Household Bacteriology. Bacteria in their relation to the prob- 
lems of the home and community. 

Lectures 3 ; labs. 6 hrs. Credit 5. Fee $5.00. 

31. Research in General or Systematic Bacteriology. 

A. For undergraduates. Credit 2 to 5. Fee $5.00. 

B. For graduates. Credit 1 to 10. Fee $5.00. 

75. Research in Pathogenic Bacteriology. (For graduate students.) 
Prerequisites 3 and 64 or equivalent. Fee $5.00. 

173. Research in Sanitary Bacteriology and Hygiene. (For gradu- 
ate students.) 
Prerequisite 3 and 156 or equivalent. 
262. Research in Household Bacteriology. (For graduate students.) 

BOTANY 

135. Elementary Plant Morphology. (Agricultural students.) Seed 
plants, their structure and function ; study of the various groups of sim- 
pler plants. 

Rec. 1 ; labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 21. Fee $2.00, 



14 

148aC. (For research students.) Special problems in morphology. 

Rec. and labs, as arranged. Credit 5, Fee $3.00. 

320. General Plant Pathology. Discussion of the nature, cause and 
control of diseases of field, orchard and forest crops. 

Prerequisite 200. Rec. 2; labs. 3, 3 hr., or 3, 2 hr. Credit 5 or 4. 
Fee $4.00. 

325. Advanced Plant Pathology. Cultural, physiological, histological 
an}- cytological technique. Laboratory practice in isolation of parasites, 
germination, inoculation, and carrying stock cultures. 

Prerequisite 320. Rec. 2 ; labs. 3, 3 hr. Credit 5. Fee $5.00. 

326. Plant Pathology. Specific problems in the diseases of plants. 
Prerequisites 200 and 325, as arranged. Credit 2 to 10. Fee $3.00 or 

$5.00. 

415a, 415b. Systematic Botany. Flowering plants or thallophytes. 
Historical survey of various systems of classification ; groups by means of 
representatives. 

A. Systematic Spermatophytes. 

Prerequisite 129 or 135. Rec. 2; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $3.00. 

B. Advanced Conference in Systematic Botany. Special groups 
of spermatophytes. 

Rec. 2; labs. 3, 3 hr. Credit 5. Fee $3.00. 
416. Research in Systematic Botany. 

A. (For agricultural students.) Plants of economic importance and 
those related to agricultural and horticultural problems. 

Prerequisites Botany 144 or 200, 415, Zool. 1, or Bact. 3. Rec. and 
labs, as arranged. Credit 5. Fee $3.00. 

B. (For forestry students.) Botany of national and state parks and 
forest reserves. 

Field work, as arranged. Credit 3. Fee $3.00. 

481a. Research in Seed Testing. Structure, impurities and adultera- 
tion of seeds. 

Prerequisites 415 and 490. Lectures and labs, as arranged. Credit 5. 
Fee $3.00. 

604b. For graduates. Credit 5. Fee $5.00. 

609. Research. Advanced courses are offered in (a) Plant Mor- 
phology, (b) Plant Pathology, (c) General Botany and Taxonomy. 

CHEMISTRY 

502. Principles and the Non-Metallic Elements. 

A. (For students who have not had high school chemistry.) 
Lcc. 2; rec. 1 ; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Deposit $6.00. 
I'.. (For students who have bad high school chemistrv.) 
Lcc. 2; rec. 1; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Deposit $6.00. 

C. (For students desiring a more extended study.) 
I.- . 2; rec. 1 ; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 5. Deposit $9.00. 

503. General Chemistry. Metallic elements. 

A. (For students who have not had high school chemistry.) 
LeC. 2; rec. 1 ; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Deposit $6.00. 

B. (For students who have bad high school chemistry.) 
Prerequisite 502. Lee. 2; rec. 1 ; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Deposit $6.00. 

C. (For studeni desiring a more extended study.) 

equisite 502. !,<•<•. 2; rec 1 ; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 5. Deposil $9.09 



15 

504. Qualitative Analysis. Tests for and separation of the common 
metallic and non-metallic ions. 

Prerequisite 503. Lee. 1 ; rec. 1 ; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 4. Deposit $9.00. 
C. (For students desiring a more extended study.) 
Rec. 2; labs. 3, 3 hr. Credit 5. Deposit $9.00. 
521a, 521b, 521c. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Atomic 
structure, periodic law, valency, ionization, etc. 

A. Prerequisite 515b or 605b. Lectures 3. Credit 3. 

B. Lectures 3. Credit 3. 

C. Lectures 3. Credit 3. 

563a, 563b, 563c. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Theory, methods 
and difficult separations. 

Prerequisite 561b. Recitation or conference 1; labs. 2 to 6; 3 hr. Cre- 
dit 3 to 7. Deposit $9.00 to $12.00 for each course. 

751a, 751b. Applied Organic Chemistry. Properties, classification, 
and methods of preparation of organic compounds. Special emphasis 
upon agricultural applications of the subject. 

Prerequisite 504. Lee. 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 3 J. Deposit $7.50. 

752. Agricultural Analysis and Bio-Chemistry. Gravimetric and 
volumetric analysis ; analysis of agricultural products ; lectures on bio- 
chemistrv and the elements of nutrition. 

Prerequisite 751b. Lee. 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 3J. Deposit $7.50. 

765. Analysis of Soils and Fertilizers. An advanced course taking 
up detailed and complete methods. 

Prerequisites 514, 561c, 606b, 651c. Lectures 1; labs. 3, 3 hr. Credit 4. 
Deposit $12.00. 

775. Applied Organic Chemistry. (Home Economics students.) 
Fundamental principles of organic chemistry. Special attention to com- 
pounds of household importance. 

Prerequisite 509b. Lee. 3; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 5. Deposit $9.00. 

776. Food Chemistry. Elementary quantitative analysis ; study of 
common focli and household products, their composition and methods of 
analysis. 

Prerequisite 775. Lee. 3 ; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 5. Deposit $9.00. 

802. Physiological Chemistry and Nutrition. Chemical composition 
of living matter ; digestion ; fundamentals of nutrition. 

Prerequisite 752 or 776. Lee. 3; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 3 to 5. Deposit 
$9.00. 

803. Advanced Physiological Chemistry and Nutrition. Chemistry 
of tissues, urine, feces ; metabolism ; specific effects of faulty nutrition. 

Prerequisite 802. Lee. 3; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 3 or 5. Deposit $9.00. 

841. Special Problems. Physiological Chemistry applied to dietetics, 
veterinary medicine, animal nutrition, bacteriology etc, 

Prerequisite 805c. Conference 1 ; labs. 2, 3 hr. or more. Credit 3 or 
more. Deposit $9.00. 

901. Research. (Graduate students.) Credits arranged. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

1109. Structural Engineering. Advanced work in the design of all 
types of concrete and steel structures. 

1110. Experimental Engineering. Advanced work in experimental 
hydraulics, concrete and concrete materials, iron and steel, and other ma- 
terials of construction. 



16 

1111. Water and Sewage Treatment Systems. Preparation of plans 
and specifications for water and sewage treatment works, including neces- 
sary coordinate work in Chemistry and Bacteriology. 

1112. Highway Engineering. Advanced pavement design; the rela- 
tion between types of roads and methods of financing; advanced work in 
bituminous and non-bituminous road materials testing. 

DAIRYING 

15. *Farm Dairying. Secretion, composition, testing and separation of 
milk for butter fat, total solids and acidity; use of separators and care of 
cream ; the farm manufacture of butter, ice cream, and cheese. 

Lee. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $2.00. 

60. Manufacture of Ice Cream and Ices. Care and preparation of 
materials used. Plain and fancy ice creams and related products. 

Lee. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 3. Fee $3.00. 

80. Research in Manufacture of Butter. 

81. Research in Manufacture of Ice Cream. 

82. Research in Management of Dairy Plants. 

102. Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 102). Bacteria in milk and its de- 
rivatives ; the production and handling of dairy products from the hygie- 
nic viewpoint. 

Prerequisite Bact. 3c. Lee. 4; labs. 3, 2 hr. Credit 4 to 6. Fee $5.00. 

143. Research in Dairy Bacteriology (Bact. 143). For graduate 
students.) 

Prerequisite 102. 

* Those contemplating taking Dairy 65 may classify for Dairy 15. The 
work offered in the latter subject is very similar but more complete than 
in Dairy 65. Substitution will be permitted. 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE 

50. Elementary Economics. (For students in Home Economics.) 
Rec. 3. Credit 3. 

159. Research. Individual investigation of selected problems. 
By arrangement. Credit 1 to 6. 

160. Thesis. Research work and preparation of thesis, which may be 
credited as partial requirements for advanced degrees. 

315. Rural Sociology. Rural social life and its improvement; social 
forces and factors ; institutions and organizations. 

Rec. 3. Credit 3. 

340. Research. The field of rural sociology. Conference course, seni- 
or year. 

Credit 1 to 6. N 

350. Social Surveys in Absentia. Surveys of school districts and 
church parishes. Credited a§ partial requirements for an advanced degree. 

Credit 4 to 10. 

380. Thesis. On special subjects in the field of rural sociology. A 
partial requirement for an advanced degree in graduate work in rural 
sociology. 

ENGLISH 

19. Introductory College Course. Structure of the sentence and of 
ilif: paragraph. Daily paragraph themes. The purpose is to teach the 



ii 



17 

student correctness, force, and case in sentence structure and orderliness 
in the arrangement of thought. 
Rec. 3. Credit 3. Will he accepted as substitutes for 40a, 140a, or 240a. 

20. Exposition. Principles and methods of expository writing; logical 
basis in definition and division ; different types of exposition, with study 
of models; careful attention to the construction of paragraphs and the 
making of plans and outlines ; a short theme almost daily, with longer 
ones occasionally, constant emphasis on the application of the principles 
studied. 

Rec. 3. Credit 3. Will be accepted as substitute for 40b (19), 140b 
(116) if supplemented by additional work, or 240b (220). 

21. Narration and Description. Expository and suggestive de- 
scription; better vocabulary through search for the specific word; simple 
and complex narrative, with incidental description ; plot and characteriza- 
tion ; securing interest, as well as clearness and good order; analysis of 
good models. Themes almost daily, to train the student to apply the 
principles studied. 

Rec. 3. Credit 3. Will be accepted as substitute for 40c, 140c, or 240c. 

251a.. Masterpieces, English. Shakespeare to Wordsworth; the Vic- 
torian period, with special attention to one essayist, one poet and one 
novelist. 

Prerequisite 240c. Rec. 3. Credit 3. 

430a. The American Short-Story. 

Rec. 3. Credit 3. 

441. Argumentation. Inductive and deductive argument; fallacies; 
analyzing, abstracting, and classifying arguments on some question of 
present importance; briefing; writing forensic. 

Prerequisite 40c, 140c, or 240c. Rec. 3. Credit 3. 

FARM CROPS 

151. Corn Production. Adaptation, importance, cultural methods, 
harvesting, marketing, uses, care of seed corn. Plant study, judging of 
single and ten ear samples. 

Rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $1.50. 

152. Small Grain Production. Oats, wheat, barley, rye. Characteris- 
tics, adaptation, seed selection, cultural methods, harvesting, storing, uses. 
Identification of grains. "Judging for seed and market. 

Rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $1.50. 

153. Corn and Small Grain Judging. Judging seed samples of lead- 
ing varieties — corn and small grains. Market grading, origin, character- 
istics, and value of standard grain varieties. 

Prerequisites 151 and 152. Rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 3. Fee $2.00. 

154. Forage Crop Production. Grasses, legumes and other crops 
suitable for forage. Adaptation, cultural methods, uses. Identification of 
plants, seeds and common adulterants. 

Prerequisites 151 and 152. Rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $2.00. 

181. Research in Crop Production. Problems of growth, harvesting 
and storage of cereal crops. 

Prerequisites 151, 152, 154. Credit 1 to 10 hrs. 

182. Conferences in Crop Production. Reports and discussion on 
current investigation. 

281a, 281b, 281c. Research in Crop Breeding. I. Cereal breeding. 
II. Forage crop breeding. III. Methods of investigation. Special prob- 
lems with the Iowa Experiment Station. 

Prerequisite Farm Crops 251. 



18 

282. Conferences in Crop Breeding. Reports and discussions on 
current investigations. 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

22. Farm Management. Factors controlling the success of farming 
as found in farm surveys ; types ; farm layout ; organization and manage- 
ment of successful farms. 

Lectures and rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 4; fee $1.00. 

27. Research. Original investigation of a special farm management 
problem. 

FORESTRY 

Summer school work in Forestry is offered during both terms of the 
summer session. Courses 76, 77, 78 and 79 are open only to technical 
Forestry students of this institution or other colleges or to students giv- 
ing evidence from former training or experience that they are qualified 
to handle the work. 

Courses 91, 92 and 93a are advanced courses open to graduate students 
and to undergraduates desiring to secure additional elective credit in the 
subj ect. 

The entire summer session work in Forestry is of a very practical na- 
ture, the purpose being to give the students practical training and experi- 
ence in the various lines of forestry work. Field investigations make up 
the major portion of the work. The 1919 summer camp was established 
on the Arapaho National Forest in Colorado. The 1920 camp will either 
be located in Colorado or one of the adjacent states. 

76. Applied Lumbering. A detailed study of logging and milling op- 
erations in an important forest region. 

Summer Forestry Camp. Field work, 5, 3 hr. periods ; credit 5. 

77. Camp Technique. Personal equipment for camp life; ration lists 
for trips ; useful knots, packing hitches and emergency equipment. 

Summer Camp. Credit 3. 

78. Forest Mensuration. Field practice in scaling logs, estimating 
timber and preparing various forest maps. 

Summer Camp. Field work 5, 3 hr. periods ; credit 5. 

79. Field Silviculture. Field studies of forest types, natural repro- 
duction, improvement cuttings, marketing timber for cutting under various 
silvicultural systems. 

Summer Camp. Field work 5, 3 hr. periods ; credit 5. 

91. Advanced Forest Management. Special problems in the regula- 
tion of yield in the forest. Construction of working plans. 

Summer Camp. Field work, 5, 3 hr periods; credit 5. 

92. Advanced Planting. Detailed studies of forest nurseries. Special 
problems in timber planting and reforestation work. 

, Summer Camp. Field work, 5, 3 hr. periods ; credit 5. 

93a. Forestry Research. Special lines of investigation selected by the 
Student in consultation with the Forestry faculty. 
Summer Camp. Field work. Credit 2 to 12 hours. 

GEOLOGY 

450. Thesis. Special work in economic geology, petrology, dynamic 
geology, Structural geology, metamorphism, historical geology, or strati- 
graphlC geology. Credit 5. 






19 

510. Advanced Agricultural Geology. Work continued through 3 to 
9 quarters, Credit 3 to 10 as arranged. Fee $1.00 to $3.00 per quarter. 

520. Advanced Mining Geology. Work continued through 3 to 9 
quarters. Credit 3 to 10 as arranged. 

HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT 

110. Industrial History of the United States. 

Recitations 3 or 4 ; credit 3 or 4. 

214. American Government. 

Recitations 3 or 4; credit 3 or 4. 

320. Research in Economic History. For graduate students. 

Credit 3 to 9. 

Note 

Students desiring four hours' credit in History 110 or 214 may register 
in these courses as scheduled for the three-hour credit, with the privilege 
of making up the additional hour by assigned readings in the Library. 

Students desiring credit in History 124 may take History 110 as a sub- 
stitute. 

HOME ECONOMICS 
Applied Design 

130a. Elementary Design. Fundamental design principles. 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

130b. Advanced Design. Prerequisite 130a. 

Rec. 1 ; labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3 ; fee $2.00. 

133a. Elementary Costume Design. Prerequisites 241a, 130b. 

Rec. 1 ; labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3 ; fee $2.00. 

135a. House Design. Prerequisite 473. 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

Household Art 

241a. Garment Construction. Prerequisite 90 hrs. sewing in an ac- 
credited high school. 

Rec. 1 ; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee $2.50. 

241b. Advanced Garment Construction. Prerequisite 241a or 240a, 
and 241b and 130a. 

Rec. 1 ; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3 ; fee $2.50. 

241c. Garment Construction. Prerequisites 241b and 133a. 

Rec. 1 ; lab. 2, 3 hr.j credit 3 ; fee $2.50. 

243a. Millinery. Designing appropriate hats. Technique of handling 
materials and making of hats designed. Renovation of materials and 
trimmings; remodeling old hats. Millinery as a trade for women. Pre- 
requisite 241a, 130b. 

Rec. 1 ; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee $3.00. 

Household Administration 

470a. Household Management. Prerequisites Ec. Sci. 50 and 230; 
for H. Ec. and Ag. students, Ec. Sci. 50. 
Rec. 3; credit 3. 
471. Food: Marketing. 
Rec. 1 ; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee $5.00. 



20 



472b. Research. Field work in textile purchase. Prerequisites 134, 
472a. Fall, Winter or Spring. 
Hours arranged; credit 4-6. 

Household Science 

355. Meal Planning. Prerequisite 352a. 

Rec. 1 ; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3 ; fee $5.00. 

360. House Planning. Prerequisite 130b. 

Rec. 1 ; labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3 ; fee $2.00. 

351a. Advanced Food Preparation. Prerequisite 90 hours of food 
work in an accredited high school. 

Rec. 1 ; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee $5.00. 

352a. Nutrition and Dietetics. First three weeks. Prerequisite Chem. 
802, H. Ec. 350b or 351b. 

Rec. 2; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 4; fee $5.00. 

357a. Institutional Foods. Prerequisite 350b or 351a. 

Rec.-l; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee arranged. 

Vocational Education 

122. Teaching Home Economics. This course is a Summer School 
adaptation of the regular course in special methods and practice teaching. 
It is planned for teachers of home economics in grades and high schools. 
It includes a study of the choice of suitable subject matter, method of 
presentation, equipment, illustrative material, and a comparison of the 
more recent text books designed for grade and high school classes. 
Special study will be made of problems in vocational Home Economics. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

124. Technique of Teaching College Home Economics. Grading, 
motivation, testing, selection of subject matter, etc. Conference course. 

Credit 3. 



HORTICULTURE 

71a. General Horticulture. 

Lectures 3; lab. and lecture 1, 2 hr. or lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 4; fee $1.00. 

75a. Plant Propagation. Prerequisites Bot. 200 and Hort. 71 ; for 
students in Agric. and Manual Training, Hort. 71. 

Lectures 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee $1.00. 

78. Research. Special topics for minor or major graduate work per- 
taining to general horticulture or plant breeding. May be presented in 
form of thesis. 

Credit 1 to 10. 

178. Research. Special investigation in pomology for major or minor 
graduate work. May be presented in form of thesis. 

Credit 1 to 10. 

278. Research. Special investigation for major or minor graduate 
work. May be presented in form of thesis. 

Credit 1 to 10? 

365. Vegetable Growing. Home vegetable production ; planning the 
garden; handling cold frames and hot bed sash; sowing the seed; culti- 
irating and harvesting the more important vegetable as grown in Iowa. 
Lectures, reference reading and practical work in the greenhouse and 
gard< 

Lectures 2 or 1 ; lab. 1, 3 hrs. 

378. Research. Special investigation in truck crops and market gar- 



21 

dening, for major or minor graduate work. May be presented in form of 
thesis. 

Credit 1 to 10. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. College Algebra. The first four weeks are devoted to a review of 
Algebra up to and including quadratics, followed by the usual topics of 
College Algebra. 

Recitations 4 or 5 ; credit 4 or 5. 

la. Algebra (one-half time). This course covers the work taken up 
during the first part of College Algebra and is devoted to a review of the 
fundamental principles of Algebra up to and including quadratic equations. 
It is an excellent preparation for any student planning to enter college 
from a non-accredited high school and the record will be taken in lieu of 
the entrance examination in mathematics for such students. For those 
who have been out of high school for a number of years and need review 
or for teachers desiring to take examinations for certificates, it will prove 
a very desirable course. It should not be taken by those who have not 
had at least a year of work in algebra in high school or its equivalent. 
Xo college credit is given. . 

2. Plane Trigonometry. 
Prerequisite 1 ; recitations 5 ; credit 5. 

3. Plane Analytical Geometry. 
Prerequisite 2; recitations 4 to 5 ; credit 4 to 5. 
5b, 5c. Calculus. Differential and Integral. 
Prerequisite 3; recitations 3 to 5 ; credit 3 to 5. 

13. Mathematics for Agricultural Students. Application of arith- 
metic, algebra, and trigonometry to problems arising in agriculture. Pre- 
requisite, entrance algebra. 

Rec. 4 to 5; credit 4 to 5. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

111. Mechanical Drawing. Use of drawing instruments, practice in 
lettering, detailing, and tracing. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 2. 

151. Projective Drawing. Projection of the point, line, and plane as 
applied in the preparation of general and detail engineering drawings. 
Prerequisite 111. 

Rec. 1 ; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3. 

171. Sketching and Drawing. Interpretation and reading of ortho- 
graphic and pictorial sketches of machine details and assemblies ; prepara- 
tion of working drawings. Prerequisite 151. 

Lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 2. 

173. Elementary Pattern Work. Simple patterns and core boxes for 
cast iron, brass, and aluminum castings. Prerequisite 143. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 2; fee $4.00. 

211. Working Drawings. Orthographic anq^ pictorial sketching^ of 
machines ; preparation of shop drawings, lettering, tracing, and blue print- 
ing. Prerequisite 171. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 2. 

213. Advanced Pattern Work. Special pattern work; gearing, sweep 
and molding machine work. Prerequisite 173. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 2; fee $3.00. 

241. Mechanisms. Study of mechanisms, cams, and linkages; loca- 






22 



tion of virtual centers, construction of velocity and acceleration diagrams. 
Prerequisite 211, or 171 for students in Manual Training, Trades and 
Industries. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 2. 

271. Elementary Machine Designing. General design and detail 
working drawings of complete simple machines. Prerequisite 241. 

Lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 1. 

272. Statics of Engineering. Principles of pure mechanics; statics of 
rigid bodies and flexible cords; center of gravity and moment of inertia. 
Prerequisite Math. 5b. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

273. Pipe Fitting. Steam fitting and plumbing, cutting and making up 
threaded, flanged, and leaded joints, radiator and trap connections. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 2; fee $3.00. 

313. Machine Work. Chipping, filing, scraping, babbiting, and fitting 
bearings; mill wrighting; plain turning and thread cutting. 
Labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 2 ; fee $3.00. 

MODERN LANGUAGE 

110a, 110c. Elementary French. The principles of pronunciation; 
grammar; reading of modern prose. Emphasis is* laid upon the oral and 
written use of the language. 

Rec. 4; credit 4. 

120a. Intermediate French. Reading of modern French prose, plays, 
and some verse ; grammar review and composition ; conversation. Pre- 
requisite 110. 

Rec. 4 or 3; credit 4 or 3. 

130a. French Composition and Conversation. Formal translation of 
some easy play or story; oral reproductions from articles in current mag- 
azines ; conversation. Prerequisite 120 or 125. 

Rec. 3 ; credit 3. 

MUSIC 

Members of the Summer School and others desiring musical instruction 
will be offered courses in Voice and Piano. The regular Summer Course 
in music will consist of three lessons a week, private lessons. These les- 
sons are extra and not included in the regular college fee and must be 
arranged for with the director of the School of Music. The fees are 
payable in advance at the Treasurer's Office. 

Anyone desiring a lesser number of lessons than the regular Summer 
Course will pay a slightly higher rate than the following prices : 

Three lessons a week in Voice, $21.50 for six weeks., 

Tliree lessons a week in Piano, $21.50 for six weeks. 

The practice pianos of the School of music will be at the disposal of 
students at the following rates : One hour a day for the six weeks or less, 
$1.50; two hours a day, $2.50; three bours a day, $3.50. 

These arc- the regular rates charged in this department during the col L 
lege year. For further details address, 

Archibald A. Bati.ey, 
Director, School of Music. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

200. Swimming. Instruction for beginners only. 
Labs. 1 hr.; fee $2.00. 

201. Diving and Life Saving. 

Labs. 3, 1 hr.; fee $2.00. 

Swimming pool open afternoons for all who can swim. Those who 



23 

take only swimming in Summer School will be charged only the $2.00 
registration fee. Regulation suits required. 

202. Folk Dancing and Games. 

Labs. 2, 1 hr. ; fee $3.00. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

12a. Theory and Practice of Coaching. Football, Baseball, Track 
and Basketball. Theory of Play. Sportsmanship. Rules. Training. 
Physiology. Anatomy. Hygiene. Actual Competition. Actual Coaching. 

Lecture 1 ; Labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 2. 

PHYSICS 

101. Mechanics and Heat. Fundamental principles and their applica- 
tions. Prerequisite Math. 2 or 13. 

Lectures 2; rec. 1; credit 3. 

106. General Physics. Mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity and 
applications. 

Lectures and rec. 3; credit 3. 

202. Mechanics and Heat. Force, work, energy, and power. Pre- 
requisite Math. 2. 

Lectures and rec. 3; credit 3. 

203. Electricity. Prerequisite 202. 
Lectures and rec. 3; credit 3. 

204. Sound and Light. Prerequisite 203. 
Lectures and rec. 3; credit 3. 

208. Mechanics and Heat. Prerequisite Math. 2. 
Lectures 2; rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 5; fee $1.50. 
210. Sound and Light. Prerequisite 209. 
Lectures 2; rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 5; fee $1.50. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

1. General Psychology. Study of the normal adult human mind. 

Rec. 5; credit 5. 

14. Mental Tests. Their application in vocational and industrial 
guidance and selection. Very important for teachers, employers, and vo- 
cational counselors. Prerequisite 1 or 5. 

Rec. 2; credit 2. 

20. Educational Psychology. A treatment of special phases of Gen- 
eral and Genetic Pyschology which are most applicable to education. 
20 may be taken as 20a and 20b together. 

Rec. 4; credit 4. 

25. Childhood and Adolescence. Characteristics of childhood; crit- 
ical changes of early adolescence. Suggestions for parents, the Study 
Club, Parent-teacher associations. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

22. The Fundamentals of Public Speaking. Attention is especially 
given to voice building and expression. 

Rec. 2; credit 2. 

23. Interpretation. Methods of vocal interpretation, criticism, and 



24 

delivery. Each student is instructed privately at stated intervals through- 
out the quarter. Rcc. 3; credit 3. 

30. Extempore Speech. The fundamental principles of sneech or- 
ganization and delivery. 



Rec. 2 or 3; credit 2 or 3. 



SOILS 



151. Soils. Identification, mapping and description of soil types. Ori- 
gin and classification. Soil areas, types and problems in Iowa. 
Recitations 2; lab. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 3i; fee $2.50. 

171. Special Problems in Soil Physics. Experiments dealing with 
the physical properties of soils and their effect on crop production. 
Investigations 9 hrs. ; credit 3; fee $2.50. 

251. Soil Fertility. General principles of fertility. Studies of sam- 
ples of soil from the home farm or any other soil. 

Prerequisite Chem. 751; rec. 2; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 3J; fee $3.00. 

252. Manures and Fertilizers. Farmyard manure. Commercial fer- 
tilizers, incomplete and complete. Influence on soil fertility. 

Prerequisite 251; rec. 2; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 3J; fee $3.00. 

271. Special Problems in Soil Fertility. Experiments dealing with 
the problem of maintaining and increasing the crop producing power of 
soils. 

Investigations 9 hrs.; credit 3; fee $3.00. 

281. Research in Soil Fertility. Experiments to test the efficiency 
of certain treatments ; value of fertilizing materials. 

Credit 1 to 10; fee $3.00. 

351. Soil Bacteriology. (Bact. 351.) Occurrence and activities of 
soil bacteria and a consideration of their influence on soil fertility. 

Prerequisite Bact. 3b ; rec. 3 ; labs. 3, 2 hr. ; credit 5 ; fee $3.00. 

352. Soil Bacteriology. (Bact. 352.) Bacterial activities in relation 
tcr soil fertility. 

Lectures 3; credit 3. 

371. Special Problems in Soil Bacteriology. (Bact. 371.) Experi- 
ments dealing with bacterial activities in soil and their effect on fertility. 

Investigations 9 hrs.; credit 3; fee $3.00. 

451. Soil Management. Productiveness of particular types or classes 
of soils ; utilization ; soil conservation ; special soils. 

Prerequisite 251 ; recitations 3 ; credit 3. 

381. Research in Soil Bacteriology. (Bact. 381.) Field, greenhouse 
or laboratory experiments on bacterial activities in the soil. 

Credit 1 to 10; fee $3.00. 

481. Research in Soil Management. Soil management under live-? 
stock, grain, mixed or truck systems of farming. 

Credit 1 to 10. 

571. Special Problems in Soil Surveying. Study of problems enj 
countered in surveying and mapping soils and the classification of types. 

Investigation 9 hrs.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 



TRADES AND INDUSTRY 

14. Studies in Elementary Shopwork. Shop organization, wood 
technology courses of study, tools and equipment. The object of this 



course is to furnish the student a foundation for teaching Junior High 
School shopwork. Prerequisite, preceded or accompanied by 23. 

Lectures and recitations 3; credit 3. 

23. Elementary Woodwork. Care and adjustment of tools, prin- 
ciples of planing, squaring and simple construction. Making of projects 
for instruction purposes. Prerequisite, accompanied by 14. 

Labs. 3, 3 hrs. ; credit 3 ; fee $5.00. 

142. Studies in Vocational Education. This course is planned 
to meet the needs of Smith-Hughes teachers and enable them to handle 
farm shopwork as outlined by the^ State Board of Vocational Education. 
Prerequisite, preceded or accompanied by 26. 

Lectures and recitations 3 ; credit 3. 

26. Advanced Woodwork. Continuation of 23 including the 
study of power tools and their uses in school shops, cabinet making and 
joinery. Projects for Smith-Hughes classes. 

Lab's. 3, 3 hrs. ; credit 3 ; fee $5.00. 

18. Furniture Making. A shop course in furniture making to 
accompany T.I. 20. Emphasizes principles of good construction, propor- 
tion of parts, inlaying and turning as decorative features. Prerequisite, 
23 and 26 or equivalent. 

Labs. 3, 3 hrs. ; credit 3 ; fee $5.00. 

20. Lectures and Demonstrations in Upholstery, Wood Fin- 
ishing, Furniture Design and Surface Decoration. Advanced work for 
teachers of manual arts designed to extend their woodworking knowledge 
by related subject matter. Prerequisite, preceded or accompanied by 18. 

Lectures and recitations 3 ; credit 3. 

27. Building Construction. Elements of carpentry and building, 
principles of design and construction. Outside work on actual buildings. 
The course is strictly vocational in character and intended to continue the 
work of course 26 for Smith-Hughes teachers. Prerequisites 23 and 26 
or equivalent. 

Labs. 3, 3 hrs. ; credit 3. 

16. Auto Mechanics for Vocational Teachers. This course is 
intended for men preparing to teach automobile work in vocational 
schools. It consists of two units of six weeks each covering general en- 
gine operation and repair," chassis repair and special instruction in light- 
ing, starting and ignition. Students taking this course may take one 
other class room subject provided hours can be arranged. 

Lectures and recitations 3; labs. 3, 3 hrs.; fee $5.00 for each unit. Credit 
6 for each unit of the course. 

1. Vocational Drawing. Elementary mechanical drawing for vo- 
cational teachers. 

Labs. 2, 3 hrs. ; credit 2. 

2. Advanced Vocational Drawing. Drawing and methods of 
presentation and outlining of drawing courses for vocational schools. 
Prerequisite, Vocational Drawing 1 or equivalent. 

Labs. 2, 3 hrs. ; credit 2. 

VETERINARY ANATOMY 

713. Research in Anatomy. Problems relating to Animal Husbandry, 
Phy-iology, Pathology, and Surgery. Anatomical problems of systemic, 
topographic, or comparative nature. 

Lab. 3 or 4; credit 3 or 4. 

714. Research in Microscopic Anatomy. Physiological histology; 
problems of importance to pathology, or those relating to histogenesis or 

phology. 






26 



VETERINARY PHYSIOLOGY 



715. Research in Physiology. Research in physiological subjects rel- 
ative to veterinary science. 



VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

51. Methods of Teaching Vocational Subjects. 
Rec. 3; credit 3. 

52. High School Problems. Organization, management, and prob- 
lems of the present day high school. 

Rec. 3 ; credit 3. 

53. The Industrial High School. Sources and development of the 
high school curriculum, with particular reference to the' industrial and 
vocational subjects. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

54. Principles of Vocational Education. Fundamental principles ap- 
plied to vocational subjects. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

55. History of Industrial and Vocational Education. Chief em- 
phasis upon the modern movement. 

Rec. 3 ; credit 3. 

57. Vocational Education. Development and present best practice, 
pre-vocational education, and vocational guidance. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

58. Rural Education. With particular reference to the interests of 
the county superintendents, the normal training teacher, and the super- 
inendent or teacher in the consolidated or village school. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

110. School Administration and Supervision. Modern methods for 
the teacher of agriculture, who is constantly being used in the consolidated 
and smaller town systems of the state as principal or superintendent. 

Prerequisite 51 ; rec. 3; credit 3. 

120. Research in Education. Problems for the advanced student. 
(a) Courses of study in Agriculture: The organization of Secondary 
Courses in Agriculture on a problem or vocational basis, and adapted to 
local conditions, (b) Vocational and Industrial Surveys: To form an 
intelligent basis for the organization of vocational courses in agriculture, 
home economics, trade and industry. Hours by appointment. 

122. Teaching Home Economics. Special methods of teaching home 
economics, from the standpoint of the special teacher and supervisor. A 
summer session adaptation of the special methods features of course 121a. 

Rec. 3 ; credit 3. 

124. Technique of Teaching College Home Economics. Grading, 
motivation, testing, selection of subject matter, etc. 

Conference course; credit 3. 

132a. Teaching Agriculture. Special methods of teaching agricul- 
ture, from the standpoint of the experienced teacher and supervisor. A 
summer session adaptation of the Special methods work of course 131a. 

R< c. 3; credit 3. 

132b. Teaching Agriculture. Continuation of 132a. 

Rec. 3 ; credit 3. 

142. Teaching Manual Training, Trade and Industry. Courses of 
Study, lesson plans, demonstrations, organization and administration of 
Smith-Hughes work. Prerequisites 51 and 52. 

Rec. -'nid |ab. 3; credit 3. 






ZOOLOGY 

101a. Human Physiology. Fundamentals of physiology, anatomy and 
morphology of the various systems as they occur in the human mechanism, 
with theoretical and practical applications. Practical dissections of se- 
lected materials and technique of physiological experimentation form an 
integral part of the laboratory work. Adapted to the needs of Home Eco- 
nomics students and others who desire fundamental knowledge and train- 
ing in the science. By special arrangement teachers and others may take 
certains portions for more or less credit than here specified, according to 
work completed. 

Lecture 2; lab. 1, 3 hr; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

180. Elementary Research in Physiology. Applied physiology for 
advanced undergraduates and graduates. Individual problems to begin 
research and find the literature. Prerequisites 101 and 110 or 111, pref- 
erably all. 

Conferences and assignment. Credit 1 to 3 according to work done. 

181. Advanced Research in Physiology. For graduates. Investiga- 
tion in some physiological subject suitable for a thesis. As arranged. 

380. Research. In Economic Entomology. Hours and credits to be 
arranged. A. For undergraduates. B. For graduate students. 

408. Methods of Apiary Practice. Sources of nectar and pollen ; 
supplies and apparatus. Prerequisite 407. 

Rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee $3.00. 

GRADUATE WORK IN SUMMER SCHOOL 

The student expecting to do graduate work in summer school will find 
a more detailed account of methods of matriculations and requirements 
for degrees in the graduate catalogue, which may be had on request from 
the college registrar or from the dean of the Graduate College. 

Graduate Enrollment 

Graduates of approved colleges may be admitted to graduate standing 
in Iowa State College by filling out duplicate blank applications for ad- 
mission and filing these together with a complete authoritative transcript 
of college records, including entrance credits. Upon approval of the ap- 
plication a matriculation card will be issued by the college registrar. En- 
rollment in graduate work does not necessarily imply candidacy for a 
degree. 

After registration in the Graduate College the student may be admitted 
to candidacy for a degree after total residence of at least 12 weeks or one 
quarter, providing the specific prerequisite requirements of the depart- 
ment in which major work is to be taken have been met. This must be 
done at least one quarter before the conferring of a master's degree, and 
one year (or in exceptional cases two quarters) before the conferring of 
a doctor's degree. 

Advanced Degrees 

Master of Science in Agriculture. Teachers of agriculture and 
others who are graduates of standard college courses in agriculture may 
take work looking toward the degree Master of Science in various phases 
of agriculture, such as Animal Husbandry, Horticulture, Farm Crops, 
Soils, Dairviny, Farm Management, Agricultural Engineering and Agri- 
cultural Education. 

Master of Science in Vocational Education. Graduates of standard 
colleges in non-technical courses who have had sufficient work in educa- 
tion and psychology to be eligible for a first grade state certificate may 
take major work in education, and minor work in agriculture, in home 



28 

economics, or in trades and industries looking toward the master's degree. 

Students who minor in agriculture must choose at least 30 quarter credit 
hours from the following agricultural subjects, (where one subject only is 
listed for a department this must be included, and at least half of the 
courses listed for each department when more than one are given must 
also be included). 

Animal Husbandry. 101. 2 credits; 102, 2 credits; 103, 2 credits; 111 
3| credits; 112, 3£ credits; 113, 3& credits. 

Farm Crops. 151, 4 credits; 152, 4 credits. 

Dairying. 15, 4 credits. 

Horticulture. 71, 4 credits. 

Soils. 151, 3J credits; 251, 3| credits; 252, 3£ credits. 

Any science prerequisites for particular subjects must be met. 

Students desiring to take minor work in trades and Industries (including 
manual training) must complete mathematics through analytical geometry, 
secure credit in the following subjects: 

Trade and Industry, 1, 2 credits (or M. E. Ill, 2 credits). 
Trade and Industry, 2, 2 credits (or M. E. 151, 3 credits). 
Trade and Industry, 14, 3 credits ; 23, 3 credits. 
Mechanical Engineering, 171, 3 credits; 313, 2 credits, 
and complete at least 15 hours in subjects chosen from the following list: 
Trades and Industries, 16, 5 credits ; 18, 3 credits ; 20, 3 credits ; 26, 

3 credits ; 27, 3 credits. 

Mechanical Engineering, 173, 2 credits; 211, 2 credits; 213, 2 cre- 
dits ; 272, 3 credits ; 273, 2 credits. 

Agricultural Engineering, 51, 2 credits; 52, 2 credits; 55, 2 credits; 

60, 4 credits ; 74, 2 credits. 

Students desiring to take minor work in home economics must com- 
plete at least 30 hours in subjects offered by this department. 

Master of Science in Home Economics. Graduates of standard 
courses in home economics may take work looking- toward the master's 
degree with major work in the departments of the Division of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Master of Science. Graduate students who have had adequate under- 
graduate preparation may take major work looking toward the degree 
Master of Science in Bacteriology, Botany, Entomology, Physiology, Plant 
Pathology, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Agricultural Economics. Rural 
Sociology, Agricultural History, Comparative Anatomy, Zoology, Geology, 
Comparative Physiology, Mathematics, or Physics. 

Doctor of Philosophy. Those who wish to pursue work in summer 
school looking toward the degree Doctor of Philosophy should secure in- 
formation as to requirements from the graduate catalogue. Many research 
problems can be undertaken to advantage during the summer season, par- 
ticularly in agriculture and the'sciences most closely related to agriculture. 

Requirements for Master's Degrees 
For the Degree Master of Science in Vocational Education. A 
minimum of thirty quarter credil hours must he completed in graduate 
subjects in the Department of Vocational Education, and an additional 
thirty quarter credit hours in agriculture, home economics or trades and 
industries as outlined abo 

For the Degree Master of Science in Other Subjects. \t least 
thirty quarter credit hours must he completed in graduate subjects in the 
major department, and not t< I IS quarter credit hours in minor 

graduate work, a total of at least -15 hour- 



g 



Residence Requirements. The minimum summer school residence for 
a master's degree is 24 weeks, or 4 six weeks sessions. Students taking 
graduate work in summer school may do not to exceed one-third of the 
work for the degree in absentia. For details concerning work clone in ab- 
sentia, see the graduate catalogue, or write the Dean of the Graduate Col- 
Subjects Given in Summer School for which Graduate Credit May 

be Secured 

Column I includes numbers of subjects offered to graduate students 
only, for major or minor credit. 

Column II includes numbers of subjects offered both to graduates and 
to advanced undergraduates, for cither major or minor credit. 

Column 111 includes numbers of subjects that may be taken for minor 
credit only, by graduate students. 

Column 1\" includes numbers of subjects that may be taken for minor 
credit only by students taking major work in vocational education (sec 
page 28). 

First Session 



Xatne of Department 


/ 


II 


III 


IV 


Agricultural 










Engineering 


106a, 106b 




61 


51, 52, 55,60 


Animal Husbandry 


500, 505, 510, 
515 




218 


101, 102, 103, 
111,112,113, 
224, 240, 241 


Bacteriology 


31b, 75, 173, 
262 




3a, 3b, 3c, 4 




B< itany 


148aC, 325, 
326, 416, 
481a, 604b 


325, 415 


320 




Chemistry 


521,563,765, 
803,841,901 




802 




Civil Engineering 


1109, 1110, 
1111, 1112 








Dairying 


80, 81, 82, 

143 


102 




15 


Economics 


350, 380, 159, 
160 


340 






Farm Crops 


281a, 281b, 
281c, 282, 
181, 182 




151,152,154, 
160 




Farm Management 


27 




22 




Forestry 










(in Colorado) 


91, 92, 93a 










450,510,520 








Hi-tory 


320 




124 




Home Economics 


353'^ 354?, 


135a, 135b, 


351b, 375a, 


130a, 130b, 




356b?, 472b? 


352a, 352b, 


471 


133a, 241a, 






355, 470a 




241b, 241c, 
343a, 360, 
351a, 122 


Horticulture 


78.178,278, 
378 






71a 


Trades & Industry 


_ 






1, 2, 14, 16, 

18, 20, 23, 
26, 27 



30 



Name of Department 


/ 


// 


III 


IV 


Mathematics 






5b, 5c 




Mechanical 








111,151,171, 


Engineering 








173,211,213, 
273, 313 


Physics 






208, 210 




Psychology 






14, 25 




Soils 


281,381,481, 
571 




151,251,252, 
351,352,451 




Veterinary Anatomy 


713,714 








Veterinary Physiology 


715 








Vocational Education 


120 


54, 58, 110, 
122, 132a, 
132b, 142 


51, 57 




Zoology & Entomology 


180, 181, 380, 
408 




101a 





Second Session 



Name of Department 



Agricultural 

Engineering 
Animal Husbandry 

Bacteriology 

Botany 

Civil Engineering 
Dairy 
Economics 
Farm Crops 



Farm Management 
Forestry 
History 
Horticulture 

Trades and Industries 

ology 

Soils 

\ ';' ational Education 
Zoology & Entomology 



107 
500,510,515 

31b, 75, 173, 
262 

148aC. 325, 
326, 416, 
481a, 604b 
1109, 1110, 
1111, 1112 
80, 81, 82, ' 
143 

159,160,350, 
380 

281a, 281b, 
281c, 282, 
181, 182 
27 

320 

78, 178, 278, 

378 



281,381,481 

571 

120a, 120b 

380, 408 



// 



55 



/// 



4? 



151, 152 



75a 



20 

151,251,252 

52, 53 



IV 



77, 79, 74 
111,112,113, 
400, 402 



76, 77 

365 

1,2, 18,20, 
23,26 



GENERAL COURSES 

The Iowa State College offers in the Summer Session, as during the 
regular year, courses of a non-collegiate grade to help groups who are 
particularly interested in the special lines of work offered by the College. 

During the summer these courses consist of home-makers' courses for 
mature women and special courses in agriculture and trades and industry 
for government students. These courses are described briefly below. 

HOME-MAKERS' COURSES 

The division of Home Economics will offer beginning and continuation 
courses of a very practical nature for home-makers of the state who may 
desire to take advantage of the summer work. This work has always 
been very popular because of its intensely practical nature and this sum- 
mer it has been decided to offer all courses coordinately, that is, without 
any prerequisite requirements. 

Women who desire to come for the first two weeks of the Summer 
School can secure available units of work in the home-makers' courses and 
have at the same time an opportunity of attending the Rural Life Con- 
ference, or they may find full schedule of valuable work in the conference 
course, description of which follows : 

N. 1A. Food Preparation Service — Principles of cookery; develop- 
ment of technique and skill ; planning, preparing and serving breakfasts.' 

Rec. 2; labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 4; fee $5.00. 

N. 10a. The Essentials of Sewing — Fundamental stitches; use and 
adjustment of sewing machine. Making of underwear and laboratory 
apron. Emphasis placed on choice of materials, designs and advantages of 
correctness of patterns. Study of cotton materials. Students provide ma- 
terials subject to approval. 

Rec. and labs. 2, 3 hr. and 1, 1 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.50. 

B. Use of sewing machine attachments. Development of skill in 

X. 10b. Use of Sewing Machine Attachments — Development of 
sewing. Emphasis on method of making, finishing, and altering commer- 
cial patterns to measurements. Study linen and silk. Students provide 
materials subject to approval. 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee $2.50. 

N. 20a. Millinery — Paper patterns, buckram and willow frames, select- 
ing, preparing, altering and covering commercial frames. Use of glue and 
stitches. Velvet, satin, sport and lace made. Trimmings and renovation. 
Students provide material subject to approval. - 

Rec. 1 ; labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3 ; fee $3.00. 

N. 30a. Design — Elementary Design : Principles of design, proportion, 
subordination, rhythm, balance; value of tones and color theory; perspec- 
tive. These fundamental principles are applied to simple abstract problems 
in lettering and spacing; furnish basis for specific problems. 

Rec. 1 ; labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSES 

The courses in Agriculture, Home Economics, Manual Training and 
Didactics, as formerly offered in the Summer Session for rural and grade 
teachers, have been discontinued for the general certificate subjects. Stu- 



32 

dents arc advised to attend the Iowa State Teachers' College or one of its 
special summer session branches, or some other summer session offering 
the general certificate subjects. 

First Grade Certificate Subjects. Teachers will find, however, at the 
Iowa State College an opportunity of preparing for examination in 
the first grade certificate subjects — algebra, physics, economics and civics. 
These subjects ma}' be pursued in regular college classes and, while the 
work is possibly more difficult than needed simply for the examination, 
yet many students are willing to do the additional work necessary to carry 
a regular college course. See especially the following in the descriptions 
of courses of the various departments and the schedule of recitations : 
Math, la, Hist. 124, Econ. 51, Phys. 202, 203, 204. 

Teachers who are high school graduates should arrange for entrance 
requirements, so that, after completing work in any college course, state- 
ment of credits may be received in the usual way. Teachers should be 
interested in an opportunity of attending the Iowa State College and 
taking work in the newer industrial subjects where there is abundant 
opportunity in Home Economics, Agriculture, Manual Training, related 
science and education. 



GOVERNMENT AND NON-COLLEGIATE COURSES IN 

AGRICULTURE, TRADES AND INDUSTRY, AND 

RELATED SUBJECTS 

A. E. N51. Forge Shop. Forge and welding iron and steel' Making, 
hardening and tempering small tools. Designed to be helpful in repair of 
farm equipment. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 2 ; fee $3.00. 

A. E. N52. Carpentry Shop. Use, care and sharpening of carpentry 
tools. Joining, framing and rafter cutting. Designed to be helpful in 
farm building, nlanning and construction. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.'; credit 2; fee $3.00. 

A.E. N61. Gas Engines and Tractors. To familiarize the student 
with the construction, operation, adjustment, and care of gasoline and oil 
engines and tractors. 

Prerequisite N60. Rec. 1 ; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $2.00. 

A.H. N101. Types and Market Classes of Beef and Dual-Purpose 
Cattle. Judging; study of types, carcasses, markets, and market classifi- 
cations. 

Rec. and labs. 2 : 2 hr. ; credit 2; fee $1.00. 

A.H.N111. Breeds of Beef and Dual-Purpose Cattle. Judging rep- 
resentativi of different breeds; origin, history, type, and adaptability of 
the br< 

Prerequisite N101. Rec. 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 3§; fee $1.00. 

A.II.X222. Live Stock Management. Elements and compounds of 
animal nutrition, digestion of food, feeding standards, feed stuffs, and 
animal feeding. 

\<>c 2; lab. L, 2 hr.; credit 2f; fee $2.00. 

Botanj XlOOa. Agricultural Botany. Life history of the plants as 
related to agriculture. 

Rec. 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2§; fee $1.00. 

Botany X 101. Farm Weeds and Seeds; Injurious Weeds. Seed anal- 

nd v. ' • '1 < radication. 
Lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 1 ; fee $1.00. 
Chemistry X67. Agricultural Chemistry. Chemistry of the farm re- 



33 

lating especially to the elements essential to plant life and animal feeding. 
Rec. 2; lab. I, 2 hr.; credit 2H ; fee $3.00. 

Dairy XI". Principles of Dairying. Secretion and composition of 
milk; testing of dairy products; separation and care of milk and cream; 
cheese-making, butter-making, and ice cream making. 

Rec. 3; lab. 1. 3 hr. ; credit 4; fee $2.00. 

English N30a. Practice of English. Training in note taking and out- 
lining. Writing of business letters. Attention to clearness and corrects :ss 
of expression. 

English N30c. Rhetoric and Composition. 
Rec. 3 ; credit 3. 

Farm Crops Nil. Corn Production. Adaptation of the corn plant. 
Various phases of corn growing; judging, breeding, feeding, marketing. 
Insects and diseases. 

Rec. 2; lee. and labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 4; fee $1.50. 

P.M. N51. Farm Accounts. Inventories, crop and livestock accounts 
and their interpretation. 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 2\\ fee $1.50. 

Math. X31a. Agricultural Arithmetic. Principles of Arithmetic needed 
in the practical problems of farm management. 
Rec. 3; credits 3. 

Soils N41. Soil Physics. Origin, formation, and classification of 
soils; drainage; treatment of alkali, gumbo, and peat. 
Rec. 2; lee. and lab. 1, 2 hr. ; credit 3; fee $1.00. 

Soils X52. Factors Influencing Success in Farming. 
Prerequisite N51. Rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. ; credit 4; fee $1.00. 

Math, X35a. Plane Geometry. 
Rec. 4 ; credit 4. 

Math. X37b. Algebra. 
Rec. 5 ; credit 5. 

T. I. Xlc. Mechanical Drafting. Drawing. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 2. 

T. I. Nib. Mechanical Drafting. Drawing. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 2. 

T. I. X2a, N2b. Shop Work Woodwork. Use, sharpening and ad- 
justment of hand tools; elementary framing and joinery; wood turning 
and use of tools. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 2; fee $5.00. 

T. I. N7a, N7b, N7c. Shop Work. Use of hand tools, chipping, filing, 
scraping, and pipe fitting. Use of lathe, shaper, drill press, etc. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $5.00. 

SUGGESTIONS TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

1. Read carefully the description of the various courses and other mat- 
ter m this bulletin, and if the information is not sufficiently specific, do not 
hesitate to write for particulars. 

2. Upon your arrival at the depot at Ames, make yourself known to a 
member of the Reception Committee, who will be recognized by the col- 
lege badge. If for any reason you miss the committee, take the college car 
to the college, and get off at Central Station. Men go direct to Alumni 
Hall, women to Margaret Hall. Room assignments will be made at these 



34 



buildings. After securing a room, you arc ready for registration. If you 
come on the Intcrurban, get off at the Campus. 

3. The following is the plan of registration : 

(1) Go to the Registrar's office, fill out the two cards there fur- 
nished you, pay the Summer Session fee, and obtain a receipt. 

(2) From the Registrar's office, yon will be directed with reference 
to classifying officers.-* Complete classification. 

(3) If any of your courses carry laboratory fees, fee cards may 
be secured from the instructors, and fees paid at the Treasurer's 
office. 

4. There are ample accommodations, and advanced notice is not neces- 
sary. The college has been accustomed to handling 4,000 students during 
the regular year. However, if your plans are matured sufficiently early, 
it will assist in rapid assignment and registration if advanced notice is 
given. 






SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS 



Where schedules can he changed to the advantage of some students 
without inconvenience to others, changes will be made on Monday evening, 
June 14. 

Recitations daily unless otherwise specified. 

Abbreviations: .V Ed.— Agricultural Education. A. E- — Agricultural Engineering.. 
A. J. — Agricultural Journalism. Ag. H. — Agricultural Hall. A. G. — Auto Garage. 
A. ii. — Animal Husbandry. Bac. — Bacteriology. Bot. — Botany. Cen. — Central Build- 
ing. Chem. — Chemistry. C. B. — Chemistry Building. C. E- — Civil Engineering. 
C. S. — Carpenter Shop. D. B. — Dairy Building. Econ. — Economics. En. A. — En- 
gineering Annex. En. IT. — Engineering Hall. Eng. — English. F. C. — Farm Crops. 
F. Mang. — Farm Management. For. — Forestry. F. S. — Forge Shop. Geo. — Geology. 
Gym. — Gymnasium. H. E- — Home Economics. H. E. B. — Home Economics Building. 
Hist. — History. Hort. — Horticulture. Lab. — Laboratory. Lit. — Literature. M. H. — 
Margaret Hall. Math. — Mathematics. M. E. — Mechanical Engineering. M. Lang. — 
Modern Language. M. T. — Manual Training. O. A. — Old Agricultural Hall. Pav. — 
Pavilion. P. E. — Physical Education. P. S. — Pattern Shop. Phys. — Physics. 
Psych. — Psychology. Pub. Sp. — Public Speaking. R. — Room. Rec. — Recitation. 
Sc. B. — Science Building. T. I. — Trades and Industries. Trans. B. — Transportation 
Building. Vet. An. — Veterinary Anatomy. Vet. Ph. — Veterinary Physiology. Zool. — 
Zoology. 

COLLEGIATE COURSES 

(First Half) 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


A. E. 51 




Lab. 9-12 M. W. F. S. 




F. S. 


A. E. 52 




Lab. 1-4 M. T. Th. F. 




c. s. 


A. E. 55 




Lab. 2-5 M. W. F. S. 




F. S. 


A. E. 60 




Rec. 8, Lab. 2-5 T. Th. 




204 O. A. 


A. E. 61 




Rec. 1 M. W., Lab. 2-5 M. W. F 


. s. 


204 O. A. 


A. E. 106a, 


i06b 


As arranged 






A. T. 28a 




Rec. 7 




19 Ag. H. 


A. T. 29a 




Rec. 8 




19 Ag. H. 


A. H. 101 




Lab. 7-9, 3-5 M. W. F. S. 




Pav. 2 


A. H. 102 




Lab. 10-12 M. W. F. S. 




Pav. 2 


A. H. 103 




Lab. 1-3 M. W. F. V S. 




Pav. 2 


A. H. Ill 




Lee. 9 M. W. F. S., Lab. 7-9 M. 
F. S. 


w. 


117 Ag. H. 


A. H. 112 




Lee. 9 M. W. F. S., Lab. 10-12 
W. F. S. 


M. 


109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 113 




Lee. 3 M. W. F. S., Lab. 1-3 M. 
- F. S. 


W. 


109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 218 




Lee. 8 




109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 224 




Lee. 11 M. T. F. S, Lab. 7-9 T. 


Th. 


109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 240 




Lee. 10 and 4 daity, except Sat. 




109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 241 




Rec. 2 




109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 500, 


505, 








510, 515 




As arranged 






Bac. 3a, 3b, 


3c 


Lee. 10, Lab. 8-12 as arranged 




105 vSc. B. 


Bac. 4 




Lee. 7, Lab. 8-12 as arranged 




105 Sc. B. 


Bac. 31a, 31b, 75. 








173, 262 




As arranged 






Bot. 135 




Rec. 4 T. Th, Lab. 3-5 M. W. F 


. S. 


312 Cen. 


Bot.320 




Rec. 7 M. W. F. S, Lab. 9-12 




312 Cen. 


Bot. 415a 




Rec. 11 M. W. F. S, Lab. 1-4 
W. F. S. 


M. 


312 Cen. 


Bot. 148aC, 


325, 








326, 415b, 


416, 








481a. 604r 


, 609 


As arranged 







36 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS— continued 



Chem. 502 




Rec. 8, Dab. 10-12 T. Th. S. 


286 C. B. 


Chem. 503 




Rec. 2, Lab. 8-10 M. W. F. 


286 C. B. 


Chem. 504 




Rec. 9 M. T. W. F., Lab. 10-12 


286 C. B. 


Chem. 751a 




Rec. 10 M. T. W. Th, Lab. 8-10 M 








W. F. S. 


286 C. B. 


Chem. 751b 




Rec. 11 T. W. Th. F, Lab. 7-11 T. 








Th. 


286 C. B. 


Chem. 752 




Rec. 2 T. W. Th. F., Lab. 7-11 T. Th. 


125 C. B. 


Chem. 775 




Rec. 11 Lab, 8-11 M. F. 


125 C. B. 


Chem. 776 




Rec. 2, Lab. 8-11 M. W. F. S. 


181 C. B. 


Chem. 802 




Rec. 9, Lab. 10-12 


125 C. B. 


Chem. 563, 


803, 






841, 765, 901 


As arranged 




C. E. 1109, 1110, 






1111, 1112 




As arranged 




Dairy 15 




Lee. 7, Lab. 1-4 T. Th. 


11 D. B. 


Dairy 60 




Lee. 4 M. T. Th. F, Lab. 1-4 M. W 


25 D. B. 


Dairy 80, 81 


82, 






102, 143 




As arranged 




Econ. 50 




Rec. 4 


307 Ag. H. 


Econ. 315 




Rec. 3 


307 Ag. H. 


Econ. 159, 160, 






340, 350, 380 


As arranged 




Eng. 19 




Rec. 9 


! Cen. 


Eng. 21 




Rec. 10 


* Cen. 


Eng. 251a" 




Rec. 3 


1 Cen. 


Eng. 441 




Rec. 1 


102 Cen. 


F. C. 151 




Rec. 1, Lab. 7-10 M. W. 


m Ag. h. 


F. C. 152 




Rec. 11, Lab. 7-10 T. F. 


307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 153 




Rec. 1 M. W. F. S., Lab. 7-10 Th. S. 


306 Ag. H. 


F. C. 154 




Rec. 10, Lab. 2-5 T. Th. 


307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 160, 


181, 






182,281a, 281b, 






281c, 282 




As arranged 




F. Mang. 22 




Rec. 10, Lab. 3-5 M. W. F. 


306 Ag. H. 


F. Mang. 27 




As arranged 




Forestry 78, 


79, 






91, 92, 93a 




As arranged 


Summer Camp 


Geo. 450, 510, 


520 


As arranged 




Hist. 110 




Rec. 11 


208 Cen. 


Hist. 214 




Rec. 2 


208 Cen. 


320 




As arranged 




H. E. 122 




Rec. 8 


206 H. E. B. 


ir. I-;. 130a 




Rec. 11 M. Th, Lai). 8-11 T. W. Th. 








F. 


\rt Studio 


H. E. 1301) 




Rec. 11 T, 1 F, Lab. 1-4 M. T. W. 








Tb. 


\rt Studio 


IT. 1-;. 133a 




Rec. 11 M. Th, Lab. 8-11 M. T. \V. 








Th. 


\rt Studio 


lb !•;. 135a 




Rec. 11 W, 9 Th, Lab. 8-11 M. T. 








W. F. 


\rt Studio 


If. K. 241a 




Rec. 9 M„ 1 K, Lab. 1-4 M. T. W. 








'I'll. 


110 H. E. B. 


If. Iv 2Mb 




Rec. 11 M. F., Lab. 8 11 T. W. Th. 
F 


110 H. E. B. 


PI. !•. 241c 




Rec. 11 M. Th, Lab. 8-11 T. W. 








Th. F. 


102 H. E. B. 



37 



H. E. 243a 


Rec. 1 M., 11 F., Lab. 1-4 T. 


W.l 






Th. F. 




100 H. E. B. 


H. E. 351a 


Rec. 11 M, 1 E, Lai). 1-4 M. T. 


w. 






'Ph. 




20X 11. E. \). 


H. E. 352a 


Rec. 8 T. W. Th. F, Lab. 9-1- 


1 T. 






VV. Th. F. 




200 H. E. B. 


11. E. 353 


As arranged 






11. E. 355 


Rec. 8 T. Th., Lab. 9-12 T. W. 


Th. 






F. 




202 H. E. B. 


H. E. 357a 


Rec 8 T. Th., Lab. 9-12 T. W. 


Th. 






F. 




10 H. E. B. 


11. E. 360 


Rec. 11 W. F., Lab. 1-4 M. T. W. 


Th. 


202 H. E. B. 


11. E. 470a 


Rec. 8 




10 H. E. B. 


H. E. 471 


Rec. 1 F, 11 T., Lab. 1-4 M. T 


\Y. 






Th. 




202 H. E. B. 


11. E. 472b, 124, 








500, 510 


As arranged 






Hurt. 71a 


Rec. 10, Lab. 2-5 T. Th. 




207 Ag. H. 


Hort. 7t, 178, 








27X, 37S 


As arranged 






Math, la 


Rec. 8 




213 Cen. 


Math. 1 


Rec. 7, and 1 M. T. Th. F. 




214 Cen. 


Math. 2 


Rec. 9, and 3 M. T. W. F. 




214 Cen. 


Math. 3 


Rec. 7, and 3 M. T. W. F. 




213 Cen. 


Math. 51) 


Rec. 7. and 2 M. T. Th. F. 




215 Cen. 


Math. 5c 


Rec. 8, and 2 M. T. Th. F. 




214 Cen. 


Math. 13 


Rec. & and 1 T. Th. 




215 Cen. 


M. E. Ill 


As arranged 8-12- 




403 En. H. 


M. E. 151 


Rec. 8 M. W., Lab. as arranged 8-1 


403 En. H. 


M. E. 171 


As arranged 8-12 




403 En. H. 


M. E. 173 


As arranged 1-5 




P. S. 


M. E. 211 


As arranged 8-12 




403 En. H. 


M. E. 213 


As arranged 8-12, 1-5 




P. S. 


M. E. 241 


As arranged 8-12 




403 En. FT. 


M. E. 271 


As arranged 8-12 




403 En. H. 


M. E. 272 


Lee. 10 




205 En. H. 


M. E. 273 


Lab. 1-4 M. W. Th. F. 




M. S. 


M. E. 313 


Lab. 9-12 M. W. Th. F. 




U. S. 


M. Lang. 110a 


Rec. 7, and 2 hrs. as arranged 




119 Cen. 


M. Lane. 110c 


Rec. 8, and 2 hrs. as arranged 




119 Cen. 


M. Lang. 120a 


Rec. 8 




118 Cen. 


M. Lang. 130a 


Rec. 9 




118 Cen. 


r. I-.. 200 


Lab. 4 or 5 M. \Y. F., or 4 or 


5 T. 






Th. S. 




M. H. Gym. 


P. E. 201 


Lab. 3 M. \Y. F. 




M. H. Gym. 


]'. E. 202 


Lab. 3 T. Th. 




M. H. Gym. 


I\ T. 12a 


Lab. 4-6 dailv, except Sat. 




Gym. 


h. 1 


Rec. 8, and 4 M. T. W. F. 




210 Cen. 


h. 25 


Rec. 11 




210 Cen. 


li. 14 


Rec. 1 M. T. \Y. F. 




210 Cen. 


Phys. 101 


Rec. and Lee. 2 




207 En. H. 


Phvs. 106 


As arranged 






Phys. 202, 203, 








204 


Rec. 8 and 1, Lab. 9-12 




207 En. H. 


Phys. 208 


Rec. 9 M. T.Th. F. and 2 M. T.T1 


i. E 






Lal>. 9-12 am- two days 




209 En. II. 


Phys. 210 


Rec. 8, and 1 T. Th., Lab. 9-12 W. 







or as arranged 




209 En. H. 



: 



38 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS— continued 



Pub. Sp. 22 


Rec. 10 M. T. Th. F. 


311 Cen. 


Pub. Sp. 23 


Rec. 7 




311 Cen. 


Pub. Sp. 30 


Rcc. 11 




311 Cen. 


Soils 151 


Rec. 8 M. W. F. S., 


Lab. 10-12 M, 






W. F. S. 




7 Ag. H. 


Soils 251 


Rec. 9 M. W. F. S. 


, Lab. 1-3 M. W. 






F. S. 




7 Ag. H. 


Soils 252 


Rec. 10 M. W. F. 


S, Lab. 3-5 M. 






W. F. S. 




7 Ag. H. 


Soils 351 


Rec. 8, Lab. 2-4 




24 Ag. H. 


Soils 352 


Rec. 8 




12 Ag. H. 


Soils 451 


Rec. 1 




7 Ag. H. 


Soils 171. 271, 








281, 371, 381, 








481, 571 


As arranged 






T. I. 1 


Lab. 8-11 M. T. Tl 


L F. 


En. A. 


T. I. 2 


Lab. 1-4 M. T. Th. 


F. 


En. A. 


T. I. 14 


Rec. 1 




207 Trans. B. 


T. I. 16 


Lee. 8, Lab. 9-12 




\. G. 


T. I. 18 


Lab. 8-11 




P. S. 


T. I. 20 


Rec. 7 




207 Trans. B. 


T. I. 23 


Lab. 2-5 




A. G. 


T. I. 26 


Lab. 8-11 




A. E. Shop 


T. I. 27 


Lab. 2-5 




\„ G. 


T. I. 142 


Rec. 11 




207 Trans. B. 


Vet. An. 713, 714 


As arranged 






Vet. Ph. 715 


" As arranged 






Voc. Ed. 51 


Rec. 2 




210 Ag. H. 


Voc. Ed. 54 


Rec. 7 




207 Ag. H. 


Voc. Ed. 58 


Rec. 4 




210 Ag. H. 


Voc. Ed. 110 


Rcc. 9 




306 Ag. H. 


Voc. Ed. 122 


Rcc. 8 




206 H. E. B. 


Voc. Ed. 124 


As arranged 






Voc. Ed. 132a 


Rec. 10 




208 Ag. H. 


Voc. Ed. 132b 


Rec. 2 




208 Ag. H. 


Voc. Ed. 142 


Rec. 11 




207 Trans. B. 


Zool. 101a 


Rcc. 1 M. T. Th. 


F, Lab. 2-4 M. 






W. F. 




308 Sc. B. 


Zool. 180. 181, 








380, 408 


As arranged 







NON-COLLEGIATE COURSES 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


A. E. NS1 


Lab. 9-12, 1-4 T. Th. 


F. S. 


A. K. N52 


Lab. 9-12, 1-4 W S.. 


C. S. 


\ K N61 


Lee. 9 M. W, Lab. 9-12 T. Th. 


204 O. A. 


Them. K(>7 


As arranged 


C. B. 


Eng. N30a 


Rec. 10 


C. 1'.. 


kng. N30c 


Rec. 11 


101 C. B. 


| r Ml 


Lee. 8 M. T. W. Th., bah. 13 M. T. 






Th. and 10-12 F. 


407 O. A. 


! ; .\l;.l,:v N51 


Lee. 10 T. Tl.., Lab, 10-12 M. W. 






F S. 


307 0. V 


F. Mane. N52 


Lee. 8, Lab. 1-4 T. Th. 


308 O. A. 



3» 



Math. X31 


Rec. 11 


C. B. 


Math. N35a 


Rec. 10, and 1 T. W. 


218 Cen. 


Math. N37b 


Rec. 10 and 4 T. \Y. Th. F. 


218 Cen. 


H. K. Nla 


Rec. 8, M.W. F. S., Lab. 8-11 T. W. 






Th. F. 


Art Studio 


H. E. NlOa 


Rec 9 M., 1 F, Lab. 1-4 M. T. W. 






Th. 


110 H. E. B. 


H. E. XlOb 


Rec. 11 M. F., Lab. 8-11 T. W. Th. F. 


110 H. E. B. 


H. E. N20a 


Rec. 1 M, 11 F, Lab. 1-4 T. W. 






Th. F. 


Ill H. E. B. 


H. E. N30a 


Rec. 11 M. Th, Lab. 8-11 T. W. 






Th. F. 


Art Studio 


Soils X41 


Lee. 9 M. T. W. Th, Lab. 1-3 W. F. 


407 O. A. 


T. I. Nlc, Nib 


Lab. 7-10 M. S, 1-4 M. F. 


303 En. A. 


T. I. X2a, N2b 


Lab. 7-10 and 2-5, or 1-4 T.W.Th.F. 


P. S. 


T. I. N7a, N7b, 






X7c 


Lab. 7-10 and 2-5, or 1-4 T.W.Th.F. 


C. S. 



COLLEGIATE COURSES 

(Second Half) 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


A. E. 79 


Rec. 1 M. T. Th. F, Lab. 2-5 M. W. 


204 O. A. 


A. E. 77 


Rec. 11 M. T. Th. F, Lab. 2-5 T. Th. 


204 O. A. 


A. E. 74 


Rec. 1 W. S., Lab. 2-5 F. S. 


204 O. A. 


A. E. 107 


As arranged 




A. H. Ill 


Lee. 9 M. T. Th. F, Lab. 7-9 M. T. 






Th. F. 


109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 112 


Lee. 1 M. T. Th. F, Lab. 10-12 M. 






T. Th. F. 


109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 113 


Lee. 2 M. T. Th. F, Lab. 3-5 M. T. 






Th. F. 


109 Ag. H. 


A H. 400 


Rec. 1, Lab. 2-5 M. W. 


117 Ag. H. 


A. H. 402 


Rec. 2 T. Th, Lab. 3-5 T. Th. 


117 Ag. H. 


\. H. 500, 510, 

515 
Bac. 4 


As arranged 




Lee. 7, Lab. 8-12 as arranged 


105 Sc. B. 


Bac. 31b, 75, 173, 

262 
Chem. 503 


As arranged 




Rec. 11, Lab. 8-10 M. W. F. 


286 C. B. 


Chem. 504 


Rec. 8M..T. W. F, Lab. 10-12 


286 C. B. 


C. E. 1109, 1110, 


As arranged 




1111. 1112 






Dairy 80. 81, 82, 


As arranged 




102, 143 






:on. 159, 160, 


As arranged 




350, 380 






20 


Rec. 2 


13 Cen. 


430a 


Rec. 3 


13 Cen. 


151 


Rec. 10, Lab. 7-l(\M. W. 


307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 152 


Rec. 2, Lab. 7-10 T. Th. 


307 Ag. H. 


181, 182, 


As arranged 




la-b-c, 282 






r. 76, 77 


As arranged 


Summer Camp 


Hort. 75a 


Lee. 8 M. W. F. S, Lab. 2-4 T. Th. 






S. 


208 Ag. H. 


Hort. 365 


Lee. 7 M. T. Th. F, Lab. 2-4 M. 






W. F. 


208 Ag. H. 



40 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS— continued 



Hort. 78, 178, 










278, 37 '8 


As arranged 








Psvch. 1 


•Rcc. 11, and 4 M. T. Th. 


F. 




210 Cen. 


Psych. 20 


Rec. 9, and 3 T. Th. 






210 Cen. 


Soils 151 


Rec. 7 M. W. F. S., Lai 
W. F. S. 


». 10-12 


M. 


7 Ag. H. 


Soils 251 


Rcc. 8 M. W. F. S., Lab. 
Th. F. 


1-3 M. 


W. 


7 Ag. H. 


Soils 252 


Rcc. 9 M. W. F. S., Lab. 
Th. F. 


3-5 M. 


W. 


7 Ag. H. 


Soils 281, 381, 










481, 571 


As arranged 








T. I. 1 


Lab. 8-11 M. T. Th. F. 






En. A. 


T. I. 2 


Lab. 1-4 M. T: Th. F. 






En. A. 


T. I. 14 


Rec. 1 






A. G. 


T. I. 18 


Lab. 8-11 






207 Trans. B. 


T. I. 20 


Rcc. 7 






A. G. 


T. I. 23 


Lab. 1-4 






A. E. Shop 


T. I. 26 


Lab. 8-11 






A. G. 


T. I. 27 


Lab. 1-4 






A. G. 


T. I. 142 


Rec. 11 






207 Trans. B. 


Voc. Ed. 52 


Rec. 7 






307 Ag. H. 


Yoc. Ed. 53 


Rcc. 10 






208 Ag. H. 


Voc. Ed. 57 


Rec. 8 






307 Ag. H. 


Zool. 380, 408 


As arranged 









NON-COLLEGIATE COURSES 



Course 



N101 

Nlll 



A. H. N222 
Bot. NIOOa 
Bot. XI 01 
Dairy N17 
Math. N31 



Hour of Recitation 



Lab. 8-10 M. W. F. S. 

Rcc. 7 M. T. Th. F., Lab. 2-4 M. T 

Th. F. 
As arranged 

Rcc. 8M.T.W.Th„ Lab. 3-5M.W. 
Lab. 8-12 and 1-3 S. , 
As arranged 
Rcc. 11 



R< 



Pav. 1 



IL 



117 Aj 
\g. H. 

Old FTort. Lab. 
Old Hort. Lab. 
D. B. 
C. B. 



tAHY OF THE 



hiN •' 






!S. 



THE FOOT-PATH TO PEACE 

To be glad of life because it gives you the 
chance to love and to work and to play and to 
look up at the stars; to be contented with 
your possessions, but not satisfied with your- 
self until you have made the best of them ; to 
despise nothing in the world except falsehood 
and meanness, and to fear nothing except 
cowardice; to be governed by your admira- 
tions rather than by your disgusts ; to covet 
nothing that is your neighbor's, except his 
kindness of heart and gentleness of manners ; 
to think seldom of your enemies, often of 
your friends, and every day of Christ ; and to 
spend as much time as you can, with body 
and with spirit, in God's out-of-doors — these 
are little guide-posts on the foot-path to 

peace. 

— Henry van Dyke 



ffltn»i<Hniininnnnnnn»iiHnniiiTHinii':iTT" 



•!•■••• •••#•••■ ••••«■ 

f 

• 

! 

I 
I 



.»..«..«.. 4-. ••■••••■■• ■••' 



••••••••••••■•••••••••••■•••' 



THE COLLEGE 

The Iowa State College of Agriculture and Me- 
chanic Arts conducts work in five major lines: 



Agriculture Engineering 

Home Economics Industrial Science 

Veterinary Medicine 

The Graduate College conducts advance research 
and instruction in all these five lines. 

Four-year, five-year, and six-year collegiate 
courses are offered in different divisions of the 
College. Non-collegiate courses are offered in 
agriculture, engineering, and home economics. 
Summer Sessions include graduate, collegiate, and 
non-collegiate work. Short courses are offered in 
the Winter. 

Extension courses are conducted at various 
points throughout the state. 

Research work is conducted in the Agricultural 
and Engineering Experiment Stations and in the 
Veterinary Research Laboratory. 

Special announcements of the different branches 
of the work are supplied, free of charge, on appli- 
cation. The general college catalogue will be sent 
on request. 

Address 

HERMAN KNAPP 

Ames, Iowa Registrar 



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Iowa State College 

of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts 

Official Publication 

VOL. XIX FEBRUARY 23, 1921 NO. 39 

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ENTH ANNUAL 



ELEVENTH 
SUMMER SESSION 
GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
1921 






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AMES, IOWA 
Published weekly by the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Me- 
chanic Arts, Ames, Iowa. Entered as second-class matter and accepted 
for mailing- at special rate of postage provided for in Section 429, P. L. & 
R., Act August 24, 1912, authorized April 12, 1920 




BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF CAMPUS 

1921 SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR 

June 10-11, Friday and Saturday — Registration and Classification. 

June 13, Monday, 8:00 a. m. — Work begins on regular schedule. 

June 15, Wednesday, 10:20 a. m. — First Summer Session Convocation, 
Agricultural Hall. 

June 22, 23, 24, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday — Examination for 
county uniform certificates. Room 317, Agricultural Hall. 

July 11-15 — Conference on Vocational Agriculture. 

July 20, Wednesday, 4:00 p. m. — Close of first half of Summer Session. 



July 19, 20, Tuesday and Wednesday — Registration and Classification. 

July 21, Thursday, 7:00 a. m. — Beginning of second half of Summer 
Session. 

July 27, 28, 29, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday — Examination for 
county uniform certificates. Room 317, Agricultural Hall. 

August 26, Friday, 4:00 p. m. — Close of Summer Session. 



1922 Summer Session 

First Half, June 12-July 19. 

Second Half, July 20-August 25. 
(Subjecl to Change) 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The college always has recognized its special responsibility in the 
training of high school and college teachers of agriculture, manual 
training, home economics, and the application of science to these vo- 
cational subjects. 

Teachers in service can be helped best through the Summer Session, 
and in a large measure they have a right to the advantages of the 
unusual equipment of the Iowa State College. This is especially true 
since the legislation requiring the teaching of the industrial subjects 
in the public schools. In the forthcoming Summer Session the excel- 
lent facilities of the college, as usual, will be available to the fullest 
extent to those who wish to enroll as students. 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

The establishment of vocational education on a large scale through 
the Smith-Hughes bill places an additional responsibility upon the 
Iowa State College, and this responsibility it will endeavor to meet 
fully. 

The Iowa State College has been authorized as the one institution 
of the state to train teachers of vocational agriculture, and federal 
funds are made available under the Smith-Hughes Vocational Educa- 
tional Law for the support of such training. 

The Iowa State College has also been approved by the State and 
Federal Vocational Boards for the training of teachers of Home Eco- 
nomics and Trades and Industry. 

This means that the Iowa State College has new obligations for the 
training of teachers under the Smith-Hughes Law in addition to former 
obligations imposed by the Nelson Amendment to the Morrill Act. 

Who May Attend. The rapid extension of vocational subjects in 
the public schools is a direct result of the demands of democracy for 
a type of education which functions in daily life. The vocational work 
in the public schools has increased to such an extent that at the pres- 
ent time all people engaged in school work are of necessity interested 
in the vocational and industrial subjects. The superintendent needs 
an acquaintance with such subjects in order to properly emphasize 
them in the curriculum. The high school principal needs especially 
to be familiar with such subjects in order properly to advise students 
and in order to have the proper basis for vocational guidance and 
direction. The teachers of the vocational subjects are of course in- 
terested. Teachers of subjects that are not vocational, however, are 
showing more and more interest in such subjects because they realize 
the desirability of proper correlation of studies, and the opportunities 
for motivating the older type of school work through articulation with 
the industrial and vocational work. The program of industrial and 
vocational work together with the related science and education that 
is now being offered at Iowa State College is large enough, therefore, 
to appeal to any progressive school man or woman. 

Conditions of Admission. All students who can profit by the in- 
struction offered will be admitted without examination, admission to 
a particular course being satisfactory to the professor in charge. It 
is presumed that all applying for admission have a serious purpose, 



and are interested in the industrial work. College credit will be 
granted, however, only to those who meet standard entrance require- 
ments. All entering the college for the first time should send creden- 
tials to the registrar covering entrance requirements or advanced 
standing, in order that at the close of the summer term grades carry- 
ing college credit may be sent out in regular form. 

Studies and Credits. Nearly two hundred college credit studies are 
offered. An average student should be able to make nine hours credit 
during a single half of the Summer Session. All courses offered are 
completed during a single half of the Summer Session by increasing 
the number of recitations per week. There are no split courses. 

Late Entrance. Because of the rapidity with which the work moves 
in a short session, students should enter in time to attend the first 
session of all classes. Work begins at 8:00 a. m. on Monday, June 13. 
Most courses have laboratory periods, and students should therefore 
plan to be present for the first meeting of the class. 

Special Work. Students wishing to do advanced or other special 
work not announced in this bulletin should communicate at an early 
date with the Director of the Summer Session, or with the professor 
in whose department they wish to work. Consideration may be given 
to a sufficient number of requests. For statement on graduate work 
see page 30. 

Fees. The single Summer Session fee of $5.00 for each half of the 
session, covers work in all courses with the exception of the Music 
Department. The fee for less than the full time is $1.00 a week, with 
$2.00 as a minimum; or $1.00 per credit hour for college credit work, 
with $2.00 as a minimum. Laboratory fees are indicated in connection 
with the descriptions of the courses. 

Room and Board. Room and board is available in private homes and 
at the college dormitories at prices which are customary throughout 
Iowa. The cafe in Alumni Hall will be open during the entire Sum- 
mer Session, and will be managed on the cafeteria plan. 

Women will arrange for rooms through the regular college committee 
of which the Adviser of Women is chairman. The college dormitories 
will be open for women students for board and room and all women 
students will be assigned to dormitories. In the dormitories and pri- 
vate homes alike, mattresses only are furnished for the cots, so that 
students should bring a pillow, sheets, pillow cases and an extra 
blanket. 

Rooms for men will be available in private homes and rooming houses 
about the campus. Rooming arrangements for men will be in charge 
of the Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

Expenses. Expenses will vary with the individual. For each half 
the expenses need not exceed $75 or $80 in addition to car fare. This 
makes provision for tuition, room and board for six weeks, books and 
laundry, and other incidentals. 

Certificates. The State Board of Educational Examiners will grant 
five-year, first-grade certificates to graduates of the Iowa State Col- 
lege, or other approved colleges, who have completed (a) nine quarter- 
hours of psychology, and (b) twenty-one hours of education. The 
courses offered in the Summer Session enable students to meet these 
requirements. # 

Teachers' Examination. The State Teachers' examination for June 
and July will be held at the college during the Summer Session for the 
convenience of the teachers in attendance. One expecting to take an 
examination at the college should bring with him a statement from 
the county superintendent, together with county superintendent's re- 
ceipt showing payment of fee, which will admit to the examination. 



i 



Where such fee has not been previously paid it will be collected and 
forwarded to the county superintendent. 

The Appointment Committee. In order to better serve the schools 
of the state, the faculty has provided a regular Appointment Commit- 
tee, the duties of which are to assist the students of the college who 
desire to enter educational work, in finding positions for which they 
are best fitted, and to aid school officials in finding the teachers, prin- 
cipals, supervisors and superintendents best prepared for the positions 
to be filled. Students of the Summer Session, who intend to teach or 
wish to better their positions, may register with this committee. 
Blanks which are provided for that purpose may be secured by calling 




CENTRAL CAMPUS 



at the office of the Director of the Summer Session, Room 318, Agri- 
cultural Hall. No fee is charged for the services of this committee. 

Chapel. Chapel services are held at 10:20 a. m., Wednesday of each 
week and all students are expected to attend. This is more or less 
in the nature of a convocation as well as a chapel service, and fur- 
nishes opportunity for announcements or for brief remarks upon sub- 
jects of immediate interest. 

Each Sunday evening, vesper services are held from 6:15 to 6:45 at 
the campanile when the weather is favorable. In case of inclement 
weather, the meeting is held in Agricultural Assembly. 

Summer Employment. Students coming for the short Summer Ses- 
sion are not advised to seek employment, but to give their full time to 
school work. 

There are usually some summer calls for help. Students may learn 
of these calls through the Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 

Recreation. While the primary object of the Summer Session is 
work and study, yet these will be facilitated by a sufficient amount of 
recreation. Students are urged to effect organizations and to arrange 



for tournaments in tennis, baseball, track, or indoor work. The Com- 
mittee on Games and Recreation will encourage and help in organiz- 
ing the details of this work. The swimming pool in the Men's Gym- 
nasium will be open daily for men from 4:00 to 6:00 p. m. 

Special Features. One feature of the Summer Session which is par- 
ticularly worth while is the opportunity to hear educators of national 
reputation. The policy of selecting a limited number of men whose 
addresses no one can afford to miss will be continued this year. These 
lectures for the most part are scheduled for the evening; occasionally, 
however, at 5:00 o'clock. 

Since the National Education Association meets in Des Moines dur- 
ing the present summer, there will be an opportunity of securing edu- 
cators of national fame on a more extended scale than usual. It is 
planned to put on a little N. E. A. at Ames for the benefit of the Sum- 
mer Session students. 

Library. The library of the Iowa State College is well selected and 
it is so managed as to make it serviceable to all students during the 
Summer Session. 

Equipment. The equipment of the Iowa State College for work in 
agriculture, home economics, trades and industry, manual training, 
and related subjects is in keeping with the wealth and resources of 
the state. In many respects, the Summer Session is the best season 
of the year for studying agriculture, and the regular college instructors 
in charge of the work use freely the resources of the college and the 
experiment station. 

Location. Ames is almost at the geographical center of the state 
of Iowa, on the main line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad. It 
is about thirty-five miles north of Des Moines, with which it is con- 
nected by a branch line of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad and 
by the Fort Dodge, Des Moines and Southern (interurban) running 
from Fort Dodge and Rockwell City to Des Moines. A branch of the 
Chicago & Northwestern from Ames penetrates the northern part of 
the state. Ames is proverbially a clean town. 

Students should plan to arrive on Saturday. In case it is absolutely 
necessary to arrive on Sunday, advanced notice should be given, with 
the request that rooms be arranged for, at least temporarily. 

CONFERENCES 

Rural Life Conference. The Rural Life Conference is now held at 
the time of the Mid-winter Short course instead of during the Sum- 
mer Session. 

Conference of Teachers of Agriculture. Professor W. H. Bender, 
State Director of Vocational Education, has fixed the week of July 11 
to 15 as the date for the Conference of Teachers of Vocational Agri- 
culture. In addition to special work by Professor Bender and his as- 
sistant, Professor Louis Wermelskirchen, specialists in various lines 
from the college, as well as outside men, will participate in the con- 
ference. This conference should be of interest, not only to present 
and prospective teachers of vocational agriculture, but also to present 
teachers of general agriculture and to principals and superintendents 
who desire to get in a short space of time a reasonably adequate no- 
tion of the plans for vocational work in agriculture. 



OFFICERS AND FACULTY 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

D. D. Murphy, President, Elkader. 
W. C. Stuckslager, Lisbon. 

Geo. T. Baker, Davenport. 

Paul E. Stillman, Jefferson. 

Frank F. Jones, Villisca. 

P. K. Holbrook, Onawa. 

Chas. R. Brenton, Dallas Center. 

Edw. P. Schoentgen, Council Bluffs. 

Anna B. Lawther, Dubuque. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

W. R. Boyd, Chairman, Cedar Rapids. 

Thomas Lambert, Sabula. 

W. H. Gemmill, Secretary, Des Moines. 

AUDITOR AND SECRETARY SCHOOL RELATIONS COMMITTEE 

Jackson W. Bowdish, Auditor and Accountant, Des Moines. 

John E. Foster, Secretary School Relations Committee, Des Moines. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

Raymond A. Pearson, President. 

Herman Knapp, Business Manager, Central Building. 

G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session, Agricultural Hall. 

J. R. Sage, Acting Registrar, Central Building. 

SUMMER SESSION COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, President. 

C. F. Curtiss, Dean of Agriculture. 

Anson Marston, Dean of Engineering. 

R. E. Buchanan, Dean of Graduate College. 

Catherine J. MacKay, Dean of Home Economics. 

S. W. Beyer, Dean of Industrial Science. 

G. M. Wilson, Director of Summer Session. 

PROFESSORS 

E. M. Baldwin Zoology 

E. D. Ball Zoology 

F. W. Beckman Agricultural Journalism 
H. A. Bittenbender Poultry Husbandry 

F. E. Brown Chemistry 

P. E. Brown Soils 

R. E. Buchanan Bacteriology 

Florence E. Busse Home Economics 

O. H. Cessna Psychology 

J. C. Cunningham Horticulture 

J. B. Davidson Agricultural Engineering 

J. M. Evvard Animal Husbandry 

B. W. Hammer Dairying 

Joanna M. Hansen Home Economics 



F. M. Harrington 
H. H. Kildee 

W. F. LaGrange 

G. B. MacDonald 
J. N. Martin 

C. W. Mayser 
I. E. Melhus 
M. Mortensen 
H. S. Murphey 
A. B. Noble 
E. G. Nourse 
L. H. Pammel 
Maria M. Roberts 
Frederica Shattuck 
P. S. Shearer 
W. H. Stevenson 
G. H. Von Tungeln 
J. A. Wilkinson 
G. M. Wilson 



Horticulture 

Animal Husbandry 

Animal Husbandry 

Forestry 

Botany 

Physical Training 

Botany 

Dairying 

Veterinary Anatomy 

English 

Economic Science 

Botany 

Mathematics 

Public Speaking 

Animal Husbandry 

Soils 

Economic Science 

Chemistry 

Vocational Education 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 



N. Beth Bailey 

A. L. Bakke 

J. H. Buchanan 

A. B. Caine 

Julia Colpitts 

Louis De Vries 

E. E. Eastman 

R. C. Engberg 

Fred C. Fenton 

Myrtle Ferguson 

Ruth Freegard 

E. I. Fulmer 

E. F. Goss 

W. L. Harter 

M. D. Helser 

C. A. Iverson 

H. W. Johnson 

M. A. Kent 

Lillis Knappenberger 

William Kunerth 

W. H. Lancelot 

J. V. Lynn 

A. C. McCandlish 

Clyde McKee 

J. V. McKelvey 

Tolbert MacRae 

N. A. Merriam 

E. M. Mervine 
Cora B. Miller 
G. C. Morbeck 
Eda L. Murphy 
V. E. Nelson 

R. A. Norman 

F. B. Paddock 
N. C. Paine 

E3. A. Pattengill 
H.J. Plagge 

G. W. Snedecor 
It. S. Stephenson 
H. Stiles 



Home Economics 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Animal Husbandry 

Mathematics 

Modern Languages 

Soils 

Farm Management 

Agricultural Engineering 

Home Economics 

Home Economics 

Chemistry 

Dairying 

Farm Management 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Soils 

Physical Training 

Home Economics 

Physics 

Vocational Education 

Trades and Industries 

Animal Husbandry 

Farm Crops 

Mathematics 

Music 

Physical Training 

Agricultural Engineering 

Vocational Education 

Forestry 

Home Economics 

Chemistry 

Physical Training 

Zoology 

Physical Training 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Mathematics 

Animal Husbandry 

Physics 



T. F. Vance 
R. M. Vifquain 

Earl Weaver 



A. L. Anderson 
R. S. Bottorff 

I. T. Bode 
Blair Converse 
Rosamond C. Cook 
C. S. Dorchester 
J. M. Early 
Paul Emerson 
E. T. Erickson 

B. J. Firkins 

E. S. Haber 
H. M. Hamlin 
Gertrude Herr 
John Hug 
Belle Lowe 

R. L. McFarland 
A. B. Moore 
H. OtoPalik 
I. F. Parker 
L. L. Stewart 

F. N. Summers 
Anna H. Tappan 
A. W. Turner 
H. V. Wright 



L. P. Arduser 

S. J. Borucki 

Earl N. Bressman 

Karl Brown 

J. A. Burrows 

J. J. Canfield 

Florence A. Catlin 

O. W. Chapman 

Clarissa May Clark 

W. T. Elder 

Fay Farnum 

W. P. Fishel 

Wm. H. Flood 

Marion B. Gardner 

V. G. Heller 

H. F. Hertz 

H. A. Hill 

Mrs. J. F. Kirkman 

Nelle Knappenberger 

Helen I. Larson 

Agnes Murphy 

A. F. Nickels 

Grace Ogg 

H. Z. Rynerson 

Mildred Semmons 

E. M. Spangler 

L. B. Storms 



Lois Baker 



Psychology 
Farm Crops 
Animal Husbandry 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Animal Husbandry 

Animal Husbandry 

Forestry 

Agricultural Journalism 

Home Economics 

Farm Crops 

Trades and Industries 

Soils 

Farm Crops 

Soils 

Horticulture 

Vocational Education 

Mathematics 

Mechanical Engineering 

Home Economics 

Mechanical Engineering 

History 

Physical Training 

Horticulture 

Animal Husbandry 

Animal Husbandry 

Mathematics 

Agricultural Engineering 

Chemistry 

INSTRUCTORS 

Trades and Industries 

Public Speaking 

Farm Crops 

English 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 

Mathematics 

Chemistry 

Bacteriology 

Trades and Industries 

Mathematics 

Chemistry 

Trades and Industries 

Home Economics 

Chemistry 

Agricultural Engineering 

Chemistry 

English 

Home Economics 

English 

Physical Education 

Mechanical Engineering 

Home Economics 

Agricultural Engineering 

English 

Mechanical Engineering 

Chemistry 

ASSISTANT 

Physical Education 



SPECIALS 



R. K. Bliss 
H. L. Eells 
Neale S. Knowles 



J. A. Starkweather 

(Published faculty list is tentative.) 



Director Agricultural Extension 

Vocational Education 

State Leader Home Demonstration 

Agents 
Vocational Education 




LIVING ROOM AT HOME ECONOMICS PRACTICE HOUSE 






10 



COLLEGE CREDIT COURSES 

The courses described below are the same as those offered during 
the college year and will be taught by the regular college faculty. 
The descriptions are quoted from the regular college catalog. 

Other courses may be offered when requested by a sufficient num- 
ber of students. Students who have become irregular due to military 
service, food production, manufacture of munitions, or other causes 
incident to the war will be given every opportunity possible to make 
up their work during the Summer Session. 

As the Summer Session is approximately one-half the length of a 
college quarter, the number of hours per week devoted to a course in 
the Summer Session will be two times what is shown in the descrip- 
tions below. The schedule of recitations at the close of the catalog 
shows the actual number of recitations and laboratories per week 
during the Summer Session. 

Nine hours per week constitute full work in the college courses. 
There is little doubt but that the numbers wanting each course will 
justify offering it. 

The regular amount of work for a single Summer Session will en- 
able one to secure eighteen hours of agriculture and this will meet 
requirements in some schools. Any combination of animal husbandry, 
agricultural engineering, dairy, farm crops, farm management, poultry, 
horticulture, or soils, is acceptable and all of this is the right type of 
agricultural work for the prospective high school teacher. The rea- 
sonably small units of specialized work are considered much more de- 
sirable than courses in general agriculture. The schedule is so ar- 
ranged as to avoid conflict and enable the student to carry the full 
amount of agriculture during the first and second halves of the sum- 
mer school. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

51. Forge Shop. Forging and welding iron and steel. Making, hard- 
ening and tempering small tools. Work designed to be helpful in re- 
pair of farm equipment. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 2. Fee $3.00. 

52. Carpentry. Use, care and sharpening of tools. Joining, fram- 
ing and rafter cutting. Helpful in farm building, planning and con- 
struction. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 2. Fee $3.00. 

54. Practical Farm Mechanics. Plan and equipment of a farm shop. 
Use of farm shop tools in the repair and maintenance of farm equip- 
ment. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 2. Fee $3.00. 

55. Advanced Forge Work. The repair and care of agricultural 
equipment including plow share work, autogenic welding, forging of 
special farm equipment and tools. For prospective teachers. 

Prerequisite 51; labs. 2, 3 hr.; Credit 2. Fee $3.00. 

60. Farm Machinery and Farm Motors. Mechanics and materials; 
study of the construction, adjustment, operation and testing of farm 
machinery and farm motors; measurement and transmission of power. 

Prerequisite, Physics 101. Rec. 3, lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $2.00. 

ll 



61. Gas Engines and Tractors. The construction, operation, adjust- 
ment, and care of gasoline and oil engines and tractors. 
Prerequisite 60. Rec. 1; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 3. Fee $2.50. 

74. Concrete and Masonry. Materials, specifications and tests; 
study of mixtures, forms, reinforcement; concrete on the farm. Other 
fireproof building materials. 

Lecture 1; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 2. Fee $2.00. 

77. Farm Sanitary Equipment. Lighting, heating, ventilation, water 
supply, plumbing, sewage disposal. 

Rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 3. Fee $1.50. 

79. Farm Buildings and Equipment. Plans, materials, construction, 
lighting, heating and ventilation of farm buildings; water supply, sew- 
age disposal. 

Prerequisite 80. Rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 3. Fee $1.00. 

80. Graphic Methods. Plotting and charting agricultural statistics, 
analysis of data, etc. 

Lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 1. 

106a. Farm Machinery. Research. Hours and amount of credit as 
arranged. 

106b. Farm Power. Research. Hours and amount of credit as ar- 
ranged. 

107. Farm Structures. Research. Hours and amount of credit as 
arranged. 

AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISM 

28a. Beginning Technical Journalism. News values, news style, 
news gathering and writing and the applications to agricultural, en- 
gineering, home economics subject-matter. 

Prerequisites, English 40c, 140c, or 240c. Rec. 3. Credit 3. 

29a. Feature Writing for Technical Journals. Writing of the longer 
feature and magazine articles dealing with agriculture, engineering or 
home economics. 

Rec. 3. Credit 3. 

33. Agricultural Publicity. (For prospective agricultural teachers, 
county agents, or extension workers.) 

Prerequisite 28a. Rec. 2. Credit 2. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

A. H. 101. Types and Market Classes of Beef and Dual Purpose 
Cattle. Judging; types, carcasses, markets, market classifications. 

Rec. and labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 2. Fee $1.00. 

A. H. 102. Types and Market Classes of Sheep and Horses. Similar 
to 101. 

Rec. and labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 2. Fee $1.00. 

A. H. 103. Types and Market Classes of Dairy Cattle and Hogs. 
Similar to 101. 

Rec. and labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 2. Fee $1.00. 

A. H. 111. Breeds of Beef and Dual-Purpose Cattle. Judging; 
origin, history, type, and adaptability. 

Prerequisite 101. Lecture 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 3 1 /-?. Fee $1.00. 

A. H. 112. Breeds of Sheep and Horses. Similar to 111. 

Prerequisite 102. Lectures 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 3V 3 . Fee $1.00. 

A. H. 113. Breeds of Dairy Cattle and Hogs. Similar to 111. 

Prerequisite 103. Lectures 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 3%. Fee $1.00. 

A. H. 218. Animal Nutrition. Fundamental basis of nutrition; prac- 
tical methods. Nutritive ratios and feeding standards. 

12 



Prerequisite Chem. 752; prerequisite or classification in Vet. Phys. 
611. Lectures 3. Credit 3. 

A. H. 224. Feeding and Management of Beef Cattle and Sheep. 
(For Seniors.) Similar to 222. 

Prerequisite 222. Lectures 2; lab. 1, 2 hr. Credit 2%. Fee $2.00. 

A. H. 240. Animal Feeding. (For Agronomy students.) Composi- 
tion and digestibility of feeding stuffs; preparation; feeding standards 
and calculation of rations. 

Prerequisite Chem. 751. Lectures 5. Credit 5. 

A. H. 300. Advanced Study of the Dairy Breeds. Origin, history, 
and characteristics of important strains and families. 

Prerequisite 113, and Vet. Anat. 610. Rec. 3; lecture and labs. 2, 
2 hr. Credit 4}£. Fee $1.00. 

A. H. 310. Dairy Herd Practice. Efficient economic production of 
milk; care, feeding, housing and management of dairy cattle. 

Prerequisite 223. Rec. 5. Credit 5. 

A. H. 400. General Poultry Husbandry. Commercial production; 
judging, breeding, housing, diseases, sanitation, marketing. 

Rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $2.00. 

A. H. 402. General Poultry Husbandry. Continuation of 400. Feed- 
ing, incubation and breeding. 

Rec. 1; lab. 1, 2 hr.. Credit 1%. Fee $2.00. 

434. Special Poultry Problems. Experimentation, technique, prac- 
tice. 

Prerequisite 402. Labs. 3, 3 hr. Credit 3. Fee $2.00. 

500. Advanced Animal Production and Nutrition. Feeding and 
management of live stock. Practical experimental methods; research 
work. 

Credit 3 to 10. 

505. Research in Animal Breeding. Special problems in heredity 
and breeding. 

Credit 3 to 10. 

A. H. 510. Research in Dairy Husbandry. Dairy breeds; milk pro- 
duction and herd management. 

Credit 3 to 10. 

515. Research in Poultry Husbandry. Incubation, brooding, feed- 
ing, breeding, marketing. Principles and practices of management of 
flocks. 

Credit 3 to 10. 

BACTERIOLOGY AND HYGIENE. 

3. General Bacteriology. Morphology, classification, physiology and 
cultivation of bacteria; relation of bacteria to health of man, animals 
and plants. 

Prerequisite Organic Chemistry. Fee $5.00. 

A. (Students in Animal Husbandry.) 
Lectures 3; labs. 6 hrs. Credit 5. 

B. Primarily for students in Agriculture, Farm Crops and Soils, 
and Farm Management, emphasizing the agricultural applications of 
bacteriology. 

Lectures 3; labs. 6 hrs. Credit 5. 

C. Primarily for students in Dairying, Industrial Science and In- 
dustrial Chemistry. 

Lectures 3; labs. 6 to 9 hrs. Credit 5 to 6. 

4. Household Bacteriology. Bacteria in their relation to the prob- 
lems of the home and community. 

Lectures 3; labs. 6 hrs. Credit 5. Fee $5.00. 

13 



31. Research in General or Systematic Bacteriology. 

A. For undergraduates. Credit 2 to 5. Fee $5.00. 

B. For graduates. Credit 1 to 10. Fee $5.00. 

75. Research in Pathogenic Bacteriology. (For graduate students.) 
Prerequisites 3 and 64 or equivalent. Fee $5.00. 
173. Research in Sanitary Bacteriology and Hygiene. (For gradu- 
ate students.) 

Prerequisite 3 and 156 or equivalent. 

262. Research in Household Bacteriology. (For graduate students.) 

BOTANY 

135. Elementary Plant Morphology. (Agricultural students.) Seed 
plants, their structure and function; study of the various groups of 
simpler plants. 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit 2%. Fee $2.00. 

148aC. (For research students.) Special problems in morphology. 

Rec. and labs, as arranged. Credit 5. Fee $3.00. 

320. General Plant Pathology. Discussion of the nature, cause and 
control of diseases of field, orchard and forest crops. 

Prerequisite 200. Rec. 2; labs. 3, 3 hr. or 3, 2 hr. Credit 5 or 4. 
Fee $4.00. 

325. Advanced Plant Pathology. Cultural, physiological, histological 
and cytological technique. Laboratory practice in isolation of para- 
sites, germination, inoculation, and carrying stock cultures. 

Prerequisite 320. Rec. 2; labs. 3, 3 hr. Credit 5. Fee $5.00. 

326. Plant Pathology. Specific problems in the diseases of plants. 
Prerequisites 200 and 325, as arranged. Credit 2 to 10. Fee $3.00 

to $5.00. 

415a, 415b. Systematic Botany. Flowering plants or thallophytes. 
Historical survey of various systems of classification; groups by means 
of representatives. 

A. Systematic Spermatophytes. 

Prerequisite 129 or 135. Rec. 2; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $3.00. 

B. Advanced Conference in Systematic Botany. Special groups 
of spermatophytes. 

Rec. 2; labs. 3, 3 hr. Credit 5. Fee $3.00. 

416. Research in Systematic Botany. 
A. (For agricultural students.) Plants of economic importance 
and those related to agricultural and horticultural problems. 

Prerequisites Botany 144 or 200, 415, Zool. 1, or Bact. 3. Rec. and 
labs, as arranged. Credit 5. Fee $3.00. 

B. (For forestry students.) Botany of national and state parks and 
forest reserves. 

Field work, as arranged. Credit 3. Fee $3.00. 

481a. Research in Seed Testing. Structure, impurities and adulter- 
ation of seeds. 

Prerequisites 415 and 490. Lectures and labs, as arranged. Credit 
5. Fee $3.00. 

604b. Thesis. (For graduates.) 

Credit 5. Fee $5.00. 

609. Research. Advanced courses are offered in (a) Plant Mor- 
phology, (b) Plant Physiology, (c) Plant Pathology, (d) General Bot- 
any and Taxonomy. 

CHEMISTRY 

502. Principles and the Non-Metallic Elements. 
A. (For students who have not had high school chemistry.) 
Lee. 2; rec. 1; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Deposit $7.50. 

14 



B. (For students who have had high school chemistry.) 
Lee. 2; rec. 1; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Deposit $7.50. 

C. (For students desiring a more extended study.) 
Lee. 2; rec. 1; labs, 2, 3 hr/ Credit 5. Deposit $10.00. 

503. General Chemistry. Metallic elements. 

A. (For students who have not had high school chemistry.) 
Lee. 2; rec. 1; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Deposit $7.50. 

B. (For students who have had high school chemistry.) 
Prerequisite 502. Lee. 2; rec. 1; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Deposit 

$7.50. 

C. (For students desiring a more extended study.) 
Prerequisite 502. Lee. 2; rec. 1; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 5. Deposit 

$10.00 

504. Qualitative Analysis. Tests for and separation of the common 
metallic and non-metallic ions. 

Prerequisite 503. Lee. 1; rec. 1; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 4. Deposit 
$10.00. 

C. (For students desiring a more extended study.) 
Rec. 2; labs. 3, 3 hr. Credit 5. Deposit $12.50. 
521a, 521b, 521c. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Atomic 
structure, periodic law, valency, ionization, etc. 

A. Prerequisite 515b or 605b. Lectures 3. Credit 3. 

B. Lectures 3. Credit 3. 

C. Lectures 3. Credit 3. 

509a, 509b. General Chemistry. (Home Economics students.) Prin- 
ciples and the non-metallic elements. 

(509a) Lee. 2; rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 5. Deposit $7.50. 

(509b) Metallic elements and their compounds. 

Lee. 2; rec. 1; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Deposit $7.50. 

563a, 563b, 563c. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Theory, meth- 
ods and difficult separations. 

Prerequisite 561b. Recitation or conference 1; labs. 2 to 6, 3 hr. 
Credit 3 to 7. Deposit $12.50 for each course. 

751a, 751b. Applied Organic Chemistry. Properties, classification, 
and methods of preparation of organic compounds. Special emphasis 
upon agricultural applications of the subject. 

Prerequisite 504. Lee. 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit ZV 3 . Deposit $10.00. 

752. Agricultural Analysis and Bio-Chemistry. Gravimetric and 
volumetric analysis; analysis of agricultural products; lectures on bio- 
chemistry and the elements of nutrition. 

Prerequisite 751b. Lee. 2; labs. 2, 2 hr. Credit SV 3 . Deposit $10.00. 

765. Analysis of Soils and Fertilizers. An advanced course taking 
up detailed and complete methods. 

Prerequisites 514, 561c, 606b, 651c. Lectures 1; labs. 3, 3 hr. Credit 
4. Deposit $12.50. 

775. Applied Organic Chemistry. (Home Economics students.) 
Fundamental principles of organic chemistry. Special attention to 
compounds of household importance. 

Prerequisite 509b. Lee. 3; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 5. Deposit $12.50. 

776. Food Chemistry. Elementary quantitative analysis; study of 
common food and household products, their composition and methods 
of analysis. 

Prerequisite 775. Lee. 3; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 5. Deposit $12.50. 

802. Physiological Chemistry and Nutrition. Chemical composition 
of living matter; digestion; fundamentals of nutrition. 

Prerequisite 752 or 776. Lee. 3; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 3 to 5. De- 
posit $12.50. 

803. Advanced Physiological Chemistry and Nutrition. Chemistry 

15 



of tissues, urine, feces; metabolism; specific effects of faulty nutri- 
tion. 

Prerequisite 802. Lee. 3; labs. 2, 3 hr. Credit 3 or 5. Deposit $12.50. 

841. Special Problems. Physiological Chemistry applied to dietetics, 
veterinary medicine, animal nutrition, bacteriology, etc. 

Prerequisite 805c. Conference 1; labs. 2, 3 hr. or more. Credit 3 
or more. Deposit $12.50. 

901. Research. (Graduate students.) Credits as arranged. 

A. Inorganic Chemistry. 

B. Analytical Chemistry. 




DAIRY BARNS 

C. Physical Chemistry. 

D. Organic Chemistry. 

E. Organic Analysis and Food Analysis. 

F. Agricultural Chemistry. 

G. Physiological' Chemistry and Nutrition. 
H. Textile Chemistry. 

Advanced courses as well as research work for teachers and gradu- 
ate students will be offered as usual, in inorganic, analytical, physical, 
organic, agricultural, bio-chemistry, textile and physiological chemistry 
and nutrition. 

DAIRYING 

15. Farm Dairying. Secretion, composition, testing and separa- 
tion of milk for butter fat, total solids and acidity; use of separators 
and care of cream; the farm manufacture of butter, ice cream, and 
cheese. 

Lee. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $2.00. 

65. Domestic Dairying. Selection, care and use of milk and its 
products; practice in the manufacture of various dairy products. 

/'^requisite Chem. 775. Rec. 2; lab. 1, 2 hr. Credit 2%. 

80. Research in Manufacture of Butter. 

81. Research In Manufacture of Ice Cream. 

82. Research in Management of Dairy Plants. 



1G 



143. (Bact. 143.) Research in Dairy Bacteriology. (For graduate 
students.) 

Prerequisite 102. 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE 

50. Elementary Economics. (For students in Home Economics.) 
Rec. 3. Credit 3. 

135. Problems in Advanced Agricultural Economics. Lectures, as- 
signed readings, and class reports on selected problems. 
Credit 2. 

159. Research. Individual investigation of selected problems. 
By arrangement. Credit 1 to 6. 

160. Thesis. Research work and preparation of thesis, which may 
be credited as partial requirements for advanced degrees. 

315. Rural Sociology and Community Organization. 

A study of the fundamental forces and factors which shape present 
day rural life, together with the outlining of plans and programs for 
the organization of rural communities and community development. 

Rec. 3. Credit 3. 

340. Research. Special problems in the field of rural sociology. 
Conference course, senior year. 

Credit 1 to 6. 

350. Social Surveys in Absentia. Surveys of school districts and 
church parishes. Credited as partial requirements for an advanced 
degree. 

Credit 4 to 10. 

380. Thesis. On special subjects in the field of rural sociology. A 
partial requirement for an advanced degree in graduate work in rural 
sociology. 

ENGLISH 

19. Introductory College Course. Structure of the sentence and of 
the paragraph. Daily paragraph themes. The purpose is to teach the 
student correctness, force, and ease in sentence structure and orderli- 
ness in the arrangement of thought. 

Rec. 3. Credit 3. Will be accepted as substitute for 40a, 140a, or 
240a. 

20. Exposition. Principles and methods of expository writing; log- 
ical basis in definition and division; different types of exposition, with 
study of models; careful attention to the construction of paragraphs 
and the making of plans and outlines; a short theme almost daily, 
with longer ones occasionally; constant emphasis on the application of 
the principles studied. 

Rec. 3. Credit 3. Will be accepted as substitute for 40b, 140b or 
240b. 

21. Narration and Description. Expository and suggestive descrip- 
tion; better vocabulary through search for the specific word; simple 
and complex narrative, with incidental description; plot and character- 
ization; securing interest, as well as clearness and good order; analy- 
sis of good models. Themes almost daily, to train the student to apply 
the principles studied. 

Rec. 3. Credit 3. Will be accepted as substitute for 40c, 140c, or 240c. 

251a. Masterpieces, English. Shakespeare to Wordsworth; the 
Victorian period, with special attention to one essayist, one poet and 
one novelist. 

Prerequisite 240c. Rec. 3. Credit 3. 

430a. The American Short-Story. 

Rec. 3. Credit 3. 

17 



143 and 441. Argumentation. Inductive and deductive argument; 
fallacies; analyzing, abstracting, and classifying arguments on some 
question of present importance; briefing; writing forensic. 

Prerequisite 40c, 140c, or 240c. Eng. 143. Rec. 2. Credit 2. Eng. 
441. Rec. 3. Credit 3. 

FARM CROPS 

151. Corn Production. Adaptation, importance, cultural methods, 
harvesting, marketing, uses, care of seed corn. Plant study, judging 
of single and ten ear samples. 

Rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $1.50. 




FARM MACHINERY LABORATORY 



152. Small Grain Production. Oats, wheat, barley, rye. Character- 
istics, adaptation, seed selection, cultural methods, harvesting, storing, 
uses. Identification of grains. Judging for seed and market. 

Rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $1.50. 



Advanced Corn Production. Origin, characteristics and adapta- 



tion of leading varieties — corn and small grains. Judging grains for 
oppf] slid mfirkpt 

Prerequisites 151 and 152. Rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 3. Fee $2.00. 

154. Forage Crop Production. Grasses, legumes and other crops 
suitable for forage. Adaptation, cultural methods, uses. Identification 
of plants, seeds and common adulterants. 

Prerequisites 151 and 152. Rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $2.00. 

160. Summer Course. Study of farm crops in the field under in- 
vestigational conditions. Prerequisites 151 and 152. 
Labs. 3 weeks. Credit 5. Fee $5.00. 

181. Research in Crop Production. Problems of growth, harvesting 
and storage of cereal crops. 

Prerequisites 151, 152, 154. Credit 1 to 10 hrs. 

182. Conferences in Crop Production. Reports and discussion on 
current investigation. 

281a, 281b, 281c. Research in Crop Breeding. I. Cereal breeding 

18 



II. Forage crop breeding. III. Methods of investigation. Special 
problems with the Iowa Experiment Station. 

Prerequisite Farm Crops 251. 

282. Conferences in Crop Breeding. Reports and discussions on 
current investigations. 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

21. Farm Accounts. Farm inventories, stock and crop accounts, 
complete cost accounts, and farm records. Special emphasis on in- 
terpretation of accounts. 

Rec. 1; lab. 2, 2 hr. Credit 2y 3 . Fee $1.00. 

22. Farm Management. Factors controlling the success of farming 
as found in farm surveys; types; farm layout; organization and man- 
agement of successful farms. 

Lectures and rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 4. Fee $1.00. 
27. Research. Original investigation of a special farm management 
problem. 

FORESTRY 

Summer School work in Forestry is offered during both terms of the 
Summer Session. Courses 76, 77, 78 and 79 are open only to technical 
Forestry students of this institution or other colleges or to students 
giving evidence from former training or experience that they are quali- 
fied to handle the work. 

Courses 91, 92 and 93a are advanced courses open to graduate stu- 
dents and to undergraduates desiring to secure additional elective 
credit in the subject. 

The entire Summer Session work in Forestry is of a very practical 
nature, the purpose being to give the students practical training and 
experience in the various lines of forestry work. Field investigations 
make up the major portion of the work. The 1919 summer camp was 
established on the Arapaho National Forest in Colorado; the 1920 camp 
in Gallatin National Forest, Montana. The 1921 camp will either be 
located in Iowa or one of the adjacent states. 

76. Applied Lumbering. A detailed study of logging and milling op- 
erations in an important forest region. 

Summer Forestry Camp. Field work, 5, 3 hr. periods. Credit 5. 

77. Camp Technique. Personal equipment for camp life; ration lists 
for trips; useful knots, packing hitches and emergency equipment. 

Summer Camp. Credit 3. 

78. Forest Mensuration. Field practice in scaling logs, estimating 
timber and preparing various forest maps. 

Summer Camp. Field work, 5, 3 hr. periods. Credit 5. 

79. Field Silviculture. Field studies of forest types, natural repro- 
duction, improvement cuttings, marketing timber for cutting under 
various silvicultural systems. 

Summer Camp. Field work, 5, 3 hr. periods. Credit 5. 

91. Advanced Forest Management. Secial problems in the regula- 
tion of yield in the forest. Construction of working plans. 

Summer Camp. Field work, 5, 3 hr. periods. Credit 5. 

92. Advanced Planting. Detailed studies of forest nurseries. Spe- 
cial problems in timber planting and reforestation work. 

Summer Camp. Field work, 5, 3 hr. periods. Credit 5. 
93a. Forestry Research. Special lines of investigation selected by 
the student in consultation with the Forestry faculty. 
Summer Camp. Field work. Credit 2 to 12 hrs. 

ID 



GEOLOGY 

450. Thesis. Special work in economic geology, petrology, dynamic 
geology, structural geology, metamorphism, historical geology, or 
stratigraphic geology. Credit 5. 

510. Advanced Agricultural Geology. Work continued through 3 to 
9 quarters. Credit 3 to 10 as arranged. Fee $1.00 to $3.00 per quarter. 

520. Advanced Mining Geology. Work continued through 3 to 9 
quarters. Credit 3 to 10 as arranged. 

HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT 

110. Industrial History of the United States. Development of lead- 
ing industrial activities; transportation; industrial combinations; or- 
ganized labor; and the conservation movement. Rec. 3 or 4; credit 

3 or 4. 

214. American Government. Federal system; structure, functions, 
and powers of the national, state, and local governments; political 
parties; citizen's rights and duties. Rec. 3 or 4; credit 3 or 4. 

320. Research In Economic History. Credit 3-12. 

Note 

Students desiring four hours' credit in History 110 or 214 may reg- 
ister in these courses as scheduled for the three-hour credit, with the 
privilege of making up the additional hour by assigned readings in the 
Library. 

Students desiring credit in History 124 may take History 110 as a 
substitute. 

HOME ECONOMICS 
Vocational Education 

122. Teaching Home Economics. This course is a Summer School 
adaptation of the regular course in special methods and practice teach- 
ing. It is planned for teachers of home economics in grades and high 
schools. It includes a study of the choice of suitable subject matter, 
method of presentation, equipment, illustrative material, and a com- 
parison of the more recent text books designed for grade and high 
school classes. Special study will be made of problems in vocational 
Home Economics. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

124. Technique of Teaching College Home Economics. Grading, 
motivation, testing, selection of subject matter, etc. Conference course. 

Credit 3. 

127. Methods in Extension and Home Demonstration Work. Organ- 
ization of Farm Bureau. Home Demonstration Agent Projects. Co- 
operating Agencies. Linking up with College. Reports. Prerequisite, 

4 year college course in Home Economics. 
Rec. 2; credit 2; fee $1.00. 

Applied Design 

130a. Elementary Design. Fundamental design principles. 

Rec. 1; labs. 3, 2 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

130b. Advanced Design. Prerequisite 130a. 

Rec. J; labs. 3, 2 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

L33a. Elementary Costume Design. Prerequisites 241a, 130b. 

Rec. 1; labs. 3, 2 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

I'M. Textile Design. Prerequisite 130b. 

Rec. 1; labs. 3, 2 hr.; fee $4.00. 

1. 35a. House Design. Prerequisite 473. 

Rec. 1; labs. 3, 2 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

20 



139a. House Planning. Prerequisite 130b. 
Rec. 1; lab. 3, 2 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

Household Art 

240a. Garment Construction. Development of technique and lab- 
oratory methods. 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.50. 

241a. Garment Construction. Prerequisite 90 hrs. sewing in an ac- 
credited high school. 

Rec. 1; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.50. 

241b. Advanced Garment Construction. Prerequisite 241a or 240a, 
and 241b and 130a. 

Rec. 1; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.50. 

241c. Garment Construction. Prerequisites 241b and 133a. 

Rec. 1; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.50. 

243a. Millinery. Prerequisite 241a, 130b. 

Rec. 1; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $3.00. 

247. A Sewing Course for Teachers. Prerequisite 241b or equiva- 
lent. 

Rec. 1; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $3.00. 

Household Science 

351a. Advanced Food Preparation. Prerequisite 90 hours of food 
work in an accredited high school. 

Rec. 1; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $5.50. 

352a. Nutrition and Dietetics. First three weeks. Prerequisite 
Chem. 802, H. Ec. 350b or 351b and 471. 

Rec. 2; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 4; fee $5.50. 

353. Nutrition and Dietetics. Seminar. Prerequisite 352a. 

Rec. 2; credit 2. 

355. Meal Planning. Prerequisite 352a. 

Rec. 1; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $5.50. 

357a. Institutional Foods. Prerequisite 350b or 351a. 

Rec. 1; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee arranged. 

Household Administration 

470a. Household Management. Prerequisites Ec. Sci. 50 and 230; 
for H. Ec. and Ag. students, Ec. Sci. 50. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

470b. Practice House. At periods during the year senior students 
will spend a scheduled time in the practice house. Prerequisite or 
classification in 470a. Students preparing to teach Vocational Home 
Economics under the Smith-Hughes Act will be required to spend a 
longer period. 

471. Food: Marketing. 

Rec. 1; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $5.00. 

472b. Research. Field work in textile purchase. Prerequisites 134, 
472a. 

Hours arranged; credit 4-6. 

490. Laboratory Course for Home Demonstration Agents. Poultry 
culling; care of small fruits; poster making; pageants and plays; home 
millinery. Prerequisite four-year college course in Home Economics. 

Lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $3.00. 

500. History of Home Economics. Graduate course. 

Lectures 3; credit 3. 

510. Literature of Home Economics. Graduate course. 

Lectures 3; credit 3. 

21 



HORTICULTURE 

71a. General Horticulture. 

Lectures 3; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 4; fee $1.00. 

75a. Plant Propagation. Prerequisites Bot. 200 and Hort. 71; for 
students in Agric. and Manual Training, Hort. 71. 

Lectures 2; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $1.00. 

78. Research. Special topics for minor or major graduate work 
pertaining to general horticulture or plant breeding. May be presented 
in form of thesis. 

Credit 1 to 10. 







WOMEN ENJOY FLORICULTURE 

178. Research. Special investigation in pomology for major or 
minor graduate work. May be presented in form of thesis. 

Credit 1 to 10. 

278. Research. Special investigation for major or minor graduate 
work. May be presented in form of thesis. 

Credit 1 to 10. 

365. Vegetable Growing. Home vegetable production; planning the 
garden; handling cold frames and hot bed sash; sowing the seed; 
cultivating and harvesting the more important vegetable as grown in 
Iowa. Lectures, reference reading and practical work in the green- 
house and gardens. 

Lectures, 2 or 1; lab. 1, 3 hrs.; credit 3 or 2. 

378. Research. Special investigation in truck crops and market 
gardening, for major or minor graduate work. May be presented in 
form of thesis. 

Credit 1 to 10. 



Hygiene 1. Principles of Hygiene 
erations. 

Lecture 1; credit 1. 

22 



HYGIENE 

General and elementary consid- 



Hygiene 2. Individual Hygiene. Application of principles of hygiene 
to the life of the individual. 

Lecture 1; credit 1. 

Hygiene 3. Group and Inter-group Hygiene. Applications of the 
principles of hygiene to the college community. 

Lecture 1; credit 1. 

Hygiene 10. School Sanitation and Hygiene. For graduates. 

Lecture 2; lab. 1; credit 3. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. College Algebra. The first four weeks are devoted to a review 
of Algebra up to and including quadratics, followed by the usual topics 
of College Algebra. 

Recitations 5; credit 5. 

la. Algebra (one-half time). This course covers the work taken 
up during the first part of College Algebra and is devoted to a review 
of the fundamental principles of Algebra up to and including quad- 
ratic equations. It is an excellent preparation for any student plan- 
ning to enter college from a non-accredited high school and the record 
will be taken in lieu of the entrance examination in mathematics for 
such students. For those who have been out of high school for a 
number of years and need review or for teachers desiring to take 
examinations for certificates, it will prove a very desirable course. 
It should not be taken by those who have not had at least a year of 
work in algebra in high school or its equivalent. 

No college credit given. 

2. Plane Trigonometry. 
Prerequisite 1; recitations 5; credit 5. 

3. Plane Analytical Geometry. 
Prerequisite 2; recitations 5; credit 5. 

5a, 5b, 5c. Calculus. Differential and Integral. 
Prerequisite 3; recitations 5; credit 5. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

111. Mechanical Drawing. Use of drawing instruments, practice in 
lettering, detailing, and tracing. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2. 

151. Projective Drawing. Projection of the point, line, and plane 
as applied in the preparation of general and detail engineering draw- 
ings. Prerequisite 111. 

Rec. 1; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3. 

171. Sketching and Drawing. Interpretation and reading of ortho- 
graphic and pictorial sketches of machine details and assemblies; prep- 
aration of working drawings. Prerequisite 151. 

Lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2. 

173. Elementary Pattern Work. Simple patterns and core boxes 
for cast iron, brass, and aluminum castings. Prerequisite 143. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $4.00. 

211. Working Drawings. Orthographic and pictorial sketching of 
machines; preparation of shop drawings, lettering, tracing, and blue 
printing. Prerequisite 171. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2. 

213. Advanced Pattern Work. Special pattern work; gearing, sweep 
and molding machine work. Prerequisite 173. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $3.00. 

241. Mechanisms. Study of mechanisms, cams, and linkages; loca- 
tion of virtual centers, construction of velocity and acceleration dia- 

23 



grams. Prerequisite 211, or 171 for students in Manual Training, 
Trades and Industries. 
Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2. 

271. Elementary Machine Designing. General design and detail 
working drawings of complete simple machines. Prerequisite 241. 

Lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 1. 

272. Statics of Engineering, Principles of pure mechanics; statics, 
of rigid bodies and flexible cords; center of gravity and moment of 
inertia. Prerequisite Math. 5b. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

273. Pipe Fitting. Steam fitting and plumbing, cutting and making 
up threaded, flanged, and leaded joints, radiator and trap connections. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $3.00. 

313. Machine Work. Chipping, filing, scraping, babbiting, and fit- 
ting bearings; mill wrighting; plain turning and thread cutting. 
Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $3.00. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

110a, 110c. Elementary French. The principles of pronunciation; 
grammar; reading of modern prose. Emphasis is laid upon the oral 
and written use of the language. 

Rec. 4; credit 4. 

120a. Intermediate French. Reading of modern French prose, 
plays, and some verse; grammar review and composition; conversa- 
tion. Prerequisite 110. 

Rec. 4 or 3; credit 4 or 3. 

410a. Elementary German. 

Rec. 4; credit 4. 

MUSIC 

Members of the Summer Session and others desiring instruction in 
music will be offered courses in Voice, Piano, Cello and Band Instru- 
ments during the first term of the Summer Session. Extra fees are 
charged for these lessons and must be arranged for with the Head of 
the Department of Music. Fees are payable in advance at the Treas- 
urer's office. 

One Voice lesson per week $12.50 

Two Voice lessons per week 25.00 

One Piano lesson per week 10.00 

Two Piano lessons per week 20.00 

One Cello lesson per week 10.00 

Two Cello lessons per week 20.00 

Band Instruments — 

One lesson per week 10.00 

Two lessons per week 20.00 

The practice pianos of the Department of Music will be at the dis- 
posal of the students at the following rates: One hour a day for the 
term, $1.50. 

These are the regular rates charged in this department during the 
college year. For further details address 

Tolbert MacRae, 
Head of Dept. of Music. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

200. Swimming. Instruction for beginners only. 
Labs. •',, 1 hr.; fee $2.00. 

201. Life Saving. 
Labs. 3, 1 hr.; fee $2.00. 

24 



Swimming pool open afternoons for all who can swim. Those who 
take only swimming in Summer School will be charged only the $2.00 
registration fee. Regulation suits required. 

202. Folk Dancing and Games. 
Labs. 2, 1 hr.; fee $1.50. 

203. Aesthetic Dancing. 
Labs. 2, 1 hr.; fee $1.50. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING AND ATHLETICS 

Note. — Any student who is spending at least one-half of his time In 
one or more of the major technical lines, may spend the balance of 
his time in physical training courses. 

12a. Football Coaching and Officiating. Instruction and laboratory 
work. 

Labs. 3, 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.00. 

12b. Basketball, Wrestling, Gymnastics, and Swimming. Coaching 
and Officiating. Instruction and laboratory work. 

Labs. 3, 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.00. 

12c. Track, Coaching and Officiating. Instruction and laboratory 
work. 

Labs. 3, 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.00. 

PHYSICS 

101. Mechanics and Heat. Fundamental principles and their appli- 
cations. Prerequisite Math. 2 or 13. 

Lectures 2; rec. 1; credit 3. 

106B. General Physics. Mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity 
and applications. 

Lectures and rec. 3; credit 3. 

202. Mechanics and Heat. Force, work, energy, and power. Pre- 
requisite Math. 2. 

Lectures and rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $1.50. 

203. Electricity. Prerequisite 202. 

Lectures and rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $1.50. 

204. Sound and Light. Prerequisite 203. 
Lectures and rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $1.50. 

Note. — The three courses, 202, 203, and 204 combined, meet the re- 
quirements for the first grade certificate credit. 
208. Mechanics and Heat. Prerequisite Math. 2. 
Lectures 2; rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 5; fee $1.50. 
210. Sound and Light. Prerequisite 209. 
Lectures 2; rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 5; fee $1.50. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

1. General Psychology. Study of the normal adult human mind. 

Rec. 5; credit 5. 

14. Mental Tests. Their application in vocational and industrial 
guidance and selection. Very important for teachers, employers, and 
vocational counselors. Prerequisite 1 or 5. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

20. Educational Psychology. A treatment of special phases of Gen- 
eral and Genetic Psychology which are most applicable to education. 

Rec. 4; credit 4. 

25. Childhood and Adolescence. Characteristics of childhood; crit- 
ical changes of early adolescence. Suggestions for parents, the Study 
Club, Parent-teacher associations. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

25 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 

22. The Fundamentals of Public Speaking. Attention is especially 
given to voice building and expression. 

Rec. 2; credit 2. 

23. Interpretation. Methods of vocal interpretation, criticism, and 
delivery. Each student is instructed privately at stated intervals 
throughout the quarter. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

30. Extempore Speech. The fundamental principles of speech or- 
ganization and delivery. 
Rec. 2 or 3; credit 2 or 3. 

SOILS 

151. Soils. Identification, mapping and description of soil types. 
Origin and classification. Soil areas, types and problems in Iowa. 
Recitations 2; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 3%; fee $2.50. 




ON THE FARM CROPS AND SOILS EXPERIMENT FARM 



171. Special Problems in Soil Physics. Experiments dealing with 
the physical properties of soils and their effect on crop production. 
Investigations 9 hrs.; credit 3; fee $2.50. 

251. Soil Fertility. General principles of fertility. Studies of sam- 
ples of soil from the home farm or any other soil. 

Prerequisite Chem. 751; rec. 2; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 3V 3 ; fee $3.00. 

252. Manures and Fertilizers. Farmyard manure. Commercial fer- 
tilizers, incomplete and complete. Influence on soil fertility. 

Prerequisite 2. r >l; rec. 2; labs. 2, 2 hrs.; credit 3V 3 ; fee $3.00. 

271. Special Problems in Soil Fertility. Experiments dealing with 
the problem of maintaining and increasing the crop producing power 
of soils. 

Investigations 9 hrs.; credit 3; fee $3.00. 

281. Research in Soil Fertility. Experiments to test the efficiency 
of certain treatments; value of fertilizing materials. 

Credit 1 to 10; fee $3.00. 

26 



3S1. Research In Soil Bacteriology. (Bact. 381.) Field, green- 
house or laboratory experiments on bacterial activities in the soil. 

Credit 1 to 10; fee $3.00. 

451. Soil Management. Productiveness of particular types or 
classes of soils; utilization; soil conservation; special soils. 

Prerequisite 251; recitations 3; credit 3. 

481. Research in Soil Management. Soil management under live- 
stock, grain, mixed or truck systems of farming. 

Credit 1 to 10. 

571. Special Problems in Soil Surveying. Study of problems en- 
countered in surveying and mapping soils and the classification of 
types. 

Investigation 9 hrs.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

TRADES AND INDUSTRIES 

1. Vocational Drawing. Elementary mechanical drawing for voca- 
tional teachers. 

Labs. 2, 3 hrs.; credit 2. 

2. Advanced Vocational Drawing. Drawing and methods of pres- 




AUTO MECHANICS LABORATORY 

entation and outlining of drawing courses for vocational schools. Pre- 
requisite, Vocational Drawing 1 or equivalent. 

Labs. 2, 3 hrs.; credit 2. 

14. Studies in Elementary Shopwork. Shop organization, wood 
technology courses of study, tools and equipment. The object of this 
course is to furnish the student a foundation for teaching Junior High 
School shopwork. Prerequisite, preceded or accompanied by 23. 

Lectures and recitations 3; credit 3. 

16. Auto Mechanics for Vocational Teachers. Two parts of six 
weeks each covering general engine operation and repair, chassis re- 
pair and special instruction in lighting, starting and ignition. Stu- 
dents may be allowed to take one other study. 

Lect. and rec. 3; lab. 3, 3 hr.; credit 6; fee $5.00 for each part of 
the course. 

27 



18. Furniture Making. A shop course in furniture making to ac- 
company T.I. 20. Emphasizes principles of good construction, propor- 
tion of parts, inlaying and turning as decorative features. Prerequi- 
site, 23 and 26 or equivalent. 

Labs. 3, 3 hrs.; credit 3; fee $5.00. 

23. Elementary Woodwork. Care and adjustment of tools, princi- 
ples of planing, squaring and simple construction. Making of projects 
for instruction purposes. Prerequisite, accompanied by 14. 

Labs. 3, 3 hrs.; credit 3; fee $5.00. 

26. Advanced Woodwork. Continuation of 23 including the study 
of power tools and their uses in school shops, cabinet making and 
joinery. Projects for Smith-Hughes classes. 

Labs. 3, 3 hrs.; credit 3; fee $5.00. 

40. Trade Analysis. The field covered in the various trades, in- 
cluding the most effective methods of training for preparing men to 
follow these trades. Prerequisites Voc. Ed. 51 and 142 and preferably 
Voc. Ed. 57. 

Rec. and Lee. 3; credit 3. 

142. Teaching Manual Training, Trade and Industry. Courses of 
study, lesson plans, demonstrations, organization and administration 
of Smith-Hughes work. Prerequisites 51 and 52. 

Rec. and lab. 3; credit 3. 

144. Foreman Training. An analysis of the field of responsibility, 
points in foremanship, and method of teaching these to foremen ac- 
cording to best practice. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

VETERINARY ANATOMY 

713. Research in Anatomy. Problems relating to Animal Hus- 
bandry, Physiology, Pathology, and Surgery. Anatomical problems of 
systemic, topographic, or comparative nature. 

Lab. 3 or 4; credit 3 or 4. 

714. Research in Microscopic Anatomy. Physiological histology; 
problems of importance to pathology, or those relating to histogenesis 
or morphology. 

3-10 hr. as arranged. 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

51. Methods of Teaching Vocational Subjects. 
Rec. 3; credit 3. 

52. High School Problems. Organization, management, and prob- 
lems of the present day high school. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

53. The Industrial High School. Sources and development of the 
high school curriculum, with particular reference to the industrial and 
vocational subjects. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

54. Principles of Vocational Education. Fundamental principles ap- 
plied to vocational subjects. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

55. History of Industrial and Vocational Education. Chief emphasis 
upon the modern movement. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

57. Vocational Education. Development and present best practice, 
pre- vocational education, and vocational guidance. 

Bee. '',; credit 3. 

58. Rural Education. With particular reference to the Interests of 






the county superintendents, the normal training teacher, and the super- 
intendent or teacher in the consolidated or village school. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

109. School Administration and Supervision. Modern methods for 
the teacher of agriculture, who is constantly being used in the con- 
solidated and smaller town systems of the state as principal or super- 
intendent. 

Prerequisite 51; rec. 3; credit 3. 

120. Research in Education. Problems for the advanced student, 
(a) Courses of study in Agriculture: The organization of Secondary 
Courses in Agriculture on a problem or vocational basis, and adapted 
to local conditions, (b) Vocational and Industrial Surveys: To form 
an intelligent basis for the organization of vocational courses in agri- 
culture, home economics, trades and industries. Hours by appoint- 
ment. 

122. Teaching Home Economics. Special methods of teaching home 
economics, from the standpoint of the special teacher and supervisor. 
A summer session adaptation of the special methods features of course 
121a. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

124. Technique of Teaching College Home Economics. Grading, 
motivation, testing, selection of subject matter, etc. 

Conference course; credit 3. 

132a. Teaching Agriculture. Special methods of teaching agricul- 
ture, from the standpoint of the experienced teacher and supervisor. 
A summer session adaptation of the special methods work of course 
131a. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

132b. Teaching Agriculture. Continuation of 132a. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

142. Teaching Trades and Industries. Courses of study, lesson 
plans, demonstrations, organization and administration of Smith- 
Hughes work. Prerequisites 51 and 52. 

Rec. and lab. 3; credit 3. 

ZOOLOGY. 

101a. Human Physiology. Fundamentals of physiology, anatomy and 
morphology of the various systems as they occur in the human mech- 
anism, with theoretical and practical applications. Practical dissec- 
tions of selected materials and technique of physiological experimen- 
tation form an integral part of the laboratory work. Adapted to the 
needs of Home Economics students and others who desire fundamental 
knowledge and training in the science. By special arrangement teach- 
ers and others may take certain portions for more or less credit than 
here specified, according to work completed. 

Lecture 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 3. Fee $2.00. 

180. Elementary Research in Physiology. Applied physiology for 
advanced undergraduates and graduates. Individual problems to begin 
research and find the literature. Prerequisites 101 and 110 or 111, 
preferably all. 

Conferences and assignment. Credit 1 to 3, according to work done. 

181. Advanced Research in Physiology. For graduates. Investiga- 
tion in some physiological subject suitable for a thesis. As arranged. 

380. Research. In Economic Entomology. Hours and credits to be 
arranged. A. For undergraduates. B. For graduate students. 

408. Methods of Apiary Practice. Sources of nectar and pollen; 
supplies and apparatus. Prerequisite 407. 

Rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. Credit 3. Fee $3.00. 

480. Research in Apiculture. Hours and credits to be arranged. 

29 



GRADUATE WORK IN SUMMER SCHOOL 

The student expecting to do graduate work in summer school will 
find a more detailed account of method of matriculation and require- 
ments for degrees in the graduate catalogue, which may be had on re- 
quest from the college registrar or from the dean of the Graduate 
College. 

Graduate Enrollment 

Graduates of approved colleges may be admitted to graduate stand- 
ing in Iowa State College by filling out duplicate blank applications 
for admission and filing these together with a complete authoritative 
transcript of college records, including entrance credits. Upon ap- 
proval of the application a matriculation card will be issued by the col- 
lege registrar. Enrollment in graduate work does not necessarily 
imply candidacy for a degree. 

After registration in the Graduate College the student may be ad- 
mitted to candidacy for a degree after total residence of at least 
one quarter, providing the specific prerequisite requirements of the 
department in which major work is to be taken have been met. 
This must be done at least one quarter before the conferring of a mas- 
ter's degree, and, one year (or in exceptional cases two quarters) be- 
fore the conferring of a doctor's degree. 

Advanced Degrees 

Master of Science in Agriculture. Teachers of agriculture and others 
who are graduates of standard college courses in agriculture may take 
work looking toward the degree Master of Science in various phases 
of agriculture, such as Animal Husbandry, Horticulture, Farm Crops, 
Soils, Dairying, Farm Management, Agricultural Engineering and Ag- 
ricultural Education. 

Master of Science in Vocational Education. Graduates of standard 
colleges in non-technical courses who have had sufficient work in edu- 
cation and psychology to be eligible for a first grade state certificate 
may take major work in education and minor work in agriculture, in 
home economics, or in trades and industries looking toward the mas- 
ter's degree. 

Students who minor in agriculture must choose at least 30 quarter 
credit hours from the following agricultural subjects (where one sub- 
ject only is listed for a department this must be included, and at least 
half of the courses listed for each department when more than one 
are given must also be included). 

Animal Husbandry, 101, 2 credits; 102, 2 credits; 103, 2 credits; 
111, 3V 3 credits; 112, 3}£ credits; 113, Zy s credits. 

Farm Crops. 151, 4 credits; 152, 4 credits. 

Dairying. 15, 4 credits. 

Horticulture. 71, 4 credits. 

Soils. 151, 3V 3 credits; 251, Z% credits; 252, S% credits. , 

Any science prerequisites for particular subjects must be met. 

Students desiring to take minor work in trades and industries (in- 
cluding manual training) must complete mathematics through an- 
alytical geometry, and secure credit in the following subjects: 

Trades and Industries. 1, 2 credits (or M. E. Ill, 2 credits). 

Trades and Industries. 2, 2 credits (or M. E. 151, 3 credits). 

Trades and Industries. 14, 3 credits; 23, 3 credits. 

Mechanical Engineering. 171, 3 credits; 313, 2 credits. 

They are required also to complete at least 15 hours in subject ; 
chosen from the following list: 

Trades and Industries. 16, 5 credits; 18, 3 credits; 20, 3 credits; 
20, 3 credits; 27, 3 credits. 

30 



Mechanical Engineering. 173, 2 credits; 211, 2 credits; 213, 2 credits; 
272, 3 credits; 273, 2 credits. 

Agricultural Engineering. 51, 2 credits; 52, 2 credits; 55, 2 credits; 
60, 4 credits; 74, 2 credits. 

Students desiring to take minor work in Home Economics must 
complete at least 30 hours in subjects offered by this department. 

Master of Science in Home Economics. Graduates of standard 
courses in home economics may take work looking toward the mas- 
ter's degree with major work in the departments of the Division of 
Home Economics. 

Master of Science. Graduate students who have had adequate un- 
dergraduate preparation may take major work looking toward the de- 
gree Master of Science in Bacteriology, Botany, Entomology, Physi- 
ology, Plant Pathology, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Agricultural 
Economics, Rural Sociology, Agricultural History, Comparative Anat- 
omy, Zoology, Geology, Comparative Physiology, Mathematics, or 
Physics. 

Doctor of Philosophy. Those who wish to pursue work in summer 
school looking toward the degree Doctor of Philosophy should secure 
information as to requirements from the graduate catalogue. Many re- 
search problems can be undertaken to advantage during the summer 
season, particularly in agriculture and the sciences most closely re- 
lated to agriculture. 

Requirements for Master's Degree 

For the Degree Master of Science in Vocational Education. A mini- 
mum of thirty quarter credit hours must be completed in graduate sub- 
jects in the Department of Vocational Education, and an additional 
thirty quarter credit hours in agriculture, home economics or trades 
and industries as outlined above. 

For the Degree Master of Science in Other Subjects. At least thirty 
quarter credit hours must be completed in graduate subjects in the 
major department, and not to exceed 15 quarter credit hours in minor 
graduate work, a total of at least 45 hours. 

Residence Requirements. The minimum summer school residence 
for a master's degree is 24 weeks, or 4 six weeks sessions. Students 
taking graduate work in summer school may do not to exceed one-third 
of the work for the degree in absentia. For details concerning work 
done in absentia, see the graduate catalogue, or write the Dean of the 
Graduate College. 

Subjects Given in Summer School for Which Graduate Credit May 

be Secured 

Column I includes numbers of subjects offered to graduate students 
only, for major or minor credit. 

Column II includes numbers of subjects offered both to graduates 
and to advanced undergraduates, for either major or minor credit. 

Column III includes numbers of subjects that may be taken for 
minor credit only, by graduate students. 

Column IV includes numbers of subjects that may be taken for minor 
credit only by students taking major work in vocational education. 



31 



First Session 



Name of Department 


/ 


// 


III 


IV 


Agricultural Engineering 


106a, 106b 






51, 52, 54, 55 
60 


Agricultural Journalism 


42 


29a 




28a 


Animal Husbandry 


500, 505, 510 
515 


300, 310, 434 


218 


101,102,103 
111,112,113 

224, 240 


Bacteriology- 


31b, 75, 173 

262 




3a, 3b, 3c, 4 




Botany 


148aC,204, 
325, 326, 416 
481a, 604b 


325, 415, 609 


320 




Chemistry 


563, 765 
803, 841, 901 




802 




Civil Engineering 


1109, 1110, 
1111, 1112 








Dairying 


80, 81, 82, 
143 






15 


Economics 


159, 350 
380, 160 


340, 135, 315 






Farm Crops 


181,182,281a 
281b, 281c 






151, 152, 153 








154, 160 




282 








Farm Management 


27 




22 


21 


Forestry 










(in Summer Camp) 


91, 92, 93a 








Geology 


450, 510, 520 








History 


320 




124 




Home Economics 


124, 353, 500 


135a, 135b, 


351b,375a, 


130a, 130b 




510, 472b 


352a, 352b, 
355, 470a 
134 


471 


133a, 139a 
240a, 241a 
241b, 241c 
243a, 247 
351a, 122 


Horticluture 


78, 178, 278 
378 






71a 


Mathematics 






5a, 5b, 5c 




Mechanical 








111,151,171 


Engineering 








173,211,213 
273, 313 


Physics 






208, 210 




Psychology 






14, 25 




Soils 


281,381,481 
571 




151, 171,251 
252,271,351 

852, 451 




Trades & Industry 








1, 2, 14, 16 
18, 23, 26, 
40 


Veterinary Anatomy 


713, 714 








Vocational Education 


120, 124 


58, 109 
122, 182a, 
182b, 142 


51, 53, 57 




Zoology &pSntoniology 


180,1X1,380 
408 




101m, 





V/l 



Second Session 



Name of Department 



II 



III 



IV 



Agricultural Engineering 
Agricultural Journalism 
Animal Husbandry 

Bacteriology- 
Botany 

Civil Engineering 
Dairy 
Economics 
Farm Crops 



Farm Management 
Forestry 
History 
Horticulture 

Psychology 
Soils 

Trades and Industries 

Vocational Education 
Zoology & Entomology 



107 

500, 505, 510 

515 
31b, 75, 173 
262 

148aC, 325, 
326, 416, 
481a, 604b, 
1109, 1110, 
1111, 1112 
80, 81, 82, 
143 

159, 160, 350 
380 

281a, 281b, 
281c, 282, 
181, 182 
27 

320 

78, 178, 278. 
378 

281, 381, 481 
571 



120a, 120b 

380, 408 



61, 77 



434 



340, 135 



151, 152 



75a 



79, 80, 74 
28a 

111,112,113 
400, 402 



54, 55 



20 
151,251,252 



52, 53 



76,77 
365 



1, 2, 16, 18, 
23, 26, 40 



33 



GENERAL COURSES 

The Iowa State College offers in the Summer Session, as during the 
regular year, courses of a non-collegiate grade to help groups who are 
particularly interested in the special lines of work offered by the 
College. 

During the summer these courses consist of home-makers' courses for 
mature women and special courses in agriculture and trades and in- 
dustries for government students. These courses are described briefly 
below. 

HOME-MAKERS' COURSES 

The division of Home Economics will offer beginning and continua- 
tion courses of a very practical nature for home-makers of the state 
who may desire to take advantage of the summer work. This work 
has always been very popular because of its intensely practical nature 
and this summer it has been decided to offer all courses coordinately, 
that is, without any prerequisite requirements. 

N. 1A. Food Preparation and Service — Principles of cookery; de- 
velopment of technique and skill; planning, preparing and serving 
breakfasts. 

Rec. 2; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 4; fee $5.00. 

N. 10a. The Essentials of Sewing — Fundamental stitches; use and 
adjustment of sewing machine. Making of underwear and laboratory 
apron. Emphasis placed on choice of materials, designs and advan- 
tages of correctness of patterns. Study of cotton materials. Students 
provide materials subject to approval. 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.50. 

N. 20a. Millinery — Paper patterns, buckram and willow frames, se- 
lecting, preparing, altering and covering commercial frames. Use of 
glue and stitches. Velvet, satin, sport and lace made. Trimmings and 
renovation. Students provide material subject to approval. 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $3.00. 

N. 30a. Design — Elementary Design. Principles of design, propor- 
tion, subordination, rhythm, balance; value of tones and color theory; 
perspective. These fundamental principles are applied to simple ab- 
stract problems in lettering and spacing; furnish basis for specific 
problems. 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 3- hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

RURAL AND GRADE TEACHERS' COURSES 

Teachers should be interested in an opportunity of attending Iowa 
State College and taking work in the newer industrial subjects where 
there is abundant opportunity in Home Economics, Agriculture, Manual 
Training, related science and education. 

First Grade Certificate Subjects. Teachers will find at the Iowa 
State College an opportunity of preparing for examination in the 
first grade certificate subjects — algebra, physics, economics and civics. 
These subjects may be pursued in regular college classes and, while 
the work is possibly more difficult than needed simply for the exam- 
ination, yet many students are willing to do the additional work nec- 
essary to carry a regular col logo course. See especially the following 



in the descriptions of courses of the various departments and the 
Bchedule of recitations: Math, la, Hist. 124, Econ. 51, Phys. 202, 
203, 204. 

Teachers who are high school graduates should arrange for en- 
trance requirements, so that, after completing work in any college 
course, statement of credits may be received in the usual way. 



GOVERNMENT AND NON-COLLEGIATE COURSES IN AGRICUL- 
TURE, TRADES AND INDUSTRIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS. 

A. E. N51. Forge Shop. Forge and welding iron and steel. Mak- 
ing, hardening and tempering small tools. Designed to be helpful in 
repair of farm equipment. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $3.00. 

A. E. N54. Practical Farm Mechanics. Plan and equipment of a 
farm shop; use of farm shop tools in the repair and maintenance of 
farm equipment. 

Labs 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $3.00. 

A. E. N60. Farm Machinery and Farm Motors. Construction, ad- 
justment, operation, and care of farm machinery and farm motors. 
Measurement and transmission of power. 

Rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 4; fee $2.00. 

A. E. N61. Gas Engines and Tractors. To familiarize the student 
with the construction, operation, adjustment, and care of gasoline and 
oil engines and tractors. 

Prerequisite N60. Rec. 1; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $2.00. 

Ag. N6. Practical Project. This will include training by method of 
the practical project for Federal Board students along special lines 
such as animal husbandry, poultry husbandry, fruit growing, horticul- 
ture, beekeeping, and others. 

Credits 1-5. 

A. H. N101. Types and Market Classes of Beef and Dual-Purpose 
Cattle. Judging; study of types, carcasses, markets, and market classi- 
fications. 

Rec. and labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.00. 

A. H. Nlll. Breeds of Beef and Dual-Purpose Cattle. Judging rep- 
resentatives of different breeds; origin, history, type, and adaptability 
of the breeds. 

Prerequisite N101. Rec. 2; labs. 2, 2 hr.;' credit 3V 3 ; fee $1.00. 

A. H. N207. Grading and Marketing Live Stock. Prerequisites N101, 
N102, N103. 

Lee. and labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $2.00. 

A. H. N223. Feed, Care and Management of Beef Cattle and Hogs. 

Rec. 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $2.00. 

A. H. N231, N232, N233, N234. Feeding Beef Cattle, Hogs, Sheep 
and Horses. 

Credit 4. 

A. H. N260. Herd Book Study. Lectures on pedigrees, blood-lines, 
and families. Principles of breeding, selection and improvement of 
live stock. Prerequisites N101, N102, N103. 

Rec. 2; credit 2. 

Botany NIOOa. Agricultural Botany. Life history of the plants as 
related to agriculture. 

Rec. 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $1.00. 

Botany N101. Farm Weeds and Seeds; Injurious Weeds. Seed 
analysis and weed eradication. 

Lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 1; fee $1.00. 

35 



Chemistry N67. Agricultural Chemistry. Chemistry of the farm re- 
lating especially to the elements essential to plant life and animal 
feeding. 

Rec. 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $3.00. 

Common Branches, Work in the common branches will be offered 
as needed by the government vocational students, the same as during 
the regular year. 

Dairy N17. Principles of Dairying. Secretion and composition of 
milk; testing of dairy products; separation and care of milk and cream; 
cheese-making; butter-making, and ice cream making. 

Rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 4; fee $2.00. 

English N30a. Practice of English. Training in note taking and 
outlining. Writing of business letters. Attention to clearness and 
correctness of expression. 

English N30b. Elementary Composition. Continuation of N30a. 

Credit 3; rec. 3. 

English N30c. Rhetoric and Composition. 

Rec. 3; credit 3. 

F. C. Nil. Corn Production. Adaptation of the corn plant. Vari- 
ous phases of corn growing; judging, breeding, feeding, marketing. 
Insects and diseases. 

Rec. 2; lee. and labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 4; fee $1.50. 

F. C. N12. Small Grain Production. Importance; growing the crop, 
harvesting, threshing, marketing; market grading; uses; diseases and 
insects; methods of improvement. 

Rec. 2; lee. and labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 4; fee $1.50. 

F. M. N51. Farm Accounts. Inventories, crop and livestock ac- 
counts and their interpretation. 

Rec. 1; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2V 3 ; fee $1.50. 

F. M. N52. Factors Influencing Success In Farming. 

Prerequisite N51. Rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 4; fee $1.00. 

Hort N75b. Small Fruits. 

Rec. 2; lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $1.00. 

Hort. N201. Vegetable Gardening. Classes may specialize in truck 
farming, market gardening, or canning crops. 

Rec. 2; credit 3; fee $1.00. 

Hort. N401. Fruit and Vegetable Products. 

Labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 1%; fee $2.00. 

Math. N31a. Agricultural Arithmetic. Principles of Arithmetic 
needed in the practical problems of farm management. 

Rec. 3; credits 3. 

Math. N35a. Plane Geometry. 

Rec. 4; credit 4. 

Math. N37b. Algebra. 

Rec. 5; credit 5. 

Soils N41. Soil Physics. Origin, formation, and classification of 
soils; drainage; treatment of alkali, gumbo, and peat. 

Rec. 2; lee. and lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 3; fee $1.00. 

Soils N42. Soil Fertility. Maintenance of soil fertility; systems of 
rotation; influence of organisms upon the fertility of the soil. 
Rec. 2; lee. and lab. 1, 2 hr.; credit 3; fee $1.00. 

Zool. Nl. Beekeeping. Elementary course in behavior, life history 
and development. 

Rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $3.00. 

Zool. N2. Beekeeping. Apiary practice; supplies and apparatus. 

Prerequisite Nl. Rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hi-.; credit 3; fee $3.00. 

36 






Zool. N4. General Apiculture. Elementary course on bee behavior, 
life history, the use of apiary equipment, and methods of management. 

Rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 

T. I. Nla. Mechanical Drafting. Drawing. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2. 

T. I. Nib. Mechanical Drafting. Drawing. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2. 

T. I. Nlc. Mechanical Drafting. Drawing. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2. 

T. I. N2a, N2b. Shop Work in Wood. Use, sharpening and adjust- 
ment of hand tools; elementary framing and joinery'; wood turning and 
use of tools. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $5.00. 

T. I. N7a, N7b, N7c. Shop Work in Metal. Use of hand tools, chip- 
ping, filing, scraping, and pipe fitting. Use of lathe, shaper, drill press, 
etc. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $5.00. 

T. I. EN2. Electric Wiring. A practical course in the wiring of 
dwellings and buildings for light and power, including a study of code 
rules. 

Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $2.00. 



37 



SCHEDULE OF RECITATIONS 



Where schedules can be changed to the advantage of some students 
without inconvenience to others, changes will be made on Tuesday- 
evening, June 14. 

Recitations daily unless otherwise specified. 

Abbreviations: A. E. — Agricultural Engineering. A. J. — Agricultural 
Journalism. Ag. H. — Agricultural Hall. A. G. — Auto Garage. A. H. — 
Animal Husbandry. Bac. — Bacteriology. Bot. — Botany. Cen. — Central 
Building. Chem. — Chemistry. C. B. — Chemistry Building. C. S. — Car- 
penter Shop. D. B. — Dairy Building. Econ. — Economics. En. A. — Engi- 
neering Annex. En. H. — Engineering Hall. Eng. — English. F. C. — 
Farm Crops. F. Mang. — Farm Management. For. — Forestry. F. S. — 
Forge Shop. Geo. — Geology. Gym. — Gymnasium. H. E. — Home Econom- 
ics. H. E. B. — Home Economics Building. Hist. — History. Hort. — Horti- 
culture. Lab. — Laboratory. Lit. — Literature. Loc. Lab.— Locomotive 
Laboratory. M. H. — Margaret Hall. Math. — Mathematics. M. E. — Me- 
chanical Engineering. M. Lang. — Modern Language. O. A. — Old Agri- 
cultural Hall. O. H. Lab. — Old Horticultural Laboratory. Pav. — Pavil- 
ion. P. E. — Physical Education. P. T. — Physical Training. P. S. — Pat- 
tern Shop. Phys. — Physics. Psych. — Psychology. Pub. Sp. — Public 
Speaking. R. — Room. Rec. — Recitation. Sc. B. — Science Building. T. 
I. — Trades and Industries. Trans. B. — Transportation Building. Vet. An. 
— Veterinary Anatomy. Voc. Ed. — Vocational Education. Zool. — Zoology. 






COLLEGIATE COURSES 

(First Half) 



C our be 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


A. E. 51 


Lab. 9-12 M. W. F. S. 


F. S. 


A. E. 52 


Lab. 2-5 M. T. Th. F. 


C. S. 


A. E. 54 


Lab. 8-11 M. T. Th. F. 


C. S. 


A. E. 55 


Lab. 2-5 M. W. F. S. 


F. S. 


A. E. 60 


Rec. 8, Lab. 2-5 T. Th. 


204 O. A. 


■A. E. 106a, 106b 


As arranged 




A. J. 28a 


Rec. 7 


19 Ag. II. 


A. J. 29a 


Rec. 8 


19 Ag. H. 


A. J. 33 


Rec. 1. W. Th. F. S. 


19 As. H. 


A. H. 101 


Lab. 7-9, 3-5 M. W. F. S. 


Pav. 2 


A. H. 102 


Lab. 10-12 M. W. F. S. 


Pav. 2 


A. II. 103 


Lab. 1-3 M. W. F. S. 


Pav. 2 


A. H. Ill 


Loc. 3 M. W. F. S., Lab. 1-3 M. W. 






F. S. 


109 Ag. 11 


A. ff. 112 


Lee. 9 M. W. F. S.. Lab. 10-12 M. 






W. F. 8. 


117 Ag. IT. 


A. II. 113 


Lee. 9 M. W. V. S., Lab. 7-9 M. TV. 






F. S. 


109 Ag. H 


A. II. 218 


Lee. 8 


109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 224 


Lee. 11 M. T. F. S., Lab 7-9 T. Th. 


109 Ag. 11 


A. II. 240 


IjCC 10 and 4 daily, except Sat. 


109 Ag. 11. 


A. II. 300 


Rec. 3, Lab. 7-9 and 1-3 T. Th. 


117 Ag. II. 


A. II. 310 


Rec. 1, and 11 M. T. Th. S. 


117 Ag. II. 


A. If. 500, 505, 






510. 515 


As arranged 




Bac. 3a, 3b, 3c 


Lee. 7, Lab. 12 hrs., 8-12 as arranged 


105 Sc. B. 


Bac. 4 


Lee. 7, Lab. 12 hrs., 8-12 as arranged 


105 Se. B. 



38 



Course 



Hour of Recitation 



Room 



Bar. 31a. :Ub, 75, 

173, 262 
Bot. 135 
Bot. 320 
Bot. 415a 

Bot. 148aG, 325, 
326, 415b, 416, 
IS la, 604b, 609 

Chem. 502 a & b 

Chem. 502c 

Chem. 503 

Chem. 504 a & b 

Chem. 504c ~ 

Chem. 509a 

Chem. 509b 

Chem. 751a 

Chem. 751b 

Chem. 752 
Chem. 775 
Chem. 776 
Chem. 802 
Chem. 521 a, b, c 

563 a, b, c, 765 

803, 841, 901 
Dairy 15 
Dairv 65 
DairV 80, 81, 82, 

143 
Econ. 50 
Econ. 315 
Econ. 135. 159, 

160, 340, 350, 

380 
Eng. 19 
Eng. 21 
Eng. 143 
Eng. 251a 
Eng. 441 
F. C. 151 
F. C. 152 
F. C. 153 
F. C. 154 

F. C. 160. 181, 182 
281a, 281b, 281c, 

282 
F. Mang. 21 

F. Mang. 22 
F. Mang. 27 
Forestry 78, 79, 

91, 92, 93a 
Ceo. 450, 510, 520 
Hist. 110 
Hist. 214 
Hist, 320 
H. E. 122 



As arranged 

Rec. 4 T. Th., Lab. 3-5 M. W. F. S. 
Rec. 7 M. W. F. S., Lab. 9-12 
Rec. 11 M. W. F. S., Lab. 1-4 M. W. 
F. S. 



As arranged 

Rec. 8, Lab. 10-12 T. Th. S. 

Rec. 8, Lab. 10-12 

Rec. 2, Lab. 8-10 M. W. F. 

Rec. 9 M. T. W. F., Lab. 10-12 

Rec. 9, Lab. 10-12 

Rec. 8 and two extra Rec, Lab. 10-12 

Rec. 2, Lab. 8-10 M. W. F. 

Rec. 10 M. T. W. Th., Lab. 8-10 M. 

W. F. S. 
Rec. 11 T. W. Th. F., Lab. 7-11 T. 

Th. 
Rec. 2 T. W. Th. F., Lab. 7-11 T. Th. 
Rec. 11 Lab., 8-11 M. W. F. S. 
Rec. 8 Lab. 9-11 
Rec. 9, Lab. 10-12 



As arranged 

Lee. 7, Lab. 1-4 T. Th. 

Lee. 9 M. T. W. Th. Lab. 1-3 M. W. 

As arranged 
Rec. 2 
Rec. 3 



As arranged 

Rec. 9 

Rec. 10 

Rec. 1 M. T. Th. F. 

Rec. 3 

Rec. 1 

Rec. 1, Lab. 7-10 T. Th. 

Rec. 11, Lab. 7-10 W. S. 

Rec. 1 M. W. F. S., Lab. 7-10 M. F. 

Rec. 10, Lab. 2-5 T. Th. 



As arranged 

Rec. 1 T. Th., Lab. 7-9 and 3-5 T. 
Th. 
Rec. 10, Lab. 3-5 M. W. F. 
As arranged 

As arranged 
As arranged 
Rec. 11 
Rec. 2 
As arranged 
Rec. 8 



312 Cen. 
312 Cen. 

312 Cen. 



286 C 
286 C 
286 C 
286 C 
286 C 
12 C. B. 
12 C. B. 



286 C. B. 



286 C. 
125 C. 
125 C. 
181 C. 
125 C. 



11 D. B. 
25 D. B. 



307 Ag. H. 
307 Ag. H. 



4 Cen. 
4 Cen. 
102 Cen. 
4 Cen." 
102 Cen. 
307 Ag. H. 
307 Ag. H. 

306 Ag. H. 

307 Ag. H. 



306 Ag. H 
306 Ag. H. 



Summer Camp 

208 Cen. 
208 Cen. 



10 H. E. B. 



39 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


H. E. 127 


Rec. 2 M. T. W. Th. 


10 H. E. B. 


H. E. 130a 


Rec. 8 T. F., Lab. 10-12 


Art Stuido 


H. E. 130b 


Rec. 9 M. Th., Lab. 1-3 


Art Studio 


H. E. 133a 


Rec. 3 W. S., Lab 10-12 


Art Studio 


H. E. 134 


Rec. 9M.W, Lab. 10-12 


Art Studio 


H. E. 135a 


Rec. 3 T. F., Lab. 1-3 


Art Studio 


H. E. 139a 


Rec. 2 W. S., Lab. 8-10 


Art Studio 


H. E. 240a 


Rec. 11 T. F., Lab. 9-12 






M. W. Th. S. 


110 H.E. B. 


H. E. 241a 


Rec. 1 Th. S., Lab. 1-4 M. T. W. F. 


110 H. E. B. 


H. E. 241b 


Rec. 1 W. S., Lab. 1-4 M. T. Th. F. 


102 H. E. B. 


H. E. 241c 


Rec. 10 M. Th., Lab. 8-11 






T. W. F. S. 


102 H. E. B. 


H. E. 243a 


Rec. 1 W. S., Lab. 1-4 M. T. Th. F. 


100 H. E. B 


H. E. 247 


Rec. 11 W. S., Lab. 9-12 M. T. Th. F. 


111 H. E. B. 


H. E. 351a 


Rec. 9 M. F., Lab. 7-10 T. W. Th. S. 


202 H. E. B. 


H. E. 352a 


Rec. 8 T. W. Th. F., Lab. 9-12 T. W. 






Th. S. 


200 H. E. B. 


H. E. 355 


Rec. 11 M. F., Lab. 9-12 T. W. Th. S. 


208 H. E. B. 


H. E. 357a 


Rec. 11 M. S., Lab. 9-12 T. W. Th. F. 


H. E. Annex 


H. E. 470a 


Rec. 7 


10 H. E. B. 


H. E. 471 


Rec. 7 W. F., Lab. 1-4 M. T. Th. F. 


208 H. E. B. 


H. E. 124, 353, 






470b, 472b, 500, 






510 


As arranged 




Hort. 71a 


Rec. 10, Lab. 2-5 T. Th. 


207 Ag. H. 


Hort. 78, 178, 278 






378 


As arranged 




Hygiene 1, 2, 3 


Rec. 7 


208 Cen. 


Hygiene 10 


Rec. 10 M. T. W. Th. 






Lab. 4 his. as arranged 


105 Sc. B. 


Math. la. 


Rec. 8 


213 Cen. 


Math. 1 


Rec. 7, and 1 M. T. Th. F. 


214 Cen. 


Math. 2 


Rec. 8, and 3 M. T. W. F. 


214 Cen. 


Math. 3 


Rec. 7, and 3 M. T. W. F. 


213 Cen. 


Math. 5a 


Rec. 7, and 2 M. T. W. Th. 


216 Cen. 


Math. 5b 


Rec. 7, and 2 M. T. Th. F. 


215 Cen. 


Math. 5c 


Rec. 8, and 2 M. T. Th. F. 


214 Cen. 


M. E. Ill 


As arranged 8-12, 1-5 except Sat. 


403 En. H. 


M. E. 151 


Rec. 8 M. W.. Lab. as arranged 8-12 






1-5 except Sat. 


403 En. H. 


M. E. 171 


As arranged 8-12, 1-5 except Sat. 


403 En. H. 


M. E. 173 


As arranged 8-12 or 1-5 except Sat. 


P. S. 


M. E. 211 


As arranged 8-12, 1-5 except Sat. 


403 En. H. 


M. E. 213 


As arranged 8-12, 1-5 except Sat. 


P. S. 


M. E. 241 


As arranged 8-12, 1-5 except Sat. 


403 En. H. 


M. E. 271 


As arranged 8-12, 1-5 except Sat. 


403 En. H. 


M. E. 272 


Rec. 10 


205 En. H. 


M. E. 273 


Lab. as arranged 8-12, 1-5 except Sat. 


M.S. 


M. E. 313 


Lab. as arranged 8-12, 1-5 except Sat. 


M.S. 


M. Lang. 110a 


Rec. 7, and 2 hrs. as arranged 


119 Cen. 


M. Lang. 110c 


Rec. 8, and 2 hrs. as arranged 


119 Cen. 


M. Lang. 120a 


Rec. 8, and 2 hrs. as arranged 


118 Cen. 


M. Lang. 410a 


Rec. 9, and 2 hrs. as arranged 


118 Cen. 


P. E. 200 


Lab. 4 or 5 M. W. F., or 4 or 5 T. Th. 






S. 


M.H.Gym. 
M. H. Gym. 


P. E. 201 


Lab. 3 M. W. F. 


P. B. 202 


Lab. 3T. Th. 


M. H. Gym. 


i\ i;. 20:5 


Lab. 4 M. W. Th. F. 


M. H. Gym. 



4 



Course 



Hour of Recitation 



Room 



P. T. 12a 

P. T. 12b 

P. T. 12c 

Phys. 101 

Phys. 106B 

Phys. 202, 203, 204 

Phys. 208 

Phys. 210 

Psych. 1 

Psych. 14 
Psych. 25 
Pub. Sp. 22 
Pub. Sp. 23 
Pub. Sp. 30 
Soils 151 

Soils 251 

Soils 252 

Soils 451 

Soils 171, 271, 281, 

381, 481, 571 
T.I. 1 
T.I. 2 
T. I. 14 
T. I. 16 
T. I. 18 
T. I. 23 
T. I. 26 
T. I. 40 
T. I. 142 
T. I. 144 

*Vet. An. 713, 714 
Voc. Ed. 51 
Voc. Ed. 53 
Voc. Ed. 58 
Voc. Ed. 57 
Voc. Ed. 109 
Voc. Ed. 120 
Voc. Ed. 122 
Voc. Ed. 124 
Voc. Ed. 132a 
Voc. Ed. 132b 
Voc. Ed. 142 
Zool. 101a 
Zool. 180, 181, 380 

408, 480 



Lab. 8-10 

Lab. 10-12 

Lab. 2-4 

Rec. and Lee. 2 

Rec. 8 

Rec. 8 and 1, Lab. 9-12 

Rec. 9 M. T. Th. F. and 2 M. T. Th. 

F., Lab. 9-12 any two days 
Rec. 8, and 1 T. Th., Lab. 9-12 W. S. 

or as arranged 
Rec. 8, and 4 M. T. W. F. 
Rec. 2 



Rec. 
Rec. 
Rec. 
Rec. 
Rec. 

F S ' 

Rec. 8 M. W. F. S., Lab. 1-3 M. W. 

F S 
Rec. 10 M. W. F. S 

S. 
Rec. 11 



11 

10 M. T. Th. F. 
7 

11 or 8 
7 M. W. F. S., Lab. 10-12 M. W: 



Lab. 3-5 M. W. F. 



As arranged 

Lab. 8-11 M. T. Th. F. 

Lab. 1-4 M. T. Th. F. 

Rec. 1 

Lee. 8, Lab. 2-5 

Lab. 8-11 

Lab. 2-5 

Lab. 8-11 

Lee. 4 

Rec. 11 

Rec. 10 

As arranged 

Rec. 4 

Rec. 7 

Rec. 2 

Rec. 1 

Rec. 9 

As arranged 

Rec. 8 

As arranged 

Rec. 10 

Rec. 3 

Rec. 11 

Lee. 1 M. T. Th. F., Lab. 2-4 M. W. F. 

As arranged 



Gym. 
Gym. 
Gym. 

207 En. H. 
112 En. H. 
207 En. H. 

209 En. H. 

209 En. H 

210 Cen. 
210 Cen. 
210 Cen. 
311 Cen. 
311 Cen. 
311 Cen. 

7 Ag. H. 

7 Ag. H. 

7 Ag. H. 
7 Ag. H. 



En. A 
En. A. 
207 Trans 
A. G. 
P. S. 

Loc. Lab. 
C S 

207 TranslB. 
207 Trans. B 
207 Trans. B 



210 Ag. H. 

207 Ag. H. 
210 Ag. H. 
210 Ag. H. 
306 Ag. H. 
319 Ag. H. 
10 H. E. B. 
9 H. E. B. 

208 Ag. H. 
208 Ag. H. 
207 Trans. B. 
308 Sc. B. 



B. 



41 



NON-COLLEGIATE COURSES 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


Ag. N6 


As arranged 




A. E. N51 


Lab. 1-4 M. T. W. Th. 


F. S. 


A. E. N54 


Lab. 1-4 T. W., 9-12 W. S. 


F. S. 


A. E. N60 


Lee. 11, Lab. 1-4 M. T. 


204 O. A. 


A. E. N61 


Lee. 7M.T, Lab. 1-4 Th. F. 


204 0. A. 


A. H. N101 


Lab. 10-12 M. W. F. S. 


Pav. 3 


A. H. N207 


Lab. 3-5 M, 4-6 T. W. F. 


Pav. 3 


A. H. N223 


Lee. 10 T. Th., 9 F. S. 


117 Ag. H. 


A. H. N231 


Lee. 8 M. T. 


117 Ag. H. 


A. H. N232 


Lee. 8 W. Th. 


117 Ag. H. 


A. H. N233 


Lee. 8 F. S. 


117 Ag. H. 


A. H. N234 


Lee. 10 M. F. 


117 Ag. H. 


Bot. NIOOa 


Lee. 11 T. Th. F., 1 T.; Lab. 3-5 M. F. 


306 0. A. 


Bot. N101 


As arranged 




Chem. N67 


Lee. 8 M. T. W. Th.; Lab. 10-12 W. 






Th. 


C. B. 


Eng. N30a 


Rec. 9 


101 C. B. 


Eng. N30b 


Rec. 8 and 9 


101 C. B. 


Eng. N30c 


Rec.8 


101 C. B. 


F. C. Nil 


Lee. 9 M. T. W. Th.; Lab. 1-3 M. T. 






W. Th. 


407 0. A. 


F. M. N51 


Lee. 7 M. T.; Lab. 10-12 T., 2-4 T. F. 






7-9 S. 


308 Ag. H. 


F. M. X52 


Lee. 9; Lab. 1-4 W., 2-5 Th. 


207 Ag. H. 


H. Ec. Nla 


Rec. 8 T. W. Th. F. Lab. 1-4 T. W. 






Th. F. 


211 H. E. B. 


H. Ec. NlOa 


Rec. 11 T. F. Lab. 9-12 M. W. Th. S. 


110 H.E. B. 


H. Ec. N20a 


Rec. 1 W. S. Lab. 1-4 M. T. Th. F. 


100 H. E. B. 


H. Ec. N30a 


Rec. 3T. Th. Lab. 1-3 


Art Studio 


Hort N75b 


Lee. 10 M. W., 9 F. S.; Lab. 3-5 






W. Th. 


306 0. A. 


Math. N31 


Rec. 11 


204 Cen. 


Math. N35a 


Rec. 10'M. T. Th. F. 


204 Cen. 


Math. N35b 


Rec. 7 M. T. Th. F. 


204 Cen. 


Math. N37a 


Rec. 11 daily except Saturday 


204 Cen. 


Math. N37b 


Rec. 7 daily except Saturday 


204 Cen. 


Soils N41 


Lee. 8 M. T. W. Th.; Lab. 3-5 W. Th. 


407 0. A. 


T. I. Nla, b, c 


Lab. 7-10 M. S., 1-4 M. F. 


303 En. A. 


T. I. N2a, b 


Lab. 7-10 and 2-5, or 1-4 T. W. Th. F. 


P. S. 


T. I. N7a, b, c 


Lab. 7-10 and 2-5, or 1-4 T. W. Th. F. 


as 


T. I. EN2 


As arranged 




Zool. Nl 


Rec. 7 M. T. W. Th., Lab. 9-12 M. T. 




Zool. N2 


Rec. 8 M. T. W. Th., Lab. 9-12 F. S. 








12 



COLLEGIATE COURSES 
(Second Half) 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 




Room 


A. E. 61 


Rec. 1 M. W. F., Lab. 2-5 M. W 


F. 


C. S. 


A. E. 79 


Rec 1 M. T. Th. F., Lab. 2-5 M. 


W. 


204 O. A. 


A. E. 77 


Rec. 11 M. T. Th. F., Lab. 2-5 T. 


Th. 


204 O. A. 


A. E. 74 


Rec. 1 W. S. Lab. 2-5 F. S. 




204 O. A. 


A. E. 80 


Lab. 7-10 T. Th. 




205 O. A. 


A. E. 107 


As arranged 






A. J. 28a 


Rec. 8 




19 Ag. H. 


A. H. Ill 


Lee. 9 M. T. Th. F., Lab. 7-9 M. T. Th. 






F. 




109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 112 


Lee. 1 M. T. Th. F., Lab. 10-12 M 


. T. 






Th. F. 




109 Ag. H. 


A. H. 113 


Lee. 2 M. T. Th. F., Lab. 3-5 M. T. 


Th. 






F. 




109Ag.H. 


A. H. 400 


Rec. 1, Lab. 2-5 W. S. 




117 Ag. H. 


A. H. 402 


Rec. 2 T. Th., Lab. 3-5 T. Th. 




117 Ag. H. 


A. H. 434, 500, 505, 








510, 515 


As arranged 






Bac. 31b. 75, 173, 








262 


As arranged 






Chem. 503 


Rec. 11, Lab. 8-10 M. W. F. 




286 C. B. 


Cheni. 504 


Rec. 8 M. T. W. F., Lab. 10-12 




286 C. B. 


Dairy 80, 81, 82, 








143 


As arranged 






Econ. 135, 159, 160 








340, 350, 380 


As arranged 






Eng. 20 


Rec. 2 




13 Cen. 


Eng. 430a 


Rec. 3 




13 Cen. 


F. C. 151 


Rec. 10, Lab. 7-10 T. Th. 




307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 152 


Rec. 2, Lab. 7-10 W. S. 




307 Ag. H. 


F. C. 181, 182, 








281a-b-c, 282 


As arranged 






For. 76, 77 


As arranged 




Summer Camp 


Hort 75a 


Lee. 8 M. W. F. S. , Lab. 2-4 T. Th. S. 


208 Ag. H. 


Hort 365 


Lee. 7 M. T. Th. F., Lab. 2-4 M. W 


.F. 


208 Ag. H. 


Hort, 78, 178, 278, 








378 


As arranged 






Math. 5c 


Rec. 7 and 11 (except Sat.) 




216 Cen. 


Phys. 106B 


Rec. 8 




209 En. H. 


Phys. 202, 203, 204 


Rec. 8 and 1. Lab. 9-12 




207 En. H. 


Psych. 1 


Rec. 11, and 4 M. T. Th. F. 




210 Cen. 


Psych. 20 


Rec. 9, and 3 T. Th. 




210 Cen. 


Soils 151 


Rec. 7. M. W. F. S., Lab. 10-12 M. 


W. 






F.S. 




7 Ag. H. 


Soils 251 


Rec. 8 M. W. F. S., Lab. 1-3 M. W. 


Th. 






F. 




7 Ag. H. 


Soils 252 


Rec. 9 M. W. F. S., Lab. 3-5 M. W. 


Th. 






F. 




7 Ag. H. 


Soils 281, 381, 481, 








571 


As arranged 






T. I. 1 


Lab. 8-11 M. T. Th. F. 




En. A. 


T.I. 2 


Lab. 1-4 M. T. Th. F. 




En. A. 


T. I. 14 


Rec. 1 




207 Trans B. 


T. I. 16 


Rec. 8, Lab. 2-5 




A. G. 


T. I. 18 


Lab. 8-11 




P. S. 


T. I. 23 


Lab. 2-5 




Loc. Lab. 



43 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


T. I. 26 


Lab. 8-11 


C. S. 


T. I. 40 


Rec. 4 


207 Trans. B. 


T. I. 142 


Rec. 11 


207 Trans. B. 


Voc. Ed. 52 


Rec. 1 


307 Ag. H. 


Voc. Ed. 54 


Rec. 10 


208 Ag. H. 


Voc. Ed. 55 


Rec. 8 


307 Ag. H. 


Voc. Ed. 142 


Rec. 11 


207 Trans. B. 


Zool. 380, 






408 


As arranged 





NON-COLLEGIATE COURSES 



Course 


Hour of Recitation 


Room 


Ag. N6 


1-4 M. T. W. Th. F. 




A. H. Nlll 


Lee. 7 M. T. W. Th. 


Pav. 3 


A. H. N260 


Lee. 7 F. S., 1 F., and 2 F. 


109 Ag. H. 


Dairy N17 


Lee. 8; Lab. 9-12 F. S. 


11 D. B. 


F. C. N12 


Lee. 11 M. T. W. Th.; Lab. 1-3 M. T. 






W. Th. 


407 O. A. 


Hort N201 


Rec. 10 


306 O. A. 


Hort. N401 


Lab. 3-5 M. T. W. Th. 


O. H. Lab. 


Soils N42 


9 M. T. Th. F.; Lab. 10-12 F. 8-10 W. 


407 O. A. 


T. I. Nla, b, c 


Lab. 7-10 M. S., 1-4 M. F. 


303 En. A. 


T. I. N2 a, b 


Lab. 7-10 and 2-5, or 1-4 T. W. Th. F. 


P. S. 


T. I. N7 a, b, c 


Lab. 7-10 and 2-5, or 1-4 T. W. Th.F. 


c. s. 


T. I. EN2 


As arranged 




Zool. N2 


Rec. 8 M. T. W. Th., Lab. 9-12 F. S. 




Zool. N4 


Rec. 7 M. T. W. Th., Lab. 9-12 M. T. 





JAN a 1931 



\r • 



M..I • .!& 



-H 



The Country Boy's Greed 




BELIEVE that the country which 
God made is more beautiful than 
the city which man made ; that 
life out of doors and in touch 
with the earth is the natural 
life for man. I helieve that work is 
work wherever we find it, but that work 
with Nature is more inspiring than work 
with the most intricate machinery. I be- 
lieve that the dignity of labor depends not 
on what you do, but on how you do it; 
that opportunity comes to a boy on the 
farm as often as to a boy in the city, that 
life is larger and freer and happier on the 
farm than in the town ; that my success 
depends not upon my location, but upon 
myself — not upon my dreams, but upon 
what I actually do, not upon luck but upon 
pluck. I believe in working when you 
work and in playing when you play and in 
giving and demanding a square deal in 
every act of life. — Edwin 0. Grover. 



THE COLLEGE 

The Iowa State College of Agriculture and Me- 
chanic Arts conducts work in five major lines : 

Agriculture Engineering 

Home Economics Industrial Science 

Veterinary Medicine 

The Graduate College conducts advance research 
and instruction in all these five lines. 

Four-year, five-year, and six-year collegiate 
courses are offered in different divisions of the 
College. Non-collegiate courses are offered in 
agriculture, engineering, and home economics. 
Summer Sessions include graduate, collegiate, and 
non-collegiate work. Short courses are offered in 
the Winter. 

Extension courses are conducted at various 
points throughout the state. 

Research work is conducted in the Agricultural 
and Engineering Experiment Stations and in the 
Veterinary Research Laboratory. 

Special announcements of the different branches 
of the work are supplied, free of charge, on appli- 
cation. 

Address 

THE REGISTRAR, 

Ames, Iowa. 



?4 



'/» 



ft/ty 



J AK$ 






summer' 



Sessioiv 

Iowa State ColleAe 

Ames -1922 & 



1922 SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR 

FIRST TERM 

June 10 and 12, Saturday and Monday — Registration and Classifi- 
cation. 

June 13, Tuesday, 7:00 A.M. — Class Work Begins. 

June 21, Wednesday, 10:20 A. M. — First Summer Session Convoca- 
tion. 

June 21, 22, 23, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday — Examination 
for county uniform certificates. Room 317, Agricultural Hall. 

July 4, Independence Day — Holiday. 

July 17, 22 — Conference on Vocational Agriculture. 

July 21, Friday, 4:00 P. M. — Close of First Term. 

SECOND TERM 

July 21, 22, Friday and Saturday — Registration and Classification. 
July 24, Monday, 7:00 A.M. — Class Work Begins. 
July 26, 27, 28, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday — Examination 
for county uniform certificates. Room 317, Agricultural Hall. 
August 31, Thursday, 4:00P.M. — Close of Second Term. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

OF 

LGRICULTURE and mechanic arts 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



Tffi L 



%% 



ff*'n r 






is. 



TWELFTH ANNUAL 

SUMMER SESSION 

GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

1922 



VOL. XX, NO. 37, FEBRUARY 8, 1922 
AMES, IOWA 

Published weekly by the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic 

Arts, Ames, Iowa. Entered as second-class matter and accepted for mailing 

at special rate of postage provided for in Section 429. P. L. & R. Act, 

August 24, 1912, authorized April 12, 1920. 



IOWA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

D. D. Murphy, President Elkade. 

W. H. Gemmill, Secretary Des Moines 



MEMBERS OF BOARD 

TERMS EXPIRE JULY 1, 1923 

Geo. T. Baker Davenport 

Anna B. Lawther Dubuque 

Willard C. Stuckslager Lisbon 

TERMS EXPIRE JULY 1, 1925 

P. K. Holbrook Onawa 

Chas. R. Brenton Dallas Center 

D. D. Murphy Elkader 

TERMS EXPIRE JULY 1, 1927 

Chas. H. Thomas Creston 

Edw. P. Schoentgen Council Bluffs 

Pauline Llewelling Devitt Oskaloosa 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Faculty Committee — D. D. Murphy, P. K. Holbrook, W. C. Stuckslager, 
Charles H. Thomas, Miss Anna B. Lawther. 

Building and Business Committee — Chas. R. Brenton, D. D. Murphy, Edw. 
P. Schoentgen, Geo. T. Baker, Mrs. Pauline Llewelling Devitt. 






FINANCE COMMITTEE 

W. R. Boyd, Chairman Cedar Rapids 

Thos. Lambert Sabula 

W. H. Gemmill, Secretary Des Moines 



BOARD ON SECONDARY SCHOOL RELATIONS 
John E. Foster, Secretary Des Moines 

AUDITOR AND ACCOUNTANT 
J. W. Bo wdish Des Moines 



2 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

GENERAL OFFICERS 

Raymond Allen Pearson, LL. D President 

Room 104, Central Building. 
Herman Knapp, B. S. A Business Manager and Treasurer 

Room 122, Central Building. 
Orange Howard Cessna, D. D Chaplain 

Room 212, Central Building. 
Thomas Sloss Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Superintendent's Office. 
James F. Edwards, M. D College Physician 

Hospital Building. 

Edward M. Effler Secretary and Auditor 

Gladys M. Rush, B. S Assistant Librarian 

Room 112, Central Building. 
George Piatt Bowdish Purchasing Agent 

Room 124, Central Building. 
James R. Sage, B. A., M. Sc Acting Registrar 

Room 114, Central Building. 

DEANS AND VICE DEANS 

Charles Franklin Curtiss, D. S Dean of the Division of Agriculture 

Room 124, Hall of Agriculture. 
Anson Marston, C. E Dean of the Division of Engineering 

Room 301, Engineering Hall. 
Samuel Walker Beyer, Ph. D...Dean of the Division of Industrial Science 

Room 299, Chemistry Building. 
Charles Henry Stange, D. V. M Dean of the Division of Veterinary 

Room 107, Veterinary Building. Medicine 

Robert Earle Buchanan, Ph. D Dean of the Graduate College 

Room 101, Science Building. 
Maria M. Roberts, B. L Dean of the Junior College 

Room 218, Central Building. 
Spencer Ambrose Beach, M. S...Vice Dean of the Division of Agriculture 

Room 201, Hall of Agriculture. 
Hazel May Harwood, A. B., A. M Dean of Women 

Room 103, Central Building. 
Edna E. Walls, Ph. B., B. S Acting Dean of Home Economics 

Room 106, Home Economics Building. 
Harold Edward Bemis, D. V. M Vice Dean of the Division of 

Room 108, Veterinary Building. Veterinary Medicine 

James R. Sage, B. A., M. Sc Acting Vice Dean of Junior College 

Room 114, Central Building. 

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

Charles Franklin Curtiss, D. Sc Director 

Room 124, Hall of Agriculture. 
William Henry Stevenson, B. S. A Vice Director 

Room 25, Hall of Agriculture. 

ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

Anson Marston, C. E Director 

Room 301, Engineering Hall. 

AGRICULTURAL AND HOME ECONOMICS EXTENSION 

Ralph K. Bliss, B. S. A Director 

Room 29, Morrill Hall. 

ENGINEERING EXTENSION 

Daniel C. Faber, B. S Director 

Room 192, Chemistry Building. 

*Absent on leave. 



SUMMER SESSION FACULTY 

SUMMER SESSION COUNCIL 

Pearson, Raymond Allen, President, 1912. 

B. S. in Agr., Cornell University, 1894 ; M. S. in Agr., 1899 ; LL. D., 
Alfred University, 1909 ; D. of Agr., University of Nebraska, 1917. 

Buchanan, Robert Earle, Acting Director of Summer Session 1922, Dean 
of the Graduate College, Professor of Bacteriology, 1919, 1904. 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1904; M. S., 1906; Ph. D., University of 
Chicago, 1908. 

Curtiss, Charles Franklin, Dean of the Division of Agriculture, Director 
of Agriculture Experiment Station, 1897, 1891. 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1887; M. S. A., 1892; D. S. in Agriculture, 
Michigan Agricultural College, 1907. 

Marston, Anson, Dean of the Division of Engineering, Director of Engi- 
neering Experiment Station, 1892. 

C. E., Cornell University, 1889. 

Beyer, Samuel Walker, Dean of the Division of Industrial Science, Pro- 
fessor of Geology, 1919, 1897. 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1889 ; Ph. D., John Hopkins Univ., 1895. 

Walls, Edna E., Professor and Acting Dean of Home Economics Division, 
1920, 1915. 

Ph. B., Mount Union College, 1908 ; B. S., Columbia University, 1914. 

Stange, Charles Henry, Dean of the Division of Veterinary Medicine, 
Professor of Veterinary Medicine, 1909, 1907. 

D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1907. 

PROFESSORS 

Baldwin, Francis Marsh, Professor of Physiology, 1920, 1917. 

A. B., Clark College, 1906 ; A. M., 1907 ; Ph. D., -University of Illinois, 
1917. 

Beckman, Frederick William, Professor and Head of Agricultural Jour- 
nalism, 1911. 

Ph. B., University of Iowa, 1897. 

Bemis, Harold Edward, Vice Dean of the Division of Veterinary Medi- 
cine, Professor and Head of Veterinary Surgery, 1915, 1908. 
D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1908. 

Benbrook, Edward Antony, Professor and Head of Veterinary Pathology, 
1919, 1918. 

V. M. D., University of Pennsylvania, 1914. 
Bergman, Henry Dale, Professor and Head of Veterinary Physiology and 
Pharmacology, 1916, 1910. 

D. V. M., Iowa State College, 1910. 

Beyer, Samuel Walker, Dean of the Division of Industrial Science, Pro- 
fessor and Head of Geology, 1919, 1897. 

B. 8., low;. State College, L889 ; Ph. D., John Hopkins University, 1895 

Bittenbender, Harry Artley, Professor and Head of Poultry Husbandry 
1017, 1910. 
i'.. 8. in A. Jr., [owa State College, 1911. 

Brandt, Iva L., Professor and Head of Household Art, 1920, 1912. 
j',. s. in Home Economics, Iowa stale College, 1905. 



Brindley, John Edwin, Professor and Head of Economic Science, 1913, 
1907. 

B. L., University of Wisconsin, 1902 ; A. M., 1906 , Vh. D., University 
of Iowa, 1911. 

Brown, Percy Edgar, Professor and Acting Head of Soils, 1921, 1910. 
B. Sc, Rutgers College, 1906; A. M., 1909, Ph. D., 1!)]1 

Busse, Florence E., Professor and Head of Household Science, 1919, 1915. 

A. B., Northwestern University, 1908 ; M. A., Columbia University, 1918. 

i. Orange Howard, Professor and Head of History and Psychology, 
1900. 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1872 ; B. D., Garrett Biblical Institute, 1885 ; 
D. D., 1900 ; A. M., Cornell College, 1901. 

Cunningham, J. C, Professor of Horticulture and Botany, and Super- 
visor of Agriculture (Non-Collegiate), 1918, 1911. 
B. S., Kansas State College, 1905. 

Davidson, Jay Brownlee, Professor and Head of Agricultural Engineer- 
ing, 1907, 1905. 

B. S., M. E., University of Nebraska, 1904; A. E., 1914. 

De Vries, Louis, Professor and Head of Modern Languages, 1921, 1919, 
1913. 

A. B., Central Wesleyan College, 1907 ; A. M., Northwestern University, 
1908 ; Ph. D., 1918. 

Duckering, William E., Professor of Engineering Problems, 1919. 

A. B., University of Washington, 1903 ; B. S. in C. E.. 1909 ; C. E., 1915. 

Fish, Fred Allan, Professor and Head of Electrical Engineering, 1907, 
1905. 

M. E. in E. E., Ohio State University, 189 8. 

Fuller, Almon Homer, Professor and Head of Civil Engineering, 1920. 

C. E., Lafayette College, 1897; M. S., 1900; M. C. E., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1898. 

Hammer, Bernard Wernick, Professor of Dairy Bacteriology, 1916, 1911. 

B. S. A., University of Wisconsin, 1908 ; Ph. D., University of Chicago, 
1920. 

Hansen, Joanna M., Professor and Head of Applied Art, 1920, 1915. 

Diploma Pratt Institute, 1905 ; B. A., Iowa State Teachers College, 1917. 

Hurd, Julia L., Professor and Supervisor of Non-Collegiate Home Eco- 
nomics, 1921, 1920. 

B. A., Iowa State Teachers College, 1912 ; M. A., Columbia University, 
1920. 

Kildee, Henry Herbert, Professor and Head of Animal Husbandry, 1918, 
1908. 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1908; M. S., Iowa State College. 1917. 

Kimball, Allen Holmes, Professor and Head of Architectural Engineer- 
ing, 1915. 1914. 

B. L., University of California, 1910 ; B. S., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1911 ; M. S., 1912. 

LaGrange, William F., Professor of Animal Husbandry, 1920, 1917. 

B. S. in Animal Husbandry, Iowa State College, 1917. 

McCandlish, Andrew C, Professor of Dairy Husbandry, 1921, 1915. 

X. B. D., Kilmarnock, 1911; B. S., Glasgow, 1912; C. D. D., 1912; 

C. D. A., 1912 ; N. D. A., Leeds, Scotland, 1912 ; M. S., Iowa State Col- 
lege, 1915. 

MacDonald, Gilmour Beyers, Professor of Forestry, 1913, 1910. 
B. S. F., University of Nebraska, 1907 ; M. F., 1914. 

MacRae, Tolbert, Professor and Head of Music, 1921, 1920. 
Martin, John Nathan, Professor of Plant Morphology and Cytology, 
1917, 1911. 

A. B., Indiana University 1907 ; Ph. D., University of Chicago, 1913. 



Aleeker, Warren H., Professor and Head of Mechanical Engineering, 
1907, 1891. 

M. E., Cornell University, 1891. 

Melhus, Irving E., Professor of Plant Pathology, 1917, 1916. 

B. Sc., Iowa State College, 1906 ; Ph. D., University of Wisconsin. 1911. 

Miller, Elizabeth W., Professor of Home Economics, 1921, 1918. 
Ph. B., University of Chicago, 1914; M. A., 1915; Ph. D., 1921. 

Mortensen, Martin, Professor and Head of Dairying, 1909. 
B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1909. 

Murphey, Howard Sylvester, Professor and Head of Veterinary Anatomy 
and Histology, 1913, 1909. 

D. V. M., Ohio State University, 1908. 

Noble, Alvin Buell, Professor and Head of English, 1898. 
B. Ph., State University of Iowa, 1887. 

Nourse, Edwin Griswold, Professor of Agricultural Economics, 1918. 

A. B., Cornell University, 1906 ; Ph. D., University of Chicago, 1915. 

Pammel, Louis Hermann, Professor and Head of Botany, 1889. 

B. Agr., University of Wisconsin, 1885 ; M. S., 1889 ; Ph. D., Washington 
University, St. Louis, 1898. 

Richey, Harry Wyatt, Professor of Pomology, 1921, 1914. 
B. Sc. A., University of Nebraska, 1914. 

Roberts, Maria M., Dean of the Junior College, Professor of Mathematics 
1921, 1891. 

B. L., Iowa State College, 1890. 

Schmidt, Louis Bernard, Professor of History, 1919, 1906. 
Ph. B., Cornell College, 1901; A. M., 1906. 

Shane, Adolph, Professor of Trades and Industries, 1920, 1904. 

B. S. in E. E., University of Nebraska, 1901 ; E. E., Iowa State Col- 
lege, 1908. 

Shattuck, Frederica Van Trice, Professor and Head of Public Speaking, 
1916, 1907. 

B. A., University of Wisconsin, 1905. 

Shearer, Phineas Stevens, Professor of Animal Husbandry, 1919, 1912. 
B. S. in A. H., Iowa State College, 1912. 

Smith, Edwin Raymond, Professor and Head of Mathematics, 1921. 

A. B., University of Illinois, 1905 ; A. M., University of Wisconsin, 1908; 
Ph. D., University of Munich, 1911. 

Sweeney, Orland Russell, Professor and Head of Chemical Engineering, 
1920. 

Sc. B. in Chem. E., Ohio State University, 1909; M. A., 1910; Ph. D., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1916. 

Von Tungeln, George Henry, Professor of Rural Sociology, 1914, 1913. 
Ph. B., Central Wesleyan College, 1909 ; M. A., Northwestern Univer- 
sity, 1910. 

Wilkinson, John Anderson, Professor of Physical and Analytical Chem- 
istry, 1919, 1913. 

B. Sc, Ohio State University, 1903 ; Ph. D., Cornell University, 1909. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Allen, Edward Switzer, Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1921. 
A. I',., Harvard University, 1909; A. M., 1910; Ph. D., 1914. 

Ayres, Quincy Claude, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering, 
1920. 

P. S., University of Mississippi, 1912; B. E., 1912; C. E., 1920. 

Bailey, N. Beth, Associate Professor of Household Science, 1919. 
]',. S., Stout Institute, 1918. 



Bakke, Arthur Lawrence, Associate Professor of Plant Physiology, 1917, 
1910. 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1909; M. S., 1911; Ph. D., University of Chi- 
cago, 1917. 

Brown, Frank Emerson, Associate Professor of Chemistry, 1918, 1917. 

A. B., Kansas State Normal School; S. B., University of Chicago, 1913; 
Ph. D., 1919. 

Caine, Alfred B., Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry, 1919, 1917. 

B. S., Utah Agricultural College, 1914 ; M. S., Iowa State College, 1917. 

Colpitts, Julia Trueman, Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1913, 1900. 

A. B., Mount Allison University, Canada, 1899 ; A. M., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1900. 

Cook, Rosamond C, Associate Professor of Teacher Training, 1921, 1918. 
Fitchburg State Normal, 1910; Columbia University, 1914-1915. 

Cooper, Esther L., Associate Professor of English, 1916, 1909. 
Ph. B., State University of Iowa, 1903. 

Cox, Paul Ernest, Associate Professor and Acting Head, 1921, of Ceramic 
Engineering, 1920. 

B. S., in Ceramics, Alfred University, 1905. 

Cranor, Katherine Taylor, Associate Professor of Household Art, 1921. 
B. S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1914; A. M., 1918; Diploma 
Academie de Coupe, France, 1914. 

Eastman, Eric Eyre, Associate Professor of Soils, 1917, 1913. 
B. S., Iowa State College, 1913 ; M. S. ( 1915. 

Evans, John Ellis, Associate Professor of Psychology, 1921. 

A. B., Indiana University, 1910; M. A., 1911; Ph. D., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1916. 

Fenton, Frederick Charles, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering, 1920, 1914. 

B. S. in A. E., Iowa State College, 1914. 

Fulmer, Ellis Ingham, Associate Professor of Chemistry, 1920, 1919. 

B. A., Nebraska Wesleyan University, 1912; M. A., University of 
Nebraska, 1913; Ph. D., University of Toronto, 1919. 

Galpin, Sidney Longman, Associate Professor of Geology, 1919, 1913. 

A. B., Western Reserve University, 1907 ; A. M., Cornell University, 
1910; Ph. D., 1912. 

Gilman, Henry, Associate Professor of Chemistry, 1920, 1919. 
S. B., Harvard University, 1915; M. A., 1917; Ph. D., 1918. 

Goss, Emory S., Associate Professor of Dairying, 1919. 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1915 ; M. S., 1916. 

Guard, Willard F., Associate Professor of Veterinary Surgery, 1916, 1914. 
D. V. M., Ohio State University, 1912. 

Harter, William Lewis, Associate Professor of Economic Science, 1919. 
1917. 

A. B., McPherson College, Kansas, 1904; M. S. in Farm Management, 
Iowa State College, 1918. 

Hayes, Anson, Associate Professor of Chemistry, 1920, 1915. 

B. S., Drake University, 1909 ; M. S., Iowa State College, 1916 ; Ph. D., 
University of Chicago, 1921. 

Helser, Maurice D., Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry, 1919, 1916. 
B. S. A., Ohio State University, 1914; M. S. in A. H., Iowa State Col- 
lege, 1916. 

Iverson, Carrol A., Associate Professor of Dairying, 1919. 

B. S. in Dairying, South Dakota State College, 1915 ; M. S., Iowa State 
College, 1917. 

Johnson, David Russell, Associate Professor of Soils, 1920. 

B. S. A., Purdue University, 1916 ; M. S., Iowa State College, 1917. 
Johnson, Harlan Woodbridge, Associate Professor of Soils, 1920, 1914. 

B. S. in Agron., Iowa State College, 1914 ; M. S., 1915. 



Knappenberger, Lillis, Associate Professor of Household Art, 1920, 1917. 
Ph. B., University of Chicago, 1915. 

Lancelot, W. H., Associate Professor and Acting Head of Vocational 
Education, 1920, 1918. 

B. S., in Ag. Ed., Iowa State College, 1919. 

Lowe, Belle, Associate Professor of Household Science, 1921, 1918. 
Ph. B., University of Chicago, 1917. 

Lynn, Joseph Victor, Associate Professor of Vocational Education, 1920. 
B. S., Stout Institute, 1918. 

Mervine, Ernest Muchmore, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering, 1915, 1912. 

M. E., Lehigh University, 1909. 

Miller, Cora B., Associate Professor of Vocational Education, 1919, 1916. 
B. S., Beloit College, 1899. 

Morbeck, George Chester, Associate Professor of Forestry, 1914, 1912. 
B. S. in Forestry, Michigan Agricultural College, 1904 ; M. F., 1915. 

Nelson, Victor Emanuel, Associate Professor of Physiological Chem- 
istry, 1920, 1919. 

B. S., University of Wisconsin, 1912 ; M. S., 1914. 

Paddock, Floyd B., Associate Professor of Apiculture, 1919. 

B. S., Colorado Agricultural College, 1909 ; M. S., Ohio State University, 
1911. 

Plagge, Herbert John, Associate Professor of Physics, 1918, 1909. 

B. S., Northwestern University, 1906 ; M. A., University of Wisconsin, 
1910. 

Stephenson, Richard S., Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry, 1919. 
B. S., Iowa State College, 1915 ; M. S., 1916. 

Stiles, Harold, Associate Professor of Physics, 1915, 1914. 

A. B., Kenyon College, 1896; A. M., Harvard University, 1904; Ph. D., 
Cornell University, 1909. 

Tappan, Anna Helen, Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1917, 1914. 
A. B., Western College, 1909 ; A. M., Cornell University, 1912 ; Ph. D., 
Cornell University, 1914. 

Thurber, John Melvin, Associate Professor of English, 1921. 

A. B., Colgate, 1915. 

Turner, Arthur William, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineer- 
ing, 1921, 1919. 

B. S. in A. E., Iowa State College, 1917. 

Vance, Thomas Franklin, Associate Professor of Psychology, 1916, 191-1 . 

A. B., Coe College, 1909; M. A., University of Iowa, 1911; Ph. D., 1913. 

Vifquain, R. M., Associate Professor of Farm Crops and Soils, 1920. 

B. A., Nebraska Wesleyan University, 1915 ; M. A., University of Mis- 
souri, 1917. 

Volz, Emil Conrad, Associate Professor of Horticulture, 1921, 1914. 

B. S., Michigan Agricultural College, 1914 ; M. S. A., Cornell University, 
1918. 

Weaver, Earl, Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry, 1919. 

B. S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1913 ; M. S., Iowa 
State College, 1917. 

Wentz, John Budd, Associate Professor and Acting Head of Farm Crops, 
1921. 

B. S. A., North Dakota Agricultural College, 1913 ; M. S., Cornell, 1916. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Anderson, Arthur Lawrence, Animal Husbandry, 1920. 
B. 8., University of Minnesota, 1916. 

Arville, Mrs. Daisy Alison, Modern Languages, 1919, 1908. 
A. B., University of Kansas, 1899. 

8 






Atkinson, John Hampton, English, 1914. 

Ph. B., Ohio University, 1897 ; A. M.. Columbia University, 1901. 

Benner, Claude L., Economic Science, 1921. 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1919; A. M.. 1920. 

Bottorf, R. S., Animal Husbandry, 1920. 

B. S., Iowa State College, 1919. 

Borucki, Stanley, Public Speaking, 1921, 1919. 
A. B., University of Michigan, 1917. 

Converse, Blair, Agricultural Journalism, 1919. 

A. B., Earlham College, 1914; M. A., University of Wisconsin, 1918. 

Daniells, Marian Elizabeth, Mathematics, 1919, 1914. 

A. B., Kalamazoo College, 1908 ; A. B., University of Chicago, 1908 ; 
M. S., Iowa State College, 1919. 

Dorchester, Charles S., Farm Crops, 1916, 1913. 

B. S. in Agron., Iowa State College, 1913. 

Early, James Marshall, Trades and Industries, 1919. 

Eldredge, John C, Farm Crops, 1921. 

B. S. in Agr., Iowa State College, 1915. 

Emerson, Paul, Soils, 1919. 

B. S. in Ag., Delaware State College, 1914 ; M. S. in Ag., 1915 ; Ph. D., 
Iowa State College, 1917. 

Erickson, Elmer T., Farm Crops and Soils, 1920. 
B. S. in Agr., Iowa State College, 1920. 

Firkins, Bruce Judson, Soils, 1919, 1918. 

B. S. A., Iowa State College, 1917 ; M. S. A., 1918. 

Gaessler, Myrtle Bihl, Physical Education, 1920, 1918. 
American College of Physical Education, 1915. 

Gilman, Joseph C, Botany, 1921, 1918. 

B. A., University of Wisconsin, 1912 ; M. S., 1914 ; Ph. D., Washington 
University, 1915. 

Haber, E. S., Botany and Horticulture, 1920. 
B. S. ( Ohio State University, 1918. 

Hamlin, Herbert M., Vocational Education, 1920. 
B. S. in Agr. Ed., Iowa State College, 1916. 

Hawthorne, Horace Boies, Economic Science, 1921. 
B. S., Iowa State College, 1914; M. S., 1915. 

Herr, Gertrude A., Mathematics, 1919, 1913. 
B. S., Iowa State College, 1907; M. S., 1917. 

Hugg, John, Mechanical Engineering, 1913, 1909. 
B. M. E., Iowa State College, 1909. 

Jeffers, Dwight S., Forestry, 1921. 
M. F., Yale University, 1911. 

Kiefer, Earl Chester, Mathematics, 1919. 

B. S. in Engr.. Michigan Agricultural College, 1913 ; M. S., University 
of Michigan, 1919. 

McFarland, R. L., Auto Mechanics, 1918. 

Miller, Frank Clifford, Mechanical Engineering, 1919. 
B. S., James Milliken University. 1909. 

Murphy, Eda Lord, Household Science, 1921, 1919. 

Diploma, Ferry Hall, 1900 ; Diploma, Stout Institute, 1912. 

Riemenschneider, Alma, Household Science, 1920. 
B. S. in H. Ec, Iowa State College, 1916. 

Stephens, Marie, Household Art, 1920. 

B. S. in H. Ec, Iowa State College, 1911. 

Ward, Willard B., Horticulture, 1920, 1919. 
B. S., Purdue University, 1917. 



INSTRUCTORS 

Anderson, Robert G., B. S Animal Husbandry, 1920 

Arduser, L. P., B. S. in M. E Trades and Industries, 1920 

Barr, Maude, A. B., M. A English, 1920 

Bradley, Howard, B. A Public Speaking, 1921 

Bressman, Earl N., B. S Farm Crops, 1920 

Burge, Chas. A., B. S Animal Husbandry, 1921 

Clark, Clarissa May, B. Sc Bacteriology, 1917 

Cochran, R. L., B. S Animal Husbandry, 1920 

Comfort, Sarah C, A. B English, 1920 

Cook, James Neel, B. S Civil Engineering, 1920 

Daubert, C. E Physical Training, 1920 

Elder, W. T., B. S Trades and Industries, 1920 

Ernsberger, Iva, A. B., A. M Mathematics, 1919 

Farnum, Fay, B. S., M. A Mathematics, 1915 

Farquharson, R. H Trades and Industries, 1921 

Fleming, Mabel A., B. S English, 1912 

Eotsch, Paul L., B. S Poultry Husbandry, 1921 

Gardner, Marion B Applied Art, 1920 

Gunder, Virgil Trades and Industries, 1920 

Hertz, Henry F Agricultural Engineering, 1915 

Howell, H. E Trades and Industries, 1920 

Ingersoll, Blanche, B. S Household Science, 1920, 1915 

Jessup, John G., B. S Apiculture, 1921 

Knappenberger, Nelle, Ph. B Household Art, 1919 

Lee, S. B., A. B., A. M Soils, 1921 

Maitland, Andrew Mechanical Engineering, 1920 

Murphy, Agnes, B. A Physical Culture, 1919 

Neilson, W. A Mechanical Engineering, 1922 

Nethken, Harley, B. S. in E. E Trades and Industries, 1920 

Parker, Ralph Langley, B. S., Sc. M.. Physiology, 1919 

Puth, L. E ^Trades and Industries, 1919 

Parsons, Winifred, A. B Public Speaking, 1921 

Ressler, Ivan Lincoln, A. B,, M. S. Zoology, 1919 

Riedesel, R. C, B. M. E Trades and Industries, 1912 

Rynerson, H. Z Agricultural Engineering, 1920 

Smith, Helen, A. B., M. S Mathematics. 1907 

Spangler, E. M Mechanical Engineering, 1905, 1904 

Storms, Lillian Boynton, B. S., M. Sc.Chemistry, 1917 

Vernon, W. H., B. S Animal Husbandry, 1920 

Wilson, Ruth, Ph. B Household Art, 1919 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

Anderegg, L. T Chemistry 

I .arrows, J. A Chemistry 

Chapman, O. W Chemistry 

Dueker, W. W Chemistry 

Dunlap, T. E Chemistry 

Fishel, W. P Chemistry 

Hill, H. A Chemistry 

Johnson, B. L Chemistry 

Motley, E. T Chemistry 

Saunders, Chas. W Chemistry 

Wright, H. W Chemistry 

10 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Summer Session work was offered by the Iowa State College for 
the first time in 1911. In that summer a short course extending 
over two weeks was attended by about fifty superintendents and 
high school teachers of the state. In 1912 the Summer Session was 
extended to six weeks, and had a total enrollment of 128 students. 
Since that time the interest in Agriculture and Industrial subjects 
has increased tremendously, not only in this state, but throughout 
the United States. At the present time agriculture is taught in every 
state, and in most states is a required subject. 

In response to the increased demand, the Summer Session has 
been expanded to two terms of six weeks each, and the work of 
these two terms made the equivalent of that offered in other quar- 
ters of the college year. In recent years not only teachers but many 
others have been attracted by the opportunities of the Summer Ses- 
sion. In 1921 the attendance was 723 for the first term and 365 
for the second term. Of these a considerable proportion were teach- 
ers, but many were regular college students. 

SCOPE AND PURPOSE OF THE SUMMER SESSION 

The college year is divided into four approximately equal periods 
of eleven to twelve weeks each. These are termed the Fall, Winter, 
and Spring quarters, and the Summer Session (or Summer Quarter). 
For convenience of students the Summer Session is divided into 
two terms of six weeks each. Inasmuch as it is desirable to have 
each term of the Summer Session stand as a unit, subjects taught 
during a term of six weeks have twice as many class and laboratory 
periods per week as do the same subjects taught during the Fall, 
Winter, or Spring Quarters. The student furthermore carries only 
one-half the number of subjects. This intensive application to a 
small number of subjects has proved very satisfactory. 



THE FACULTY 



The instruction in the Summer Session is given by a corps of 
about 175 teachers belonging to the regular staff. The subjects 
taught in the Summer Session are given by the same specialists that 
teach them in the other quarters of the college year. Practically 
all of the heads of departments, and most of those of professorial 
rank, are in residence during one of the summer terms. The op- 
portunities for contact with leading educators in their respective 
fields are fully as great during the Summer Session as during the 
remainder of the year. 



11 



OPPORTUNITIES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDY 

Work is offered to undergraduate students during the Summer 
Session in most of the departments of the institution. For detailed 
information as to subjects see page 22. The opportunity to secure 
this work should appeal to men and women of the following groups: 

Regular students. Students in residence during other quarters 
of the college year who have become "irregular" because of insuffi- 
cient preparation for entering technical courses of study at the 
college, or because they have entered college in some quarter other 
than the Fall, will be enabled to correct their deficiencies and "catch 
up" in their work. Students who expect to enter a technical course 
of study in the Fall Quarter, particularly Engineering and Industrial 
Science, will frequently find it advantageous to attend a term of the 
preceding Summer Session in order to take such pretechnical sub- 
jects as may be required of them. 

A considerable number of regular students find it possible to 
shorten materially the length of their college courses or to lighten 
work of the other quarters when necessary. 

Students who plan to teach will find in the Summer Session an 
excellent opportunity to complete the necessary work in Psychology 
and in Vocational Education required by law. 

Teachers, principals and supervisors who have not completed a 
college course leading to a Bachelor's Degree and who are particu- 
larly interested in Agricultural Education, Home Economics Edu- 
cation, or education in Trades and Industries, and in the related 
sciences and technical subjects will be able to advance themselves 
toward such degree. 

Any Mature Individual who satisfies the department concerned as 
to his ability to carry the work desired will be admitted without 
examination. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR GRADUATE STUDY 

For details relative to degrees and subjects see page 18. An in- 
creasingly large proportion of the Summer Session students have 
been those who already have a baccalaureate degree and are inter- 
ested in advanced or graduate work. Among those who find excep- 
tional opportunity to advance themselves toward a Master's or a 
Doctor's degree are the following: 

Teachers and supervisors of Agriculture, Home Economics, Man- 
ual Training and Trades and Industries in the public schools, par- 
ticularly high schools and consolidated schools, may pursue advanced 
courses relating to their particular fields. Those who are graduates 
in technical courses will usually be interested in securing an ad- 
vanced degree by pursuing major work in some department in 
Agriculture, Engineering, Home Economics, etc., with minor work 
in Vocational Education. Those who are graduates of non-technical 
institutions will usually be interested in carrying major work in 
Vocational Education and minor work in Agriculture, Home Econom- 
ics or Trades and Industries. 

Superintendents, principals and supervisors. The large number 
of superintendents and principals who have been enrolled in the 
Summer Session in the past indicates clearly that it is serving them 
to good advantage, and meeting a special need for getting acquainted 
with the newer subjects of Agriculture, and Trades and Industries, 
as well as offering courses in Vocational Education. An examina- 

12 



tion of the Iowa Directory indicates that Agriculture is taught in 
the high schools of the state by the superintendents more often than 
by any other single group. The Summer Session gives such super- 
intendents and principals an opportunity to secure work of a high 
character under regular college instruction and under favorable 
conditions. Elementary and advanced courses are offered in the 
present session in soils, farm crops, animal husbandry, dairying, 
agricultural engineering, and horticulture, and in the related sub- 
jects of rural sociology, agricultural economics, agricultural educa- 
tion, botany, bacteriology, etc. 

Teachers of the sciences. Excellent opportunities will be offered 
those who wish to pursue advanced courses in the biological, mathe- 
matical and physical sciences. 

Regular graduate students. Many of the graduate students of 
the regular college year find conditions particularly advantageous 
during the Summer Session to continue their graduate work. Many 
research problems can be handled most satisfactory during this 
period. 

Teachers and investigators in technical schools. Particular at- 
tention should be called to several fields in which special emphasis 
will be placed during the Summer Session upon graduate instruc- 
tion. These include in the department of Animal Husbandry the 
subjects of meats and experimental methods; in the department of 
Civil Engineering the subject of highway engineering and highway 
research; in the department of Agricultural Engineering the sub- 
ject of research methods; and in the departments in Home Econom- 
ics the subjects of foods, nutrition, household art and administration. 



VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

The rapid extension of the teaching of vocational subjects in the 
public schools is a direct result of the demands of democracy for a 
type of education which functions in daily life. 

The Iowa State College has been authorized as the one institution 
of the state to train teachers of vocational agriculture, and federal 
funds are made available under the Smith-Hughes Vocational Law 
for the support of such training. 

The Iowa State College has also been approved by the State and 
Federal Vocational Board for the training of teachers of Home 
Economics and Trades and Industries. 

This means that the Iowa State College has new obligations for 
the training of teachers under the Smith-Hughes Law in addition 
to former obligations imposed by the Nelson Amendment to the 
Morrill Act. This responsibility it will endeavor to meet fully. 

The program of industrial and vocational work, combined with 
the related science and education that are offered at Iowa State 
College, is large enough to appeal to any progressive school man or 
woman. The superintendent needs an acquaintance with such sub- 
jects in order to advise students and in order to have the proper 
high school principal needs especially to be familiar with such sub- 
jects in order to advise students and in order to have the proper 
basis for vocational guidance and direction. The teachers of the 
vocational subjects are of course interested. Teachers of subjects 
that are not vocational, however, are showing more and more inter- 
est in such subjects because they realize the desirability of proper 



13 



correlation of studies, and the opportunities for motivating the 
older type of school work through articulation with the industrial 
and vocational work. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR NON-COLLEGIATE STUDY 

The non-collegiate courses in Agriculture are offered to meet the 
demands of young men and young women who may not have had 
the advantages of high school training and who wish to obtain 
preparation for practical agricultural work. 

Study of farm plants and farm animals forms the basis of most 
of the work. Flocks and herds of most of the leading breeds of 
farm animals are available for careful study. Fields of the various 
grains and grasses are found on the College farm. Gardens and 
orchards, greenhouses and nurseries, storage caves and storage 
houses which are found on the College grounds give the student 
opportunity to study problems first hand. The meat laboratory 
affords practice in the cutting, curing, and preparation of farm 
meats. The commercial creamery operated by the College gives 
the student opportunity for study and practice. 

The non-collegiate courses in Trades and Industries are for those 
who wish to prepare themselves for industrial positions througn 
practical and intensive courses of training. These are not engineer- 
ing courses nor are they intended to train men for the engineering 
profession. Their main purpose is to make available for earnest, 
enthusiastic young men of mature habits, a training which will help 
them to increase their earning capacity and prepare them for re- 
sponsible positions with the industries. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

(For admission to Graduate Courses see page 18.) 

(For requirements for Non-Collegiate Courses, see page 41.) 

The entrance requirements for work in the Summer Sessions do 
not differ from those of the remainder of the college year. 

The undergraduate courses of instruction are open to those who 
belong to the following groups: 

a. Graduates of approved high schools or those who have passed 
the entrance examinations. See (A) below. 

b. Students presenting advanced standing from other institu- 
tions of higher learning. See (B) below. 

c. Mature individuals who are able to profit by the instruction 
given, but who are not candidates for a degree. These are 
admitted as unclassified students. 

(A) A graduate of a public four-year high school in Iowa, who 
presents fifteen units of work, will be admitted without examination 
to such collegiate work as he is prepared to pursue, upon presenting 
a certificate signed by the Superintendent or the Principal, specify- 
ing the branches of study and credits included within his high school 
course of study. A graduate of any private four-year high school, 
seminary, or academy approved by the Board on Secondary School 
Relations will be admitted on the same basis. Applicants for ad- 
mission to all collegiate courses should be at least sixteen years 
of age. 

II a high school graduate does not meet present admission require- 
ments to the course he desires to pursue the deficiency must be 

14 



removed by studies taken at the College. Credit earned in removing 
such deficiencies will not be applied toward college graduation in the 
specific course chosen. 

Official high school records should be filed with the Registrar by 
June first, if possible, in order to avoid delays when registering. For 
further information concerning the requirements for admission write 
to the Registrar for the special bulletin on "Admission and Courses 
of Instruction." 

(B) Students of other colleges will be admitted to advanced 
standing in this College under the following conditions: 

First, they must present a letter of honorable dismissal. 

Second, the entrance requirements to this College must be fully 
satisfied. 

Third, it is required that all credits from other colleges be sent 
by the proper officers of such institution, duly certified, to the 
Registrar of this College; such certificates to include number of 
weeks the student has pursued the studies in question and the 
number of hours' credit received in each quarter or semester, as 
well as the portion of the subject covered. 

CREDITS 

The credits granted for the subjects completed in the Summer 
Session are the same as are granted during other quarters. A credit 
is granted for the completion of one hour per week of class work 
with necessary preparation, or of one three-hour laboratory period 
for twelve weeks, or twice this number for a term of six weeks. 

Residence Requirement. For graduate students attendance upon 
four summer terms of six weeks is considered the equivalent of one 
year at the College. 

CERTIFICATES 

The State Board of Educational Examiners will grant five-year 
first-grade state certificates to graduates of the Iowa State College, 
or other approved colleges, who have completed (a) nine quarter- 
hours of psychology, and (b) twenty-one hours of education. The 
courses offered in the Summer Session enable students to meet these 
requirements. 

TEACHERS' EXAMINATIONS 

The State Teachers' examination for June and July will be held 
at the College during the Summer Session for the convenience of 
the teachers in attendance. One expecting to take an examination 
at the College should bring with him a statement from the county 
superintendent, together with the county superintendent's receipt 
showing payment of fee, which will admit to the examination. Where 
such fee has not been previously paid it will be collected and for- 
warded to the county superintendent. 

THE APPOINTMENT COMMITTEE 

In order to serve better the schools of the state, the faculty has 
provided an Appointment Committee, the duties of which are to 
assist the students of the College who desire to enter educational 
work, in finding positions for which they are best fitted, and to aid 

15 



school officials in finding the teachers, principals, supervisors, and 
superintendents best prepared for the positions to be filled. Stu- 
dents of the Summer Session who intend to teach or wish to better 
their positions may register with this committee. Blanks provided 
for that purpose may be secured by calling at the office of the 
Department of Vocational Education, Room 318, Agricultural Hall. 
No fee is charged for the service of this committee. 

CHAPEL 

A chapel service is held at 10:20 a. m., Wednesday of each week, 
and all students are expected to attend. This is more or less in the 
nature of a convocation as well as a chapel service, and furnishes 
opportunity for announcements or for brief remarks upon subjects 
of immediate interest. 

Each Sunday evening vesper services are held from 6:15 to 6:4;!) 
at the campanile when the weather is favorable. In case of in- 
clement weather, the meeting is held in Agricultural Assembly. 

RECREATION 

While the primary object of the Summer Session is work and 
study, yet these will be facilitated by a sufficient amount of recre- 
ation. Students are urged to effect organization and to arrange for 
tournaments in tennis, baseball, track or indoor work. The Com- 
mittee on Games and Recreation will encourage and help in organiz- 
ing the details of this work. The swimming pool in the Men's Gym- 
nasium will be open daily for men each afternoon. 

Special Features. One feature of the Summer Session which is 
particularly worth while is the opportunity to hear educators of 
national reputation. The policy of selecting a limited number of 
men whose addresses no one can afford to miss will be continued this 
year. These lectures for the most part are scheduled for the 
evening; occasionally, however, at 5:00 o'clock. 

LIBRARY 

The various libraries are open for the use of Summer Session 
students. 

HOSPITAL 

The college hospital and dispensary will be open throughout the 
summer session. 

EQUIPMENT 

The equipment of the Iowa State College for work in agriculture, 
home economics, trades and industries, manual training, and related 
subjects is in keeping with the wealth and resources of the state. 
In many respects, the Summer Session is the best season of the 
year for studying agriculture, and the regular college instructors 
in charge of the work use freely the resources of the College and 
the experiment stations. 

FEES 
The incidental fee for each half of the Session is $5.00. The fee 
for less than the full time is $1.00 a week, with $2.00 as a mini- 
mum; or $1.00 per credit hour for college credit work, with $2.00 
as a minimum. Laboratory fees are indicated in connection with 
the descriptions of the courses. 

16 



EXPENSES 

Expenses will vary with the individual. For each half the ex- 
penses need not exceed $75.00 or $80.00 in addition to car fare. 
This makes provision for tuition, room and board for six weeks, 
books, laundry, and other incidentals. 

Women will arrange for rooms through the regular College com- 
mittee of which the Dean of Women is chairman. The College 
dormitories will be open for women students for board and room 
and all women students will be assigned to dormitories. Mattresses 
only are furnished for the cots. The student should bring a pillow, 
sheets, pillow cases, and an extra blanket. 

Rooms for men will be available in private homes and rooming 
houses about the campus. Rooming arrangements for men will be 
in charge of the Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. The Cafeteria in 
Alumni Hall will be open during the entire Summer Session. 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 

Although students coining for the short Summer Session are ad- 
vised not to seek employment, but to give their full time to school 
work, there are usually some summer calls for help. Students may 
learn of these calls through the Secretary of the Y. W. C. A. 

LOCATION 

Ames is almost at the geographical center of the state of Iowa, 
on the main line of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. It is 
about thirty-five miles north of Des Moines, with which it is con- 
nected by a branch line of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad and 
by the Fort Dodge, Des Moines and Southern (interurban) running 
from Fort Dodge and Rockwell City to Des Moines. A branch of the 
Chicago & Northwestern from Ames penetrates the northern part 
of the state. Ames is proverbially a clean town. 

CONFERENCES 

Conference of Teachers of Agriculture. Professor W. H. Bender, 
State Director of Vocational Education, has fixed the week of July 
17 to 22, as the date for the Conference of Teachers of Vocational 
Agriculture. In addition to special work by Professor Bender and 
his assistants, specialists in various lines from the College, as well 
as outside men, will participate in the conference. This conference 
should be of interest, not only to present and prospective teacher* 
of vocational agriculture, but also to present teachers of general 
agriculture and to principals and superintendents who desire to get 
in a short space of time a reasonably adequate notion of the plans 
for vocational work in agriculture. 



17 



GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 

The Summer Session offers an exceptional opportunity to the 
qualified student who plans to pursue graduate work at Iowa State 
College. Practically all departments of the institution offering 
major subjects retain in residence during one or both terms of the 
Summer Session, teachers particularly qualified to direct graduate 
study in their respective fields. In many subjects the Summer 
Session is the most satisfactory for graduate work. The entire 
laboratory, library and instructional facilities will be put at the 
disposal of those who can profit by graduate work in the technical 
and related scientific fields. The graduate faculty remains prac- 
tically intact during the first term, and a considerable proportion 
are likewise in residence during the second term. 

The student expecting to do graduate work in summer school 
will find a more detailed account of method of matriculation and 
requirements for degrees in the Graduate Catalogue, which may 
be had on request from the College Registrar or from the Dean of 
the Graduate College. 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE COLLEGE 

Graduates of approved colleges may be admitted to graduate stand- 
ing in Iowa State College by filling out duplicate applications for 
admission and filing these together with a complete authoritative 
transcript of college records, including entrance credits. Upon ap- 
proval of the application a matriculation card will be issued by the 
College Registrar. Enrollment in graduate work does not neces- 
sarily imply candidacy for a degree. 

After registration in the Graduate College the student may be 
admitted to candidacy for a degree after total residence of at least 
one quarter, provided the specific prerequisite requirements of the 
department in which major work is to be taken have been met. This 
must be done at least one quarter before the conferring of a master's 
degree, and one year (or in exceptional cases two quarters) before 
the conferring of a doctor's degree. 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

Master of Science. For the requirements for the degree Master 
of Science the graduate catalogue should be consulted. In general 
at least thirty credits must be completed in graduate subjects in the 
department in which the major units are taken, and not to exceed 
fifteen credit credits in minor graduate work, a total of at least 
forty-five credits. Inasmuch as fifteen credits represents full gradu- 
ate work for a quarter, it is evident that this is the equivalent of 
three quarters spent in graduate work. 

The degree of Master of Science in Vocational Education is con- 
ferred upon students having excellent preliminary training in edu- 
cation who complete at least thirty graduate credits in Vocational 
Education and thirty additional credits in either agriculture, home 
economics or trades and industries. For details see the description 
under Vocational Education below. 

Doctor of Philosophy. Those who wish to pursue work in sum- 
mer school looking toward the degree Doctor of Philosophy should 
secure information as to requirements from the Graduate Catalogue] 
Many research problems can be undertaken to advantage during the 
summer season, particularly in agriculture and the sciences most 
closely related to agriculture. 

18 



I 



GRADUATE SUBJECTS OFFERED IN THE SUMMER 

SESSION 

In the following a list of subjects open to graduate students is 
included under each department. In most cases the departments 
have specific requirements which can be ascertained by consultation 
of a Graduate Catalogue. The description of the subjects num- 
bered below will be found under the respective departmental head- 
ings beginning on page 22. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 106a, 107, 108a. 
Open for minor only to graduate students. 61, 77, S5a. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 500, 605, 510, 515, 520. 
Open to graduates or advanced undergraduates. Major or minor. 
300, 434. 

Open for minor only to graduate students. 218. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 31b, 75, 143, 173, 262, 381, 
382. 

Open for minor only to graduate students. 3. 

BOTANY 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 148aC, 205, 416, 481. 
Open to graduates or advanced undergraduates. Major or minor. 325, 
326, 415a, 415b. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 511, 512, 513. 

CHEMISTRY 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 517a, 521a, 615a, 620a, 671a, 
758a, 766a, 805a, 841, 901. 

Open to graduates or advanced undergraduates. Major or minor. 703a. 
Open for minor only to graduate students. 651a, 802, 803. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 1109, 1112. 
Open to graduates or advanced undergraduates. Major or minor. 424, 
425, 426. 

DAIRYING 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 80, 81, 82, 83, 143. 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE 
Including Agricultural Economics, Rural Sociology and Farm 

Management 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 75, 159, 160, 340, 350, 380. 
Open to graduates or advanced undergraduates. Major or minor. 128, 
135, 315, 330. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 510. 

FARM CROPS AND SOILS 

Farm crops. Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 181, 182, 281a, 
281b, 281c, 282. 

Soils. Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 281, 282, 381, 382, 
391, 392, 481, 482. 

Soils. Open to graduates or advanced undergraduates. Major or 
minor. 151, 251, 252. 

19 



FORESTRY 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 91, 92, 93a. 

AGRICULTURAL AND MINING GEOLOGY 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 510, 520. 

AGRICULTURAL HISTORY 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 320. 
Open for minor only to graduate students. 124. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 510, 525, 530, 540, 550. 
Open to graduates or advanced undergraduates. Major or minor. 
352a, 353, 354, 355, 356a, 357a, 470a, 472a, 472b. 
Open for minor only to graduate students. 471. 

HORTICULTURE 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 78, 178, 278, 378. 

PHYSICS 

Open for minor only to graduate students. 208, 210. 

VETERINARY ANATOMY 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 713, 714. 

VETERINARY PATHOLOGY 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 715, 716. 

VETERINARY PHYSIOLOGY 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 715. 

VETERINARY SURGERY 

Open for minor only to graduate students. 717. 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

Students desiring to major in agricultural education must present 
credits substantially equivalent to those required of one of the under- 
graduate courses in agriculture including the elementary subjects in 
education and psychology. 

Students desiring to major in vocational education must present at 
least 30 credits in psychology and education. Minor work for students 
majoring in vocational education must be chosen in agriculture, home 
economics, or trades and industries, as indicated under a, b, or c below. 

a. Students who minor in agriculture must complete at least 30 quar- 

ter credit hours agricultural subjects. Where one subject only 
is listed below for a department this must be included, and at 
least half of the courses listed for each department must be in- 
cluded. Animal Husbandry! 101, 2 credits; 102, 2 credits; 103, 
2 credits; 111, 3V 3 credits; 112, 3% credits. Farm Crops: 151, 4 
credits; 152, 4 credits. Dairy: 15, 4 credits. Horticulture: 71, 4 
credits. Soils: 151, •". '/•. credits; 251, 3^ credits; 252, 3% credits. 
Science prerequisites for particular subjects must be met. 

b. Students desiring 1 to take minor work in trades and industries 

(including manual training) must complete mathematics through 
analytical geometry and secure credit in the following subjects: 
Trade* and industries 1, 2 credits; 2, 2 credits (or, Mechanical 
Engineering 111, 2 credits, and Mechanical Engineering 151, 3 

20 



credits); 14, 3 credits; 23, 2 credits. Mechanical Engineering 171, 
3 credits, and 313, 2 credits. He must also complete at least 15 
credits in subjects chosen from the following list: Trades and 
Industries 16, 6 credits; 18, 3 credits; 20, 3 credits; 26, 3 credits; 
27, 3 credits. Mechanical Engineering- 173, 2 credits; 211, 2 credits; 
213, 3 credits; 272, 3 credits; 273, 2 credits. Agricultural Engi- 
neering 51, 2 credits; 52, 2 credits; 55, 2 credits: 60, 4 credits; 74, 
2 credits. 

c. Students taking minor work in home economics must complete 
at least thirty credit hours in the elementary subjects in home 
economics. 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 120, 521, 525. 

Open to graduates or advanced undergraduates. Major or minor. 54, 
i5, 57, 58, 109, 131a. 

Open for minor only to graduate students. 51, 52, 53. 

ZOOLOGY AND ENTOMOLOGY 

Open to graduates only. Major or minor. 181, 380, 480. 



21 



COLLEGIATE INSTRUCTION 

The subjects described below are selected from those offered 
during the other quarters of the college year. They are taught by 
members of the regular college faculty. The descriptions are quoted 
from the regular College catalog. Other subjects may be offered 
when requested by a sufficient number of students. 

Inasmuch as subjects taught during the Summer Session are com- 
pleted in a six weeks' term, it is necessary in each subject to double 
the number of class and laboratory periods required in the other 
quarters. The number for the Summer Session is indicated in each 
subject description. 

Eight or nine credits per term constitutes full work. The abso- 
lute maximum credits for which any student may register during 
either term is ten, and then only upon previous demonstration of 
exceptional ability. 

Teachers of vocational subjects in high schools will note that 
attendance through an entire Summer Session (two terms) will 
enable one to secure sixteen to eighteen credits in agriculture, home 
economics or trades and industries. In agriculture any combination 
of animal husbandry, agricultural engineering, dairy, farm crops, 
farm management, poultry, horticulture or soils is acceptable and 
all of this is the right type for the prospective high school teacher. 

The reasonably small units of specialized work are considered 
much more desirable than courses in general agriculture. The 
schedule is so arranged as to avoid conflict and enable the student 
to carry the full amount of agriculture during the first and second 
halves of the summer school. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION (See Vocational Education) 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS, FARM MANAGEMENT, AND 
RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

(Administered jointly by the Divisions of Industrial Science and 
of Agriculture as a part of the Department of Economic Science.) 
Professor Nourse, Agricultural Hall, Room 315 
See "Economic Science," page 29. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

(Administered jointly by the Dean of Agriculture and the Dean 
of Engineering.) 

Office, Agricultural Engineering Hall, Room 1. 
Professor J. B. Davidson 

SHOP WORK 

51. ForKe. Forging ;in( ] welding iron and steel. Making - , hardening, 
and tempering small tools. Helpful in repair of farm equipment. Labs. 
4, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $3.00. 2d term. M. W. F. S. 9-12. 

52. Carpentry. Use care, and sharpening of tools. Joining, framing 
and rafter cutting:. Helpful in farm building, planning and construction. 
Labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $5.00. 1st term. M. Tu. Th. F. 2-5. 

54. Practical Farm Mechanic*. Plan and equipment of a farm shop. 
Use of farm shop tools in the repair and maintenance of farm equip- 
in. •hi. May be substituted for A. F. 51 or 52. Labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 2; 

3.00. lBt term. M. Tu. Th. F. 8-11. 

55. Advanced Forge Work. Repair and care of agricultural equip- 
ment, plowshare work, autogenic welding, forging of special farm 

22 



J 



equipment and tools. For prospective teachers. Prerequisites 51 or 
equivalent. Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $3.00. 2d term. M. Tu. Th. 
F. 1-4. 

FARM MACHINERY AND FARM POWER 

60. Farm Machinery, Farm Motors. Mechanics and materials. Con- 
struction, adjustment, operation, and testing; measurement and trans- 
mission of power. Prerequisite Physics 101 or equivalent. Rec. 6; 
lab. 2. 3 hr., credit 4; fee $2.00. 1st term M. W. F. S. 8. Tu. Th. 1, lab. 
Tu. Th. 2-5. 2d term, 8, lab. W. S. 9-12. 

61. Gas Engines and Tractors. The construction, operation, adjust- 
ment, and care of gasoline and oil engines and tractors. Prerequisite 
60. Rec. 2; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.50. 2d term. M. W. 1, M. 
W. F. 2-5. 

FARM BUILDINGS AND FARM SANITARY EQUIPMENT 

74. Concrete and Masonry. Materials, specifications, and tests; mix- 
tures, forms, reinforcement; uses of concrete on the farm. Other fire- 
proof building materials. Lect. 2; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $2.00. 1st 
term. Tu. Th. 7, M. W. 1-4. 

77. Farm Sanitary Equipment. Lighting, heating, ventilation, water 
supply, plumbing, sewage disposal. Rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee 
$1.50. 1st term. M. Tu. Th. F. 10, M. W. 1-4. 

79. Farm Buildings and Equipment. (For Animal Husbandry stu- 
dents.) Plans, materials, construction, lighting, heating, and venti- 
lation of farm buildings; water supply, sewage disposal. Prerequisite 
80. Rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $1.00. 1st term. M. Tu. Th. F. 7, 
W. S. 7-10. 

DRAWING, SURVEYING, DRAINAGE, IRRIGATION 

80. Graphic 3Iethods. Plotting and charting agricultural statistics. 
Presentation, analysis, and illustrations of experimental data. Lab. 2, 
3 hr. ; credit 1. 1st term. Tu. Th. 1-4. 

81. Farm Surveying and Drainage. Design, location and construction, 
drainage surveying. Land surveying for area and mapping. Land de- 
scriptions. Drawing maps. Prerequisite 80. Rec. 4; labs. 4, 3 hr.; 
credit 4; fee $1.00. 1st term. M. Tu. Th. F. 8, lab. M. Tu. Th. F. 9-12. 

85a. Drainage Engineering. Drainage of agricultural lands, drainage 
districts; reclamation; flood control and protection; pumping; storage; 
analysis of hydrographic data. Prerequisites C. E. 328, Soils 151, M. 
E. 372. Rec. 2; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.00. 1st term-. Tu. Th. 9, 
lab. Tu. Th. 1-4. 

RESEARCH 

106a. Farm Machinery. Professor Davidson. 1st term. As arranged. 

106b. Farm Power. Associate Professor Mervine. 2d term. As ar- 
ranged. 

107. Farm Structures. Professor Davidson, Assistant Professor Fen- 
ton. 1st term. As arranged. 

108a. Drainage Irrigation. Assistant Professor Ayers. 1st term. As 
arranged. 

AGRICULTURAL. JOURNALISM 

Professor Beckman, Agricultural Hall, Room 16. 

28a. Beginning: Technical Journalism. News values, news style, news 
gathering and writing and the applications to agricultural, engineering 
and home economics subject-matter. Prerequisites, English 40c, 140c, 
or 240c. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term, 7:00, 2d term, 8:00. 

29a. Feature Articles for Technical Journals. Writing of the longer 
feature and magazine articles dealing with agriculture, engineering 
or home economics. Prerequisite 28a; for Ag. Jr. students 28c. Rec. 6; 
credit 3. 1st term, 8:00. 

AGRONOMY 

(See "Farm Crops and Soils," page 31.) 

ANIMAL, HUSBANDRY 

Professor Kildee, Agricultural Hall, Room 103 
101. Types and Market Classes of Beef and Dual-Purpose Cattle. 

Judging; types, carcasses, markets, market classifications. Rec. and 
labs. 4, 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.00. 1st term-. M. W. F. S. 7-9 or 3-5. 

23 



102. Types and Market Classes of Sheep and Horses. Similar to 101. 
Rec. and labs. 4, 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.00. 1st term. M. W. F. S. 10-12. 

103. Types and Market Classes of Dairy Cattle and Hogs. Similar to 
101. Rec. and labs. 4, 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.00. 1st term. M. W. F. 
S. 1-3. 

111. Breeds of Beef and Dual-Furpose Cattle. Judging; origin, his- 
tory, type, and adaptability. Prerequisite 101. Lectures 4; labs. 4, 2 
hr.; credit 3%; fee $1.00. 1st term, M. W. F. S. 3, lab. M. W. F. S. 1-3. 
2d term, M. Tu. Th. F. 9, lab. M. Tu. Th. F. 7-9. 

112. Breeds of Sheep and Horses. Similar to 111. Prerequisite 102. 
Lectures 4; labs. 4, 2 hr.; credit 3%; fee $1.00. 1st term, M. W. F. S. 9, 
lab. M. W. P. S. 10-12. 2d term, M. Tu. Th. F. 1. M. Tu. Th. F. 10-12. 

113. Breeds of Dairy Cattle and Hogs. Similar to 111. Prerequisite 
103. Lectures 4; labs. 4, 2 hr.; credit 3V 3 ; fee $1.00. 1st term, M. W. 
F. S. 9, lab, M. W. F. S. 7-9. 2d term, M. Tu. Th. F. 2, lab. M. Tu. Th. 
F. 3-5. 

218. Animal Nutrition. Fundamental basis of ' nutrition; practical 
methods; nutritive ratios and feeding standards. Prerequisite Chem. 
752; Vet. Anat. 610; prerequisite or classification in Vet. Phys. 611. Lec- 
tures 6; credit 3. Assistant Professor Anderson. 1st term. M. W. F. 
S. 8, W. F. 1. 

224. Feeding and Management of Beef Cattle and Sheep. Prerequisite 

222. Lectures 4; lab. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $2.00. 2d term. M. Tu. 
F. S. 11, lab. Tu. Th. 7-9. 

240. Animal Feeding. Composition and digestibility of feeding stuffs; 
preparation; feeding standards and calculation of rations. Prerequisite 
Chem. 751. Lectures 10; credit 5. Assistant Professor Anderson. 1st 
term. 10:00 and 4:00 except Saturday. 

300. Advanced Study of the Dairy Breeds. Origin, history, and char- 
acteristics of important strains and families. Prerequisites 113, and 
Vet. Anat. 610. Rec. 6; lecture and labs. 4, 2 hr.; credit 4y 3 ; fee $1.00. 
Associate Professor Weaver. 1st term. 9:00, lab. Tu. Th. 7-9 and 1-3. 

310. Dairy Herd Practice. Efficient economic production of milk; 
care, feeding, housing, and management of dairy cattle. Prerequisite 

223. Rec. 10; credit 5. Associate Professor Weaver. 1st term. 11:00 
and 1:00 except Saturday. 

400. General Poultry Husbandry. Commercial production; judging, 
breeding, housing, sanitation, marketing. Rec. 6; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 
4; fee $2.00. 2d term. 1:00, lab. W. S. 2-5. 

402. General Poultry Husbandry. Feeding, incubation, and brooding. 
Rec. 2; lab. 2, 2 hr., credit 1%; fee $2.00. 2d term. Tu. Th. 2, lab. Tu. 
Th. 3-5. 

434. Special Poultry Problems. Experimentation, technique, practice. 
Prerequisite 402. Labs. 3, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. Professor Bitten- 
bender. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

500. Advanced Animal Production and Nutrition. Feeding and man- 
agement of live stock. Practical experimental methods, fundamental 
research work. Credit 3 to 10. Professors Kildee, Evvard, Shearer, 
Associate Professor Caine, and Chief Lamb. 1st and 2d terms. As ar- 
ranged. 

505. Research in Animal Breeding. Special problems in heredity and 
breeding. Credit 3 to 10. Professor Shearer. 1st and 2d terms. As 
arranged. 

510. Besearch in Dairy Husbandry. Dairy breeds; milk production 
and herd management. Credit 3 to 10. Professor Kildee, Associate 
Professors McCandlish and Weaver. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

515. Research in Poultry Husbandry. Incubation, brooding, feeding, 
breeding, marketing. Principles and practices of management of flocks. 
Credit 3 to 10. Professor I'.i tt .enbender. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

520. Besearch in Meats. Special problems in selecting, killing, cutting 
and curing of meat on the farm. Credit 3 to 10. Associate Professor 
Helser. 1st term. As arranged. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Professor Buchanan, Room 101, Science Building. 

GENERAL BACTEBIOI.OGY 
?,. General Bacteriology. Morphology, classification, physiology, and 
cultivation of bacteria; relation of bacteria to health of man, animals 
and plants. 

24 



A. (Animal Husbandry students.) Prerequisite, Organic Chemistry. 
Lectures 6; labs. 12 hrs.; credit 5; fee $5.00. 1st term. Lect. 7:00, 
lab. 8-12 as arranged. 

B. (Farm Crops and Soils and Farm Management students.) Prere- 
quisite, Organic Chemistry. Lectures 6; labs. 12 hrs.; credit 5; fee 
$5.00. 1st term. Lect. 7:00, lab. 8-12 as arranged. 

C • Dairying, Industrial Science, and Industrial Chemistry students.) 
Prerequisite, Organic Chemistry. Lectures 6; is.bs. 12 to 18 hrs.; 
credit 5 to 6; fee $5.00. 1st term. Lect. 7:00, lab. 8-12 as arranged. 

D. (Horticulture students.) Prerequisite, Organic Chemistry. Lectures 
6; labs. 12 hrs.; credit 5; fee $5.00. 1st term. Lect. 7:00, lab. 8-12 
as arranged. 

E. (Forestry students.) Prerequisite, Organic Chemistry. Lectures 6; 
labs. 6 hrs.; credit 4; fee $5.00. 1st term. Lect. 7:00, lab. 8-12 as 
arranged. 

4. Household Bacteriology. Bacteria in their relation to the problems 
of the home and community. Lectures 6; labs. 12 hrs.; credit 5; fee $5.00. 
1st term. Lect. 7:00, lab. 8-12 as arranged. 

31a-31b. Research in General or Systematic Bacteriology. For under- 
graduates or graduates. Credit 1 to 10; fee $5.00. Professor Buchanan. 
1st term. As arranged. 

VETERINARY AND PATHOGENIC BACTERIOLOGY 

75. Research in Pathogenic Bacteriology. (Graduate.) Prerequisites 
3 and 64 or equivalent. Fee $5.00. Professor Murray or Levine. 1st 
term. As arranged. 

DAIRY BACTERIOLOGY 

143 (Dairy 143). Research in Dairy Bacteriology. (Graduate.) Pre- 
requisite 102. Professor Hammer. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

SANITARY BACTERIOLOGY AND HYGIENE 

173. Research in Sanitary Bacteriology. Prerequisites 3 and 156 or 
equivalent. Fee $5.00. Associate Professor Levine. 1st term. As ar- 
ranged. 

HOUSEHOLD BACTERIOLOGY 
262. Research in Household Bacteriology. Professor Buchanan. 1st 
term. As arranged. 

SOIL BACTERIOLOGY 

381 (Soils 381). Research in Soil Bacteriology. Field, greenhouse, or 
laboratory experiments on bacterial activities in the soil. Credit 1 to 
10; fee $3.00. Professor Brown. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

382 (Soils 382). Conferences in Soil Bacteriology. Reports and discus- 
sions on current investigation. Professor Brown. 1st and 2d terms. 
As arranged. 

BOTANY 

Professor Pammel, Central Building, Room 314 

MORPHOLOGY 

135. Elementary Plant Morphology. (Agricultural students.) Seed 
plants, their structure and function; study of the various groups of 
simpler plants. Rec. 2; labs. 4, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $2.00. 1st term. 
Tu. Th. 4, lab. M. W. F. S. 3-5. 

148ac. Advanced Courses in Morphology. (Research students.) Spe- 
cial problems. Rec. and labs, as arranged; credit 5 or 10; fee $3.00 or 
$6.00 each quarter. Professor Martin. 1st term. As arranged. 

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 
205. Research in Physiology. (Graduate.) Specific problems in plant 
physics, plant chemics, growth, and movement. Prerequisite 200. Rec. 
2; labs. 4-10, 3 hr.; credit 3 to 6; fee $3.00 to $10.00. Associate Professor 
Bakke. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

320. General Plant Pathology. Discussion of the nature, cause, and 
control of diseases of field, orchard, and forest crops. Prerequisite 200. 
Rec. 4; labs. 6, 3 hr., or 6, 2 hr.; credit 5 or 4; fee $4.00. 1st term. M. 
W. F. S. 7, lab. 9-12. 

325. Advanced Plant Pathology. Cultural, physiological, histological, 
and cytological technique. Laboratory practice in isolation of parasites, 

25 



germination, inoculation, and carrying stock cultures. Prerequisites 320. 
Rec. 4; labs. 6, 3 hr.; credit 5; fee $5.00. 1st term. A.s arranged. 

326. Plant Pathology. Specific problems in the diseases of plants. 
Prerequisites 200 and 325. Credit 2 to 10; fee $3.00 to $5.00. Professor 
Melhus. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

TAXONOMY 

415a, 415b. Systematic Botany. Flowering- plants or thallophytes. 
Historical survey of various systems of classification; groups by means 
of representatives. (415a) Systematic Spermatophyte.s. Prerequisite 129 
or 135. Rec. 4; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 4; fee $4.00. (415b) Advanced Con- 
ference in Systematic Botany. Special groups of spermatophytes. Rec. 
4; labs. 6, 3 hr.; credit 5; fee $3.00. Professor Pammel. 1st term. (415a) 
M. W. F. S, 11, lab. M. W. F. S. 1-4. (415b) as arranged. 

416. Research in Systematic Botany. 

A. (Agricultural students.) Plants of economic importance and 
and those related to agricultural and horticultural problems. 
Prerequisites 144 or 200, 415, Zool. 1 or Bact. 3. Credit 3 
or 5; fee $3.00. 1st term. As arranged. 

B. (Forestry students.) Botany of national and state parks 
and forests. Summer field work. Credit 3: fee $3.00. Pro- 
fessor Pammel. 1st term. As arranged. 

INDUSTRIAL, BOTANY 

481a, 481b. Research in Seed Testing. Structure, impurities, and adul- 
teration of seeds. Prerequisites 415 and 490. Lectures and labs, as ar- 
ranged; credit 5; fee $3.00. Professor Pammel. 1st term. As arranged. 

490a. Botany of Weeds. Principles. Injury of weeds to farm, garden, 
and horticultural crops; origin and distribution. Prerequisites 129 or 
135. Rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $3.00. 1st term. As arranged. 

CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

Associate Professor Cox, Engineering Annex, Room 110 

321. Hand Made Pottery. Exercises in modeling and decorating 
simple forms of art pottery. Prerequisite H. Ec. 130b or equivalent. 
Labs. 2, 3 or 4 hrs.; credit 1 or 2 ; fee $5.00 per credit hr. 1st term. 
Lab. 9-12 or 1-4, except Saturday P. M. 

322. Hand Made Pottery. Continuation of 321. Work on potters' 
wheel. Decorative processes. Concrete garden pottery. Labs. 2, 3 or 4 
hrs.; credit 1 or 2; fee $5.00 per credit hr. 1st term. Lab. 9-12 or 1-4, 
except Saturday P. M. 

420. Special Problems in Ceramic Technology. Credit 2-4; fee $3.00. 
1st term. As arranged. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

(Administered jointly by the Divisions of Engineering and Industrial 

Science) 
Professor Sweeney, Chemistry Building, Room 78 
123. Chemical Engineering. Research. Original problems in chemical 
engineering and applied electro-chemistry. Credit and fees as arranged. 
1st term. 

nil. Advanced Chemical Engineering Design. Des'gn, layout, and 
construction of chemical plants and machinery. Labs. 2-6, 3 hr.; credit 
1-3. Professor Sweeney. 1st term. As arranged. 

512. Advanced Chemical Engineering Design. Continuation of 511. 
Labs. 2-6; 3 hr.; credit 1-3. Professor Sweeney. 1st term. As arranged. 

513. Advanced Chemical Engineering Design. Planning industrial 
chemical laboratories. Labs. 2-6, 3 hr.; credit 1-3. Professor Sweeney, 
Assistant Professor Wright. 1st term. As arranged. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Coover, Chemistry Building, Room 202 
INORGANIC CHEMISTRY AND QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 

502. General <'hemis<ry. Principles and the non-metallic elements. 

A. For students who have not had high school chemistry. Lect. 

4; rec. 2; lab. 2, '.', hr.; credit -1; deposit $7.f>0. 1st term. 

Lect. 10:00, lab. Tu. Th. S. 8-10. 
P.. For students who hare had high school chemistry. Lect. 4; 

rec. 2; lab. 2, :>, hr.; credit 4; deposit $7.50. 1st term. Lect. 

10:00, lab. Tu. Th. S. 8-10. 

26 



( '. For students desiring a more extended study. Lect. 4; fee. 
2; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 5; fee $10.00. 1st term. Lect. 10:00, 
lab. 8-10. 

503. General Chemistry. Metallic elements. 

A. For students who have not had high sehool chemistry. Pre- 

requisite 502. Lect. 4; rec. 2; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 4; deposit 
$7.50. 1st term. Lect. 10:00, lab. M. W. F. 8-10. 2d term. 
Lect. 11, lab. M. W. F. 9-11. 

B. For students who have had high school chemistry. Pre- 

requisite 502. Lect. 4; rec. 2; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 4; deposit 
$7.50. 1st and 2d terms. (Given at same time as 503 A.) 

C. For students desiring a more extended study. Prerequisite 

502. Lect. 4; rec. 2; labs. 4", 3 hr.; credit 5; deposit $10.00. 
1st term, lect. 10:00, lab. 8-10. 2d term, lect. 11:00, lab. 9-11. 

504. Qualitative Analysis. Tests for and separation of the common 
metallic and non-metallic ions. Prerequisite 503. Lect. 2; rec. 2; labs. 
4. 3 hr.; credit 4; deposit $10.00. 1st term, M. W. F. S. 9, lab. 10-12. 
2d term, M. Tu. W. F. 8, lab. 9-11. 

C. For students desiring a more extended study. Rec. 6; labs. 
4, 3 hr.; credit 5; deposit $9.00-$10.00. 1st term, 9:00, lab. 
10-12. 2d term, 8:00, lab. 9-11. 
509a, 509b. General Chemistry. (Home Economics students.) Prin- 
ciples and the non-metallic elements. (509a) Lect. 4; rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; 
credit 5; deposit $7.50. (509b) Metallic elements and their compounds. 
Lect. 4; rec. 2; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 4; deposit $7.50. 1st term. 10:00 and 

2 extra rec, lab. M. W. F. 8-10. 

517a. Systematic Inorganic Chemistry. An advanced course. Pre- 
requisite 515b. Lect. 4; credit 2. 1st term. As arranged. 

521a. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Atomic structure, 
periodic law, valency, ionzation, etc. Prerequisite 515b. Lect. 3; credit 
3. Associate Professor Brown. 1st term. As arranged. 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

615a. Advanced Physical Chemistry. Colloids, phase rule, and cataly- 
sis. Prerequisite 606b. Lect. 4; labs. 4 or 6, 3 hr.; credit 2 to 5; deposit 
$12.50. Professor Wilkinson. 2d term. As arranged. 

620a. Advanced Physical Chemistry. Special topics including chemi- 
cal thermodynamics, electromotive force and pyrometric measurements 
and the theory of indicators. Prerequisite 606b. Lect. 4; labs. 2 to 6, 

3 hr.; credit 2 to 5; deposit $7.50 or $12.50. Associate Professor Hayes. 
1st term. As arranged. 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

651a. Organic Chemistry. (Chemists, Chemical Engineers, and stu- 
dents specializing in the applied biological sciences and medicine.) Pre- 
requisite 504. Lect. 4; rec. 2; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 2 to 5; deposit $12.50. 
1st term. As arranged. 

671a. Advanced Organic Laboratory. Involves preliminary research 
work in synthesis and a study of reactions of compounds of theoretical 
and industrial importance. Prerequisite 651c. Labs. 6 to 10, 3 hr. ; 
credit 3 to 5; deposit $12.50. Associate Professor Gilman. 1st term. As 
arranged. 

FOOD AND SANITARY CHEMISTRY 

703a. Organic Analysis. Determination of nitrogen, sulphur and 
phosphorus, the alcohols, aldehydes, etc. Prerequisites 561c, 651 c. Lect. 
or conferences 4; labs. 2 to 6, 3 hr.; credit 3 to 5; deposit $12.50. Pro-, 
fessor Coover. 1st term. As arranged. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

751a, 751b. Applied Organic Chemistry. Properties, classification, and 
methods of preparation of organic compounds. Special emphasis upon 
agricultural applications. Prerequisite 504. (751a) Lect. 4; labs. 4, 
2 hr. (751b) Lect. 4; lab. 2, 4 hr.; credit 3%; deposit $10.00. 1st term. 
(751a) M. Tu. W. F. 10, lab. M. W. F. S. 8-10. (751b) Tu. W. Th. F. 2, 
lab. Tu. Th. 8-12. 

752. Agricultural Analysis and Bio-Chemistry. Gravimetric and vol- 
umetric analysis; analysis of agricultural products: lectures on bio- 
chemistry and the elements of nutrition. Prerequisite 751b. Lect. 4; 
lab. 2, 4 hr.; credit 3V 3 ; deposit $10.00. 1st term. M. W. F. S. 11, lab. 
Tu. Th. 8-12. 

758a. Dio-physical Chemistry. An advanced topic course dealing with 

27 



the applications of the principles and methods of physical chemistry 
to biology. Prerequisites 514, 561c, 606b, 651c, 806 and courses in bac- 
teriology and botany. Lect. 4; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 2 or 4; deposit $12.50. 
Associate Professor Fulmer. 1st term. As arranged. 

766a. Soil Chemistry. Introductory to research. Physical, analytical, 
and bio-chemical methods in soil chemistry; topic assignments; research 
problems. Prerequisite or parallel 765a, 765b, 765c. Lect. 4; labs. 2 to 
6, 3 hrs.; credit 3 to 5; deposit $12.50. Associate Professor Clarke. 1st 
term. As arranged. 

HOUSEHOLD CHEMISTRY 

775. Applied Organic Chemistry. Fundamental principles of organic 
chemistry. Special attention to compounds of household importance. 
Prerequisite 509b. Lect. 6; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 5; deposit $12.50. 1st 
term. 11:00, lab. M. W. F. S. 8-11. 

776. Food Chemistry. Elementary quantitative analysis; study of 
common food and household products, their composition and methods of 
analysis. Prerequisite 775. Lect. 6; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 5; deposit $12.50. 
1st term. 8:00, lab. M. W. F. S. 9-12. 

PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY AND NUTRITION 

802. Physiological Chemistry and Nutrition. Chemical composition 
of living matter; digestion; fundamentals of nutrition. Prerequisite 752 
or 776. Lect. 6; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 3 or 5; deposit $12.50. 1st term. 
9:00, lab. 10-12. 2d term. 

803. Advanced Physiological Chemistry and Nutrition. Chemistry of 
tissues, urine feces; metabolism; specific effects of faulty nutrition. 
Prerequisite 802. Lect. 6; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 3 to 5; deposit $12.50. 
Associate Professor Nelson. 1st term. As arranged. 

805a. Bio-Chemical Preparations. Isolation and study of substances 
from living matter of importance in physiological chemistry and nutri- 
tion. Prerequisite 803. Lect. 4; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 4; deposit $12.50. 
Associate Professor Nelson. 1st term. As arranged. 

841. Special Problems. Physiological chemistry applied to dietetics, 
veterinary medicine, animal nutrition, bacteriology, etc. Prerequisite 
805c. Conference 2; labs. 4, 3 hr. or more; credit 3 or more; deposit 
$12.50. Associate Professor Nelson. 1st term. As arranged. 

RESEARCH 
901. Research. (Graduate students.) Credits as arranged. Deposit 
$15.00. 

A. Inorganic Chemistry. Professors Brown and 

1st term. 

B. Analytical Chemistry. Professor Hayes. 1st term. As ar- 

ranged. 
C; Physical Chemistry. Professor Wilkinson. 2d term. As 
arranged. 

D. Organic Chemistry. Professor Gilman. 1st term. As ar- 

ranged. 

E. Organic Analysis, Food and Sanitary Chemistry. Professors 

Coover and Buchanan. 1st term. As arranged. 

F. Agricultural Bio-Chemistry. Professor Fulmer. 1st term. 

G. Physiological Chemistry and Nutrition. Professor Nelson. 

1st term. As arranged. 
H. Household and Textile Chemistry. 1st term. As arranged. 
I. Soil Chemistry. Assistant Professor Clark. 1st term. As 
arranged. 

CIVIL. ENGINEERING 

Professor Fuller, Engineering Hall, Room 315 
SURVEYING 

213. Surveying. Use and adjustment of level and trarsit. Traversing. 
Level Ing. The stadia. Topographical surveying. Prerequisite 113. Rec. 
2; labs. 6, 3 hr.; credit 4; Pee $3.00. 1st term. Tu. Th. 3, lab. M. W. F. 
S. 9-12, W. S. 1-4. 

:',2. r ,. Surveying. Chaining. Care and uses of transit and level. Field 
problems a/id notes. Building layouts. Machine foundations and setting. 
Calculations. Prerequisite Math. 2. Rec. 2; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 3; 
fee $3.00. 1st term. Tu. Th. 1, lab. M. W. Th. F. 9-12. 

IIICH WAY ENGINEERING 

-124. Bituminous Materials Tenting. Standard tests for bituminous 

28 






road materials and their application to material specifications. Rec. 
2; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $6.00. 1st term. As arranged. 

425. Highway Administration. Organization for highway administra- 
tion, reports, forms, accounting methods, cost-keeping, inspection and 
construction supervision. Prerequisite 307. Rec. 6; credit 3. 2d term. 
As arranged. 

426. Highway Specification. Form' and substance of standard and 
special specifications for highway construction. Prerequisite 307. Rec. 
6; credit 3. 2d term. As arranged. 

1112. Highway Engineering. Advanced pavement design; the relation 
between types of roads and methods of financing; advanced work in 
bituminous and non-bituminous road materials testing. Professor Agg. 
1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

STRUCTURAL. ENGINEERING 
1109. Structural Engineering. Advanced work in the design of all 
types of concrete and steel structures. Professor Fuller. 1st term. As 
arranged. 

DAIRYING 

Professor Mortensen, Dairy Building, Room 9 
15. Farm Dairying. Secretion, composition, testing, and separation 
of milk; the farm' manufacture of butter, ice cream, and cheese. Lect. 
6; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 4; fee $2.00. 1st term. 7:00, lab. Tu. Th. 1-4. 

65. Domestic Dairying. Selection, care, and use of milk, and its 
products; practice in the manufacture of various dairy products. Pre- 
requisite Chem. 775. Rec. 4; lab. 2, 2 hr. ; credit 2%. 1st term. M. Tu. 
W. Th. 9, lab. M. W. 1-3. 

80. Research in Manufacture of Butter. Professor Mortensen. 1st 
term. As arranged. 

81. Research in Manufacture of Ice Cream. Professor Mortensen. 1st 
term. As arranged. 

82. Research in Management of Dairy Plants. Professor Mortensen. 
1st term As arranged. 

83. Research in Market Milk. Professor Hammer. 1st and 2d terms. 
As arranged. 

143. (Bact. 143.) Research in Dairy Bacteriology. Prerequisite 102. 
Professor Hammer. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE 

Applied Economics and Social Science 

Professor Brindley, Central Building, Room 223 

GENERAL. ECONOMICS 

50. Elementary Economics. (Students in Home Economics.) Recita- 
tions 6; credit 3. 1st term. 1:00. 

75. Advanced Economic and Social Principles. Conference subject. 
Credit 5. Professors Brindley, Nourse, Von Tungeln, 1st term. As 
arranged. 

119. Introduction to Agricultural Economics. I. Farm Organization. 
Elementary economic principles of production as applied to the organi- 
zation and management of the farm business. Prerequisite History 124 
or equivalent. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 10:00, lab. M. W. F. 3-5. 

120. Introduction to Agricultural Economics. II. Cost and Price. 
Economic forces and institutions with which the farmer is concerned. 
Prerequisite 119. Lect. and rec. 6; credit 3. 2d term. 1:00. 

122. Farm Accounting. The application of elementary accounting 
forms and principles to the farm business; introduction to farm cost 
accounting method. Lect. 2; lab. 4, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $1.00. 2d term. 
W. F. 7, M. W. F. S. 8-10. 

128. Marketing Agricultural Products. Structure of agricultural mar- 
kets, commercial practices, shipping and selling methods, private or- 
ganization and government agencies and regulation. Prerequisite 120. 
Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 2:00. 

135. Problems in Advanced Agricultural Economics. Individual study 
of special problems in marketing, farm' organization, land tenure, etc. 
Credit 1 to 3. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

159. Research. Individual investigation of selected problems. By 
arrangement. Credit 1 to 6. Professor Nourse. 1st and 2d terms. As 
arranged. 

29 



160. Thesis. Research work and preparation of thesis, which may 
be credited as partial requirements for advanced degrees. Professor 
Nourse. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

220. Economies for Engineers. Special reference to the problems of 
the engineering profession. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 1:00. 

RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

315. Rural Sociolog-y. Forces and factors in rural social progress; 
development and adaptation of rural institutions and organizations. 
Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 7:00. 

330. Rural Community Org-anization. Program and plan for the 
organization and development of various clubs, circles, social centers, 
councils, etc. Prerequisite one study in Rural Sociology. Rec. 6; credit 
3. 1st term. 8:00. 

340. Research. Special problems in the field of rural sociology. Con- 
ference course, senior year. Credit 1 to 6. Professor Von Tungeln. 1st 
and 2d terms. As arranged. 

350. Social Surveys. Surveys of school districts, church parishes or 
rural communities. Credited as partial requirements for an advanced 
degree. Credit 2 to 10. Professor Von Tungeln. 1st and 2d terms. 
As arranged. 

380. Thesis. On special subjects in the field of rural sociology. A 
partial requirement for an advanced degree in rural sociology. Pro- 
fessor Von Tungeln. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Fish, Engineering Annex, Room 207 
510. Advanced Work. In alternating currents, electric power trans- 
mission, electric railways, and characteristics of electrical machinery. 
Credit 3-10. Proper fees will be charged for laboratory work. Professor 
Fish. 1st term. As arranged. 

ENGINEERING 

Dean Marston, Engineering Hall, Room 301. Professor Duckering 

105. Engineering Problems. (Required of all engineers.) Practical 
problems based upon engineering applications of plane trigonometry, 
paralleling and co-operating with the instruction in Math. 2. Prere- 
quisite or classification in Math. 2. Lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 1. 1st term. 
Tu. Th. 9-12. 

106. Engineering: Problems. (Required of all Engineers except agri- 
cultural.) Problems dealing with the analysis of elementary structures; 
direct stresses and design of simple members; instruction in the use of 
the slide-rule. Prerequisite 105. Lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 1. 1st term. 
W. S. 1-4. 

ENGLISH 

Professor Noble, Central Building, Room 18 

40a, 4 0b, 40c. College English. (40a) General principles of composi- 
tion. 1st term. 11:00. (40b) Exposition. 2d term. 2:00. (40c) Narra- 
tion and description. 1st term. 11:00. Rec. 6; credit 3 each term. 

140a, 140b, 140c. College English. (140a) Elements of composition. 
Grammar review. Sentence; paragraph; outlines. 1st term. 11:00. 
(140b) Exposition. 2d term. 2:00. (140c) Narration and description. 
Themes. Rec. 6; credit 3 each term. 1st term. 11:00. 

240a, 240b, 240e. College English. (240a) Grammar review; sentence; 
paragraph; outlines; note-taking. 1st term. 11:00. (240b) Exposition. 
2d term. 2:00. (240c) Description and narration. Study of artistic 
expression. Themes. 1st term. 11:00. Rec. 6; credit 3 each term. 

251. Masterpieces, English. Shakespeare to Wordsworth; the Vic- 
torian period, wilh special attention to one essayist, one poet, one nov- 
elist. Prerequisite 240c. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 3:00. 

430a 430b. Fiction. Recent Important Writers. (430a) American 
Short Story. Rec. 2, 4 or 6. Credit 1. 2 or 3. 2d term. 3:00. (430b) 
Foreign short story. Rec. 2, 4 or 6. Credit 1, 2 or 3. 1st term. 11:00. 

143 and 441. Argumentation. Inductive and deductive argument; 
fallacies; analyzing, abstracting, and classifying arguments on some 
question of present Importance; briefing;; writing forensic Prerequisite 
40c, 140c or 240c. (143) Rec. 4; credit 2. M. Tu. Th. F. 1:00. (441) Rec. 
6j Credit '■'.. 1st term. 1 1 :0ft. 

30 



FARM CROrS AND SOILS 
Professor Stevenson, Agricultural Hall, Room 25 

FARM CROPS GROUP 

CROP PRODUCTION 

151. Com Production. A thorough study of the crop, including the 
growing, harvesting, marketing, and uses of crop. Rec. 6; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; 
credit 4; fee $1.50. 1st term, 1:00, lab. Tu Th. 7-10. 2rl term, 11:00, lab. 
Tu. Th. 7-10. 

152. Small Grain Production. Oats, wheat, barley, and rye; struc- 
ture, adaptations, growing, harvesting, and uses; insects and diseases. 
Rec. 6; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 4; fee $1.50. 1st term, 11:00, lab. W. F. 2-5. 
2d term, 2:00, lab. W. S. 7-10. 

153. Advanced Corn and Small Grain Production. Adaptation, char- 
acteristics, classification and origin of corn and small grain varieties, 
the preparation of materials for exhibition and class room purposes, 
and the exhibiting and judging of corn and small grains. Prerequisites 
151 and 152. Rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 1st term. M. W. 
F. S. 1, lab. W. S. 7-10. 

154. Forage Crop Production. Grasses, legumes and other forage 
plants suitable for pasture, hay, silage and soiling. Prerequisites 151 
and 152. Rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 1st term. M. W. F. S. 8, 
lab. Tu. Th. 2-5. 

160. Summer Course. Study of farm crops in the field under investi- 
gational conditions. Prerequisites 151 and 152. Labs. 6 weeks; credit 
5; fee $5.00. 1st term. As arranged. 

181. Research in Crop Production. Problems of growth, harvesting, 
and storage of cereal crops. Prerequisites 153, 154. Credit 1 to 10 hrs. 
1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

182. Conferences in Crop Production. Reports and discussion of cur- 
rent investigations. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

CROP BREEDING 

281a, 281b, 281c. Research in Crop Breeding. I. Cereal breeding 
II. Forage crop breeding. III. Methods of investigation. Special prob- 
lems. Prerequisite 251. Credit 1 to 10. Professor Hughes. 1st and 2d 
terms. As arranged. 

282. Conferences in Crop Breeding-. Reports and discussions on cur- 
rent investigations. Professor Hughes. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

SOILS GROUP 

SOIL PHYSICS 

151. Soils. Identification, mapping and description of soil types; 
origin and classification. Soil areas, types and problems in Iowa. Rec. 
4; labs. 4, 2 hr.; credit 3V 3 ; fee $2.50. 1st term, M. W. F. S. 10, lab. M. 
W. F. S. 3-5. 2d term, M. W. F. S. 7, lab. M. W. F. S. 10-12. 

SOIL FERTILITY 

251. Soil Fertility. General principles of fertility. Studies on samples 
of soil from the home farm or any other soil. Prerequisite 151, Chem. 
751a or equivalent and Chem. 752 when required in the course of study; 
students in Dairying and in Home Economics and Agriculture Chem. 
752 or 776. Rec. 4; labs. 4, 2 hr.; credit 3%; fee $3.00. 1st and 2d 
terms. M. W. F. S. 8, lab. M. W. F. S. 1-3. 

252. Manures and Fertilizers. Farmyard manure; commercial ferti- 
lizers, incomplete and complete. Influence on soil fertility. Prerequisite 
251. Rec. 4; lab. 4, 2 hr.; credit 3y 3 ; fee $3.00. B (Home Economics). 

.: credit 2. 1st term, M. W. F. S. 7, lab. M. W. F. S. 10-12. 2d 
term, M. W. F. S. 9, lab. M. W. Th. F. 3-5. 

271. Special Problems in Soil Fertility. Experiments dealing with 
the problem of maintaining and increasing the crop producing power 
of soils. Prerequisite 252. Rec. 2; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $3.00. 1st 
term. As arranged. 

281. Research in Soil Fertility. Experiments to test the efficiency of 
certain treatments and the value of fertilizing materials. Credit 1 to 
10; fee $3.00. Professor Brown. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

391. Research in Soil Humus. Study of organic matter in soils; 
classification, decomposition, relation to micro-organisms and produc- 
tivity. Credit 1 to 10; fee $3.00. Professor Brown, Associate Professor 
Johnson. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

31 



SOIL BACTERIOLOGY 
381. Research in Soil Bacteriology. (Bact. 381.) Field, greenhouse 
or laboratory experiments on bacterial activities in The soil. Credit 1 
to 10; fee $3.00. Professor Brown, Assistant Professor Emerson. 1st 
and 2d terms. As arranged. 

SOIL MANAGEMENT 
481. Research in Soil Management. Soil management under live stock, 
grain, mixed or truck systems of farming. Credit 1 to 10. Professor 
Stevenson. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

Professor Nourse, Office, Room 315, Agricultural Hall 
(For work in Farm Management, see Economic Science, page 29.) 

FORESTRY 

Professor Beach, Agricultural Hall, Room 201 
Professor MacDonald, Agricultural Hall, Room 229 

Summer School work in Forestry is offered during both terms of the 
Summer Session. Courses 76, 77, 78 and 79 are open only to technical 
Forestry students of this institution or other colleges or to students 
giving evidence from former training or experience that they are 
qualified to handle the work. 

Courses 91, 92 and 93a are advanced courses open to graduate students 
and to undergraduates desiring additional elective credit in the subject. 

The entire Summer Session work in Forestry is of a very practical 
nature, the purpose being to give the students practical training and 
experience in the various lines of forestry work. Field investigations 
make up the major portion of the work. The 1919 summer camp was 
established on the Arapahoe National Forest in Colorado, the 1920 camp 
in Gallatin National Forest, Montana; the 1921 camp in Minnesota. The 
1922 camp will be either in Colorado or Minnesota. 

76. Applied Lumbering. A detailed study of logging and milling 
operations in an important forest region. 

Summer Forestry Camp. Field work, 10, 3 hr. periods. Credit 5. 
2d term. 

77. Camp Technique. Personal equipment for camp life; ration lists 
for trips; useful knots, packing hitches and emergency equipment. 

Summer Camp. Credit 3. 2d term. 

78. Forest Mensuration. Field practice in scaling logs, estimating 
timber and preparing various forest maps. 

Summer Camp. Field work 10, 3 hr. periods. Credit 5. 1st term. 

79. Field Silviculture. Field studies of forest types, natural repro- 
duction, improvement cuttings, marketing timber for cutting under vari- 
ous silvicultural systems. 

Summer Camp. Field work, 10, 3 hr. periods. Credit 5. 1st term. 

91. Advanced Forest Management. Special problems in the regulation 
of yield in the forest. Construction of working plana. Prerequisite 84. 

Summer Camp. Field work 10, 3 hr. periods. Credit 5. 1st and 2d 
terms. 

92. Advanced Planting. Detailed studies of forest nurseries.. Special 
problems in timber planting and reforestation work. Prerequisite 75. 

Summer Camp. Rec. 4; field 6, 3 hr.; credit 5. 1st and 2d terms. 
93a. Forestry Research. Special lines of investigation selected by 
the student in consultation with the Forestry faculty. 

Summer Camp. Field work. Credit 2 to 6. 1st and 2d terms. 

GEOIvOGY 

Professor Beyer, Chemistry Building, Room 299 
350, Summer Field Work. Required of students majoring in geology. 
Topographic and geologic mapping and economic work. Six weeks; 
credit '■>. 1st. term. Summer Camp. 

450. Tin-Mis. Special work in economic geology, petrology, dynamic 
geology, structural geology, metamorphism, historical geology, or strati- 
graphic geology. Credit 5. Professor Beyer, Associate Professor Galpin. 
/: t term. As arranged. 

32 



510. Advanced Agricultural Geology. Work continued through 3 to 
9 quarters. Credit 3 to 10 per quarter as arranged. Fee $1.00 to $3.00 
per quarter. Professor Beyer. 1st term. As arranged. 

520. Advanced Mining- Geology • Work continued through 3 to 9 
quarters. Credit 3 to 10 per quarter as arranged. Professor Beyer, 
Associate Professor Galpin. 1st term. As arranged. 

HISTORY 

Professor Cessna, Central Building, Room 212 

Professor Schmidt, Central Building, Room 207 

Assistant Professor Moore 

124. Economic History of American Agriculture. Colonial founda- 
tions; westward movement of pioneer and planter; agrarian revolution, 
reorganization. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 11:00. 

214. American Government. Federal system; structure, functions, 
and powers of the national, state, and local governments; political 
parties; citizen's rights and duties. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 2:00. 

320. Research in Economic History. Selected topics in European, 
Latin, American, United States, and Iowa history. Preferences of stu- 
dents will be considered in the assignment of topics. Credit 3 to 8. 
1st term. As arranged. 

Note 

Students desiring four hours' credit in History 214 may register in 
this course as scheduled for the three-hour credit, with the privilege 
of making up the additional hour by assigned readings in the Library. 

Students desiring credit in History 110 may take History 124 as a 
substitute. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Professor Walls, Home Economics Building, Room 105 
HOME ECONOMICS VOCATIONAL. EDUCATION 

122. Teaching- Home Economics. Summer adaptation of special 
methods features of 126a. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 8:00. 

525. Study of High School Home Economics. The present high school 
product, standard, units, means of improvement. Hours as arranged; 
credit 3 to 5. Associate Professor Miller. 1st term. 8:00. 

APPLIED ART 

130a. Elementary Design. Fundamental design principles.' Rec. 2; 
labs. 6, 2 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 1st term. Tu. F. 7, lab. M. W. Th. 7-9, 
Tu. F. 8-11. 

130b. Design. Prerequisite 130a. Rec. 2; labs. 6, 2 hr.; credit 3; fee 
$2.00. 1st term. M. W. 1, lab. M. W. F. 2-4, Tu. Th. 1-4. 

133a. Elementary Costume Design. Prerequisite 240b or 241a, 130b. 
Rec. 2; labs. 6; 2 hr.; credit 3; fee $3.50. 1st term. M. W. 9, lab. 10-12 
daily. 

139. House Planning. Prerequisite 130b. Rec. 2; labs. 6, 2 hr.; credit 
3; fee $2.00. 1st term. Tu. Th. 2, lab. 8-10. 

530. Research in Applied Art. Credits and hours as arranged. Fee 
$1.00 per credit. 1st term. As arranged. 

HOUSEHOLD ART 

240a. Garment Construction. Development of technique and labora- 
tory methods. Rec. 2; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.50. 1st term, Th. 
S. 1, lab. M. Tu. W. F. 1-4. 2d term, M. F. 11, lab. Tu. W. Th. S. 9-12. 

241a. Garment Construction. Covers subject-matter of 240a and 240b. 
Prerequisite, 1 unit of sewing in an accredited high school. Rec. 2; 
labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.50. 1st term. Tu. F. 11, M. W. Th. S. 9-12. 

241c, 241 d. Garment Construction. (241c) Prerequisites 241a or 240b, 
130a. (241d) Wool problem. Prerequisites 24lc, 133a. Rec. 2; labs. 4, 
3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.50 each. 241c. 1st and 2d terms. W. S. 1, M. Tu. 
Th. F. 1-4. 241d. 1st term. Tu. Th. 10, lab. M. W. F. S. 8-11. 

242a. Applied Dress Design. Prerequisite 241d. Rec. 2; labs. 4, 3 hr.; 
credit 3; fee $3.00. 1st term. Tu. S. 1, M. W. Th. F. 1-4. 

243a. Millinery. Prerequisites 241a, 130b. Rec. 2; labs. 4, 3 hr.; 
credit 3; fee $3.00. 1st term. W. S. 1, lab. M. Tu. Th. F. 1-4. 

33 



247. Sewing Course for Teachers. Prerequisite 241a or equivalent. 
Rec. 2; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. Assistant Professor Cook. 1st 
term. W. S. 11, lab. M. Tu. Th. F. 9-12. 

540. Research in Household Art. Credit and hours as arranged.- Fee 
$1.00 per credit hour. 1st term. As arranged. 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

350a. Food Preparation. Rec. 2; labs. 4, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee $5.50. 1st 
term. M. F. 9, Tu. W. Th. S. 8-11. 

351a. Food Preparation. Prereuuisite 1 unit of food work in an ac- 
credited high school. Rec. 2; labs. 4, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee $5.50. 2d term. 
W. 11, S. 8, M. Tu. Th. F. 9-12. 

352a. Nutrition and Dietetics. Prerequisite Chem. 802, H. Ec. 471. 
Chem. 802 not required of H. Ec. and Ag. students. Rec. 4; labs. 4, 3 hr.; 
credit 4; fee $5.50. Professor Busse, Associate Professor Lowe. 1st 
term, Tu. W. Th. F. 8, lab. Tu. W. Th. F. 9-12. 2d term, Tu. W. Th. F. 8, 
M. W. F. 1-4, S. 9-12. 

353. Nutrition and Dietetics. Seminar. Prerequisite 352a. Rec. 4; 
credit 2. Professor E. Miller. 2d term. As arranged. 

354. Nutrition and Dietetics. Prerequisite 352a. Hours arranged; 
credit 2 to 6. Professor Busse. 1st term. As arranged. 

355. Meal Planning,-. Prerequisite 352a. Rec. 2; laos. 4, 3 hr. ; credit 
3; fee $5.50. Associate Professor Bailey. 1st term. M. S. 11, lab. Tu. 
W. Th. F. 10-1. 

356a. Experimental Cooking-. Prerequisite Chem. 776, H. Ec. 350b or 
351a. Rec. 2; labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $5.50. Assistant. Professor 
Lowe. 1st term. M. S. 1, Tu. W. Th. F. 1-4. 

357a. Institutional Foods. Prerequisite 350b or 351a. Rec. 2; labs. 
4, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $5.50. 1st term. M. S. 11, Tu. W. Th. F. 10-1. 

510. Literature of Home Economics. Graduate course. Hours as 
arranged; lect. 6; credit 3. Professor Busse. 2d term. As arranged. 

550. Research in Household Science. Credit and hours as arranged. 
1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

HOUSEHOLD MANAGEMENT 

470a. Household Management. Prerequisites Ec. Sci. 50 and 230; for 
H. Ec and Ag;. students. Ec. Sci. 50. Rec. 6; credit 3. Associate Pro- 
fessor Murphy. 1st term. 8:00. 

470b. Practice House. At periods arranged during the year senior 
students will spend scheduled time in the practice house. Prerequisite 
or classification in 470a. Students preparing to teach Vocational Home 
Economics under the Smith-Hughes Act will be required to spend a 
longer period. 1st term. As arranged. 

471. Food Marketing-. Prerequisite 350b or 351a. Rec. 2; labs. 4, 
3 hr.; credit 3; fee $5.00. 1st term. Tu. Th. 9, lab. M. Tu. Th. F. 1-4. 

472a. Textile Buying. Prerequisite 241d. Rec. 4; credit 2; fee $1.00. 
1st term. Tu. W. Th. F. 8:00 

472b. Textile Buying-; Seminar. Prerequisite 472a. Hours arranged; 
credit 4-6. Professor Brandt. 2d term. As arranged. 

HORTICULTURE 

Professor Beach, Agricultural Hall, Room 201 

71 A. Genera] Horticulture. Lect. 6; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 4; fee $1.00. 
1st term. 8:00, lab. Tu. Th. 2-5. 

75. Plant Propagation. Prerequisites Bot. 200 and Hort. 71; for stu- 
dents in AgTic. ;ind Manual Training, Hort. 71. Luct. 4; lab. 2, ;J hr.] 
credit 3; fee $1.00. 2d term. M. W. F. S. 8, lab. Tu. Th. 2-5. 

78. Research. Special topics for minor or major graduate work per- 
taining to genera] horticulture or plant breeding. May be presented 
in form of thesis. Credit 1 to 8. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

163. Grapes and Smnii Fmifs. Prerequisite 71, 72 or 75. Lect. 6; 
la I,. 2, .", hr.; credit 4. 1st. term. 7:00, lab. M. W. 1-4 or 2-5. 

178. Research, Special investigation in pomology for major or minor 
graduate work. May be presented in form of thesis. Credit 1 to 8. 
1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

278. iU'.s<';ir«-h. Special Investigation for major or minor graduate 
work. May la presented in form of thesis. Credit 1 to 8. 1st and 2d 

terms. As arranged. 



34 






365b. Vegetable Crops. Lectures 4; Roe. 2; credit 2. 2d term. M. 
Tu. Th. P. 9:00. 

369. Vegetable Growing. Lect. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3. 2d term. 
M. Tu. Th. F. 9, lab. M. W. F. 2-4. 

378. Research. Special investigation in truck crops and market gar- 
dening, for major or minor graduate work. May be presented in form 
of thesis. Credit 1 to 8. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

HYGIENE 

Professor Edwards. College Hospital 

II. School Sanitation and Hygiene. 'For graduates. Required of all 
candidates for advanced degrees in Vocational Education. Credited as 
major work for such students. Lect. 4; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3. 1st 
term. M. Tu. W. Th. 10, lab. as arranged. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor Smith, Central Building, Room 218 

1. College Algebra. About one-sixth of the course is devoted to a 
review of Algebra up to and including quadratics followed by the usual 
topics of College Algebra. Rec. 10; credit 5. 1st term. 7:00 and M. Tu. 
Th. F. 2:00. 

la. Algebra (one-half time). This course covers the work taken up 
during the first part of College Algebra and is devoted to a review of 
the fundamental principles of Algebra up to and including quadratic 
equations. It is an excellent preparation for any student planning to 
enter college from a non-accredited high school and the record will be 
taken in lieu of the entrance examination in mathematics for such stu- 
dents. For those who have been out of high school for a number of 
years and need review or for teachers desiring to take examinations 
for certificates, it will prove a very desirable course. It should not 
be taken by those who have not had at least a year in algebra in high 
school, or its equivalent. Rec. 5. 1st term. M. Tu. W. Th. F. 8. 

No college credit given. 

2. Plane Trigonometry. Prerequisite 1; Rec. 8; credit 4. 1st term. 
Must be accompanied by Engr. 105. 8:00 and Tu. Th. 2. 

3. Plane Analytical Geometry. Prerequisite 2; rec. 10; credit 5. 1st 
term. 7:00 and M. Tu. Th. F. 2. 

5a, 5b. 5c. Calculus. Differential and Integral. Prerequisite 3; rec. 
10; credit 5. 5a, 7:00 and M. Tu. Th. F. 2; 5b, 7:00 and M. Tu. Th. F. 2; 
5c, 8:00 and M. Tu. Th. F. 2. 1st term. 5b, 5c, 2d term. 8 and 2 (except 
Saturday). 

36. Solid Geometry. Prerequisite Plane Geometry. Rec. 6; credit 3. 
1st term. 8:00. 

122. Teaching Vocational Mathematics. Rec. 4; observation teaching 
2; credit 3. 1st term. 9:00 and observation on M. Tu. W. Th. at 7, 8 or 11. 

Note 

Advanced work will be offered in one or more of the following sub- 
jects regularly given during the college year: Theory of Equations, 
Analytical Geometry of Three Dimensions, Differential Equations, Func- 
tions of a Complex Variable, Statistical Methods and Vector Analysis. 
Persons wishing advanced courses should notify the department before 
the opening of the session. 

MECHANICAL. ENGINEERING 

Professor Meeker, Engineering Hall, Room 202 

III. Mechanical Drawing. Use of drawing instruments, practice in 
lettering, detailing and tracing. Labs. 4, 3 hr. ; credit 2. 1st term. 
As arranged, 8-12 or 1-5, except Saturday. 

151. Projective Drawing. Projection of the point, line, and plane 
as applied in the preparation of general and detail engineering draw- 
ings. Prerequisite 111. Rec. 2; lab. 4, 3 hr.; credit 3. 1st term. M. W. 
11, lab., as arranged, 8-12 or 1-5. 

171. Working Drawing. Interpretation and reading of orthographic 
and pictorial sketches of machine details and assemblies; preparation 
of working drawings. Prerequisite 151. Lab. 4, 3 hr.; credit 2. 1st 
term. As arranged, 8-12, 1-5, except Saturday. 

173. Elementary Pattern Work. Simple patterns and core boxes for 
cast iron, brass and aluminum castings. Prerequisite 143. Lab. 4, 3 hr.; 
credit 2; fee $4.00. 1st term. As arranged, 8-12 or 1-5, except Saturday. 

35 



211. Detail Drawings. Orthographic and pictorial sketching of 
machines; preparation of shop drawings, lettering, tracing and blue 
printing. Prerequisite 171. Labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 2. 1st term. 8-12, 
1-5, except Saturday. 

213. Advanced Pattern Work. Special pattern work; gearing, sweep 
and molding machine work. Prerequisite 173. Labs. 4, 3 hr. ; credit 2; 
fee $3.00. 1st term. 8-12, 1-5, except Saturday. 

241. Mechanisms. Study of mechanisms, cams, and linkages; location 
of virtual centers, construction of velocity and acceleration diagrams. 
Prerequisite 211, or 171 or equivalent. Labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 2. 1st term. 
8-12, 1-5, except Saturday. 

271. Jig Design. General and detail drawings of jigs and fixtures. 
Prerequisite 241. Lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 1. 1st term. 8-12, 1-5, except 
Saturday. 

272. Statics of Engineering. Principles of pure mechanics; statics 
of rigid bodies and flexible cords; center of gravity and moment of 
inertia. Prerequisite Math. 5b. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 10:00. 

313. Machine Work. Chipping, filing, scraping, babbitting, and fitting 
bearings; mill wrighting; plain turning and thread cutting. Labs. 4, 
3 hr.; credit 2; fee $3.00. 1st and 2d terms. 8-12, 1-5, except Saturday. 

343. Machine Work. Operation and management of boring mills, 
millers and planer; repairing and building machines and machine parts. 
Prerequisite 313. Labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 2. 1st and 2d terms. 8-12, 1-5, 
except Saturday. 

373. Machine Work. Use of lathe, miller, and grinding machine in 
making cutters, taps, and special tools. Prerequisite 34 3. Labs. 4, 3 hr.; 
credit 2. 1st and 2d terms. Lab., as arranged, 8-12, 1-5, except Saturday. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

Professor De Vries, Central Building, Room 120 

110a. Elementary French. The principles of pronounciation; gram- 
mar; reading of modern prose. Rec. 8; credit 4. 1st term. '7:00 and 
2 hrs. as arranged. 

145a. Reading Knowledge of French. Review of grammar followed 
by selected readings in chemical and physical subjects. Rec. 8; credit 4. 
1st term. 8:00 and 2 hrs. as arranged. 

210a. Elementary Spanish. Grammar, reading, composition and con- 
versation. Rec. 8; credit 4. 1st term. 9:00 and 2 nrs. as arranged. 

445a, 445b. Reading Knowledge of German. Review of grammar fol- 
lowed by selected readings in chemical and physical subjects. Rec. 8; 
credit 4. 1st term. (445a) 7:00 and 2 hrs. as arranged. (445b) 10:00 
and 2 hrs. as arranged. 

MUSIC 

Professor MacRae, Music Hall 
Members of the Summer Session and others desiring instruction in 
music will be offered courses in Voice, Piano, Cello and Band Instru- 
ments during the first term of the Summer Session. Extra fees are 
charged for these lessons and must be arranged for with the Head of 
the Department of Music. Fees are payable in advance at the Treasurer's 
office. 

One Voice lesson per week $12.50 

Two Voice lessons per week 25.00 

One Piano lesson per week 10.00 

Two Piano lessons per week 20.00 

One Cello lesson per week 10.00 

Two Cello lessons per week 20.00 

Band Instruments — 

One lesson per week 10.00 

Two lessons per week 20.00 

The practice pianos <>f the Departmenl of Music will be at the disposal 

of the students at the following rates: One hour a day for the term $1.50. 

These are the regular rates charged in this Department during the 

college year. For further details address Tolbert MacRae, Head of 

Department of Music. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Vor Women) 
Professor Tilden, Woman's Gymnasium 
200. Swimming, [nstruction for beginners only. Labs. 6, 1 hr.; fee 
$2.00. 1st term. 4:00 or 5:00. 



36 






201. Diving mid Life Saving. Labs. 6, 1 hr.; fee $2.00. 1st term. 3:00. 
Swimming pool open afternoons for all who can swim. Those who 

take only swimming- in Summer School will be charged only the $2.00 
registration fee. Regulation suits required. 

202. Folk Dancing ami Games. Labs. 4, 1 hr. ; fee $3.00. 1st term. 
Tu. \V. Th. F. 4:00. 

203. Aesthetic Dancing. Labs. 4, 1 hr.; fee $1.50. 1st term. Tu. W. 
Th. F. 4. 

204. Theory and Practice of Coaching. Lab. 6, 1 hr.; fee $1.50. 1st 
term. Daily at 5. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING (For Men) 

Professor Mayser, Men's Gymnasium 

The playgrounds, tennis courts, handball courts, tracks, baseball 
diamonds, and gymnasium equipment of the gymnasium are at the 
service of men in attendance during the Summer Session. The swimming 
pool will be open from 2 to 6 P. M. daily under the supervision of a 
competent instructor in swimming and life saving methods. Locker 
assignments may be secured at the gymnasium office. 

10a. Physical Training. Personal Hygiene. Floor Tactics. Calis- 
thenics. Gymnastics. Swimming. Outdoor and Indoor Games and 
Athletics. First Aid. Labs. 4, 1 hr.; fee $1.00. 1st term. M. Tu. W. 
Th. 11. 

11a. Physical Training. Advanced work. Prerequisite 10c. Lab. 2, 
1 hr.; fee $1.00. 1st term. M. W. 11. 

12a. Football Coaching and Officiating. Instruction and laboratory 
work. Labs. 6, 2 hr.; credit. 2; fee $1.00. 1st term. 8-10. 

12b. Basketball, Wrestling, Gymnastics, and Swimming, Coaching 
and Officiating. Instruction and laboratory work. Labs. 6, 2 hr. ; credit 
2; fee $1.00. 1st term. 10-12. 

12c. Track, Coaching and Officiating. Instruction and laboratory 
work. Labs. 6, 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.00. 1st term. 8-10. 

PHYSICS 

Professor Spinney, Engineering Hall, Room 212 

101. Mechanics and Heat. Fundamental principles and their appli- 
cations. Prerequisite Math. 2 or 13. Lect. 4; rec. 2; credit 3; fee $1.00. 
1st term. 2:00. 

106B. General Physics. Mechanics, heat, light, sound, electricity and 
applications. Lect. and rec. 6; credit 3. 1st and 2d terms. 8:00. 

*202. Mechanics and Heat. Force, work, energy, and power. Pre- 
requisite Math. 2. Lect. and rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $1.50. 
1st and 2d terms. 8 and 1, lab. 9-12. 

♦203. Electricity. Prerequisite 202. Lect. and rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; 
credit 3 ; fee $1.50. 1st and 2d terms. 8 and 1, lab. 9-12. 

*204. Sound and Light. Prerequisite 203. Lect. and rec. 4; lab. 2, 
3 hr.; credit 3; fee $1.50. 1st and 2d terms. 8 and 1, lab. 9-12. 

208. Mechanics and Heat. Prerequisite Math. 2. Lect. 4; rec. 4; 
lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 5; fee $1.50. 1st term. M. W. F. S. 9, and M. Tu. 
Th. F. 3, Tu. Th. 9-12. 

210. Sound and Light. Prerequisite 209. Lect. 4; rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; 
credit 5; fee $1.50. 1st term. M. W. F. S. 11, and M. Tu. Th. F. 3, Tu. 
Th. 9-12. 

444. Research. Professor Woodrow. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Cessna, Central Building, Room 212 

1. Ceneral Psychology. Study of the normal adult human mind. Rec. 
10; credit 5. 1st term, 8:00 and M. Tu. W. F. 4. 2d term, 11:00 and 
M. Tu. Th. F. 4:00. 

14. Mental Tests. Their application in vocational and industrial 
guidance and selection. Very important for teachers, employers, and 
vocational counselors. Prerequisite 1 or 5. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 
2:00. 



*\ote. — The three courses, 2.02, 203, and 204 combined, meet the re- 
quirements for the first grade certificate credit. 

37 



20. Educational Psychology. A treatment of special phases of Gen- 
eral and Genetic Psychology which are most applicable to education. 
Rec. 8; credit 4. 2d term. M. T. W. Th. F. 9, Sat. 8. 

25. Childhood and Adolescence. Characteristics of childhood; critical 
changes of early adolescence. Suggestions for parents, study clubs, and 
parent-teacher associations. Rec. 6: credit 3. 1st term. 11:00. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Professor Shattuck, Central Building, Room 311 V 2 

22. The Fundamentals of Public Speaking. Attention is especially 
given to voice building and expression. Rec. 4; credit 2. 1st term, 
M. Tu. Th. F. 10:00. 2d term, Tu. W. Th. F. 7:00. 

23. Interpretation. Methods of vocal interpretation, criticism, and 
delivery. Each student is instructed privately at stated intervals 
throughout the quarter. Rec. 6, credit 3. 1st and 2d terms. 7:00. 

30. Extempore Speech. The fundamental principles of speech or- 
ganization and delivery. Rec. 4 or 6; credit 2 or 3. 1st term, 8 or 11. 
2d term, 8:00. 

31. Extempore Speech. Prerequisite 30. Rec. 4 or 6, credit 2 or 3. 
1st term. 11:00. 

RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Von Tungeln, Agricultural Hall, Room 316 
(For work in Rural Sociology, see Economic Science, page 29.) 

SOILS 

(SUB-DEPARTMENT OF FARM CROPS AND SOILS) 
(For description of studies, see page 31.) 

TRADES AND INDUSTRIES 

Professor Shane, Transportation Building, Room 202 

1. Vocational Drawing. Elementary mechanical drawing for voca- 
tional teachers. Labs. 4, 3 hrs.; credit 2. 1st and 2d terms. Lab. 8-11. 

2. Advanced Vocational Drawing. Drawing and methods of presenta- 
tion and outlining of drawing courses for vocational schools. Prere- 
quisite 1 or equivalent. Labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 2. 1st and 2d terms. 1-4. 

10. Electric Wiring. A practical course in the wiring of dwellings 
and buildings for light and power, including a study of code rules. Labs. 
4, 3 hr.; credit 2. 1st and 2d terms. Tu. Th. F. S. 2-5. 

14. Studies in Elementary Shopwork. Shop organization, wood tech- 
nology courses of study, tools and equipment. The object is to furnish 
a foundation for teaching Junior High School shopwork. Prerequisite, 
preceded or accompanied by 23. Lect. and rec. 6; credit 3. 1st and 2d 
terms. 11:00. 

16. Auto Mechanics for Vocational Teachers. Two parts of six weeks 
each covering general engine operation and repair, chassis repair and 
special instruction in lighting, starting and ignition. Students may be 
allowed to take one other study. Lect. and rec. 6; lab. 6, 3 hr.; credit 6; 
fee $5.00 for each part of the course. 1st and 2d terms. 8:00, lab. 2-5. 

18. Furniture Making. Emphasis on principles of good construction, 
proportion of parts, inlaying and turning as decorative features. Pre- 
requisites 23 and 26 or equivalent. Labs. 6, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $5.00- 
1st and 2d terms. 8-11. 

23. Elementary Woodwork. Care and adjustment of tools; principles 
of planing, squaring 1 and laying out work. Labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee 
$5.00. 1st and 2d terms. 2-5. 

26. Advanced Woodwork. Continuation of 23, care and adjustment 
of power tools; cabinet making and joinery. Labs. 6, 3 hr.; credit 3; 
fee $5.00. 1st and 2d terms. 8-11. 

27. Building Construction. Elements of carpentry and building, prin- 
ciples of design and construction. Labs. 6, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee $5.00. 
1st and 2d terms. 8-11. 

4 0. Trade Analysis. The field covered by the various trades, includ- 
ing the most efficient methods of training for preparing men to follow 
these trades. Prerequisites Voc. Ed. 51 and 143. Rec. and lect. 6; credit 
3. 1st and 2d terms. 4:00. 

38 



VETERINARY ANATOMY 

Professor Murphey, Anatomy Building, Veterinary Group, Room 117 

713. Research in Anatomy. Problems relating to Animal Husbandry, 
Physiology, Pathology, and Surgery. Anatomical problems of systemic, 
topographic, or comparative nature. Labs. 6 or 8; credit 3 or 4. Pro- 
fessor Murphey. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

714. Research in Microscopic Anatomy. Physiological histology; 
problems of importance to pathology or those relating to histogenesis 
or morphology. Credit 3-8 as arranged. Professor Murphey. 1st and 
2d terms. As arranged. 

VETERINARY FATHOIX)GY 

Professor Benbrook, Pathology Building, Veterinary Group, Room 113 

715. Research in Pathology. (For students of the Graduate College.) 
Prerequisite 310 or equivalent. Professor Benbrook. 1st term. As 
arranged. 

716. Research in Hacteriology. (For students of the Graduate Col- 
lege.) Prerequisite 220 or equivalent. Professor Murray, Associate 
Professor Rice. 1st term. As arranged. 

VETERINARY PHYSIOLOGY AND FHARMOCOLOGY 

Professor Bergman, Physiology Building, Veterinary Group, Room 100 
715. Research in Physiology. Research in physiological subjects rela- 
tive to veterinary science. Professor Bergman. 1st term. As arranged. 

VETERINARY SURGERY 

Professor Bemis, Administration Building, Veterinary Group, Room 108 

717. Research in Surgery. Special problems connected with surgical 
conditions, surgical technique, and sterility of animals. Labs. 4 or 6, 
3 hr. ; credit 2 or 3. Professor Bemis. 1st term. As arranged. 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

Professor Wilson, Agricultural Hall, Room 318 

51. Methods of Teaching Vocational Subjects. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st 
term, 8:00 or 11:00. 2d term, 9:00. 

52. High School Problems. Organization, management, and prob- 
lems of the present day high school particularly of the vocational type. 
Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term, 7:00. 2d term, 1:00. 

53. The Industrial High School. Sources and development of the high 
school curriculum, with particular reference to the industrial and voca- 
tional subjects. Rec. 6; credit 3. 2d term. 7:00. 

54. Principles of Vocational Education. Fundamental principles, aims 
and values in education applied to vocational subjects. Rec. 6; credit 
3. 2d term. 10:00. 

55. History of Industrial and Vocational Education. Chief emphasis 
upon the modern movement. Rec. 6; credit 3. 2d term. 8:00. 

57. Vocational Education. Development and present best practice, 
pre-vocational education, and vocational guidance. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st 
term. 10:00 or 1:00. 

58. Rural Education. With particular reference to the interests of 
the county superintendents, the normal training teacher, and the super- 
intendent or teacher in the consolidated or village school. Rec. 6; 
credit 3. 1st term. 2:00. 

109. School Administration and Supervision. Modern methods for the 
teacher of agriculture, who is constantly being used in the consolidated 
and smaller town systems of the state as principal or superintendent. 
Prerequisite 51; rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 9:00. 

120. Research in Education. Problems for the advanced student, 
(a) Organization of Secondary Courses in Agriculture on a problem or 
vocational basis, and adapted to local conditions. (b) Vocational and 
Industrial Surveys. Hours by appointment. 1st and 2d terms. As ar- 
ranged. 

122. (H. Ec. 122.) Teaching Home Economics. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st 
term. 8:00. 

131a. Teaching Vocational Agriculture. Courses of study; lesson 
plans; equipment, text books, observation, and supervised teaching. 
Prerequisites 51 and 52, and agriculture equal to that required for the 

39 



completion of the Junior year in some agricultural course. Rec. 4; 
labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3. 1st term. 3:00. 

131d. Teaching- General Agriculture. Prerequisite 51 and 52 or equiv- 
alent. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 4:00. 

142a, 142b, 142c. Teaching Trades and Industries. Summer adaptation 
of the special methods part of 141a, 141b, 141c. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st 
term. 1:00. 

525. Study of High School Home Economics. The present high school 
product, standard units, means of improvement, etc. 1st term. 8:00. 

ZOOLOGY, ENTOMOLOGY AND APICULTURE 

Professor Guthrie, Science Building, Room 313 

101a, 101b, 101c. General Physiology. Anatomical and morphological 
features of the organs; physiology of nerve and muscle systems; special 
senses; reproduction; growth. Practical mammalian dissection and ex- 
periments. (For Home Economics students and others desiring funda- 
mental training in the science.) .Prerequisite Chem. 77 1 or classification 
in 776. Lect. 6; labs. 3, 3 hr. ; credit 4%; fee $3.00 each term. 101a and 
one-half 101b, 1st term, 1:00, lab. M. W. F. 2-5. Second half of 101b and 
101c, 2d term, 1:00, lab. M. W. F. 2-5. 

180. Elementary Research in Physiology. Applied physiology for 
advanced undergraduates and graduates. Individual problems to begin 
research and find the literature. Prerequisites 101, and 110 or 111, 
preferably both. Conferences and assignment. Credit 1 to 3 as ar- 
ranged. Professor Baldwin. 1st term. As arranged. 

181. Advanced Research in Physiology. For graduates. Investiga- 
tion in some physiological subject suitable for a thesis. As arranged. 
Professor Baldwin. 1st term. As arranged. 

380. Research. In Economic Entomology. Hours and credits to be 
arranged. A. For undergraduates. B. For graduate students. Asso- 
ciate Professors Paddock, Fenton. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

406. Elementary Apiculture. The fundamentals necessary to the suc- 
cessful management of a few colonies are given. Rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; 
credit 3; fee $3.00. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

408. Methods of Apiary Practice. Sources of nectar and pollen, sup- 
plies and apparatus. Prerequisite 407. Rec. 4; lab. 1, 3 hr.; credit 3; 
fee $3.00. Associate Professor Paddock. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

480. Research in Apiculture. Hours and credits to be arranged. 
Associate Professor Paddock. 1st. and 2d terms. As arranged. 



NON-COLLEGIATE AND GENERAL INSTRUCTION 

The Iowa State College offers in the Summer Session, as during 
the regular year, courses of a non-collegiate grade to help groups 
who are particularly interested in the special lines of work offered 
by the College. 

During the summer these consist of courses for mature students 
and special courses in agriculture and trades and industries for 
government students. These courses are described briefly below. 
In addition to these attention is called to the specialized work for 
federal aid students given under the name of Agriculture N6, Prac- 
tical Project. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Any student desiring to enter a non-collegiate course must be at 
least seventeen years of age and must present a certificate signed 
by bis county or liigb school superintendent showing that he has 
satisfactorily completed the eighth grade of the public schools or its 
equivalent, [f the applicanl has attended high school, this certificate 
must also give bis complete high school or academic record. All 
applications for admission should be addressed to the Registrar, Iowa 

40 






State College, who will furnish the proper blanks. These certificates 
should be filed with the Registrar as promptly as possible, and at 
least two weeks before the opening of the quarter. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Associate Professor Turner, Agricultural Engineering Hall, Room 203 

N61. F'org-e Shop. Forging and welding iron and steel. Making, 
hardening and tempering small tools. Designed to be helpful in repair 
of farm equipment. Labs. 4, 3 hr.; credit 2; fee $3.00. 2d term. M. Tu. 
W. Th. 9-12. 

N52. Carpentry Shop. Use, care, and sharpening of carpentry tools. 
Joining, framing, and rafter cutting. Designed to be helpful in farm 
building, planning and construction. Labs. 4, 3 hr. ; credit 2; fee $5.00. 
1st term. Tu. W. Th. F. 1-4. 

N64. Practical Farm Mechanics. Plan and equipment of a farm shop; 
use of farm shop tools in the repair and maintenance of farm equip- 
ment. Labs. 4, 3 hr. ; credit 2; fee $3.00. 1st term. M. W. F. S. 9-12. 

XT'.'. Farm Buildings and Equipment. Plans, building materials, and 
construction; lighting, heating, ventilation, water supply and sewage 
disposal. Rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $1.00. 1st term. M. Tu. W. 
Th. 11, M. F. 1-4. 

N61. Gas Engine and Tractors. Construction, operation, adjustment, 
and care of gas engines and tractors. Prerequisite NG0. Rec. 2; lab. 2, 
3 hr.; credit 2; fee $2.00. 2d term. M. Tu. 8, lab. M. T. 1-4. 

AGRICULTURE 

X6. At this time there is a demand for very specialized training along 
certain lines, such as poultry raising, beekeeping, fruit growing, meat 
cutting and others. This demand comes largely from students disabled 
in war service, and who, at Government expense are being taught a 
new vocation. 

Through the medium of this project, highly specialized and practical 
work may be given. This work may be extended over a number of 
quarters provided a designating letter follows — thus, Ag. N6a, Ag. N6b 
poultry, Ag. N6c poultry represents three quarters work. Where such 
a project is arranged for in advance, and where all records are carefully 
kept and a full report made, credit varying from one to ten hours, will 
-ranted. Where the student is carrying on such a project or practical 
work at this institution under the dierction of an instructor a laboratory 
fee not to exceed $7.50 per summer term may be charged. 1st and 2d 
terms. As arranged. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Professor La Grange, Agricultural Hall, Room 105 
N101. Types and Market Classes of Beef and Oua'-Purpose Cattle. 

Judging; study of types, carcasses, markets, and market classifications. 
Rec. and labs. 4, 2 hr.; credit 2; fee $1.00. 1st term. M. W. F. S. 10-12. 

XI 11. Breeds of Beef and Dual-Purpose Cattle. Judging representa- 
tives of different breeds; origin, history, type, and adaptability of the 
breeds. Prerequisite N101. Rec. 4; labs. 4, 2 hr.; credit 3V 3 ; fee $1.00. 
rm. M. Tu. W. Th. 7. lab. M. Tu. W. Th. 10-12. 

X223. Feeding; and Management of Beef Cattle and Hogs. Pre- 
requisite N222. Rec. 4; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $2.00. 1st term. 
Tu. Th. 10, F. S. 9, lab. M. F. 1-3. 

N231. Feeding- and Marketing- of Horses. Problems. Prerequisites 
X224. Ree. 2; credit 1. 1st term. M. Tu. 8. 

X232. Beef Production and Marketing-. Prerequisite N223. Rec. 2; 
credit 1. 1st term. W. Th. 8. 

N233. Pork Production and 3Iarkcting. Prerequisite N223. Rec. 2; 
credit 1. 1st term. F. S. 8. 

NT234. Mutton and Wool Production and Marketing-. 2d vear. Pre- 
requisites X222, X224. Rec. 2; credit 1. 1st term. M. F. 10. 

BOTANY 

Professor Cunningham, Agricultural Engineering Hall,' Room 301 
XI 00b. Agricultural Botany. Life history of the plant as related to 
■•ulture. Rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $1.00. 1st term. Tu. 1, 
Tu. Th. F. 11, lab. M. 1-3, F. 3-5, Tu. 2-4. 

41 



N101. Farm Weeds and Seeds. Injurious weeds. Seed analysis and 
weed eradication. Labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 1; fee $1.00. 1st term. As ar- 
ranged. 

CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry Building-, General Office, Room 202 
Graduate Assistant, Anderegg 
N71. Agricultural Chemistry. Chemistry of the farm relating espe- 
cially to the elements essential to plant life and animal feeding. Rec. 
4; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $4.00. 1st term. M. Tu. W. Th. 8, lab. W. 
Th. 9-12. 

DAIRYING 

Associate Professor Goss 
N17. Principles of Dairying. Secretion and composition of milk; 
testing of dairy products; separation and care of "milk and cream; 
cheesemaking, buttermaking, and ice cream making. Rec. 6; labs. 2, 
3 hr.; credit 4; fee $2.00. 2d term. 8:00, lab. F. S. 9-12. 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE 

Associate Professor Harter, Agricultural Hall, Room 313 
N51. Farm Accounts. Inventories, crop and live stock accounts and 

their interpretation. Rec. 2; labs. 4, 2 hr.; credit 2 1 / z ; fee $1.50. 1st 

term. F. S. 8, M. Tu. W. Th. 10-12. 

N52. Farm Management. Factors influencing success in farming. 

Prerequisite N51. Rec. 6; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 4; fee $1.00. 1st term. 

9, lab. W. Th. 1-4. 

ENGLISH 

Associate Professor Cooper, Chemistry Building, Room 101 

N30a. The Practice of English. Training in note-taking and out- 
lining. Writing of business letters. Attention to clearness and cor- 
rectness of expression. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 8:00 or 9:00. 

N30b. Elementary Composition. Continuation of N30a. More em- 
phasis placed upon the theme. Description and narration. Rec. 6; 
credit 3. 1st term. 8:00. 

N30c. Rhetoric and Composition. Continuation of N30b. Longer 
themes pertaining to other college work; much oral composition. Em- 
phasis upon exposition. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 8:00 or 9:00. 

N42. English Classics. Study of masterpieces of literature. To de- 
velop appreciation of what is good, and a desire for wider reading. 
Prerequisites N30a, N30b, and N30c. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 9:00. 

FARM CROPS AND SOILS 

Associate Professor Vifquain, Agricultural Engineering Hall, Room 310 

FARM CROPS GROUP 

Nil. Corn Production. A thorough study of the crop, covering selec- 
tion and storage of seed, preparation of the seed for planting, growing, 
harvesting, marketing and market grades, uses, insects and diseases, 
adaptation, and judging and improvement. Rec. 4; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 
3; fee $1.50. 1st term. M. Tu. W. Th. 9, lab. M. Tu. 1-4. 

N12. Small Grain Production. Oats, wheat, barley, and rye; selection 
and preparation of seed for planting, growing, harvesting, marketing 
and market grading of small grains, uses, insects and diseases, adapta- 
tion, and judging and improvement. Rec. 4; labs. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3; 
fee $1.50. 2d term. M. Tu. W. Th. 11, Th. F. 1-4. 

SOILS GROUP 

N41. Soils. Their origin, classification and composition. Identifica- 
tion, mapping, and description of soil types. Soil rreas, types, and 
problems In [owa. Chem. N71 should be taken along with this course. 
Rec. 4; labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $1.50. 2d term. M. Tu. W. Th. 9, 
F. S. 0-12. 

N43. Soil Management. Application of soil fertility principles to the 
management of particular typea of soils, soil erosion; special soils; 
crop rotations, and drv farming. Rec. 4; credit 2. Prerequisite N42. 
1st term. at. Tu. W. Th. 7. 

42 



N45. Soil Field Experiments. A study of the results of the soil field 
experiments of Iowa and their application to different types of Iowa 
soils and to the home farm. Rec. 4; credit 2. Prerequisite N42. 1st 
term. Tu. W. Th. S. 11. 

HORTICULTURE 

Professor Cunningham, Agricultural Engineering- Hall, Room 301 

Hort. N75b. Small Fruits. Rec. 4; labs. 2, 2 hr.; credit 2%; fee $1.00. 
1st term. F. S. 9, M. W. 10, lab. W. 3-5, and 2 hrs. as arranged. 

N76. Fruit Growing and Plant Propagation. Rec. 4; labs. 4, 3 hr. ; 
credit 4: fee $2.00. 2d term. W. Th. F. S. 8, M. Tu. Th. 1-4 and 3 hrs. 
as arranged. 

N202. Advanced Vegetable Gardening-. Prerequisite N201. Rec. 4; 
labs. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $2.00. 2d term. M. Tu. W. Th. 10, lab. W. 
F. 1-4. 

MATHEMATICS 

Assistant Professor Herr, Agricultural Engineering Hall, Room 102 

N31a. Agricultural Arithmetic. Principles of arithmetic needed in the 
practical problems of farm management. Rec. 6; credit 3. 1st term. 8:00. 

N35a. Plane Geometry. Prerequisite N37a. Rec. 5 through both 
terms. Credit 2y 2 each term. 1st and 2d terms. M. Tu. W. Th. F. 7. 

N35b. Plane Geometry. Rec. 4 through both terms. Credit 2 each 
term. 1st and 2d terms. M. Tu. W. Th. 7. 

X37a, N37b. Algebra Through Simultaneous Equations. Designed for 
students who have had no previous work in algebra. Rec. 5 through 
both terms. Credit 2% each term. 1st and 2d terms. M. Tu. W. Th. 
F. 11:00. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING (For Men) 

Office, Gymnasium, Room 202 
DESCRIPTION OF STUDIES 

NIOa. Physical Training. Elementary floor tactics: calisthenics; 
gymnastics; swimming; outdoor and indoor games and athletics. Effi- 
ciency lectures. Labs. 4, 1 hr., required; fee $1.00 each quarter. 1st 
term. M. Tu. W. Th. 11. 

Xlla. Physical Training. Continuation of NIOc. Labs. 2, 1 hr. ; fee 
$1.00 each quarter. 1st term. M. W. 11. 

X12a, N12b, N12c. Theory and Practice of Coaching. Theory of play, 
sportsmanship, rules, training; physiology; anatomy, hygiene; actual 
competition, actual coaching. Lect. 2; labs. 4, 2 hr.; credit 2 each 
quarter. 1st term. (N12a, N12c) 8:00-10:00. (N12b) 10:00-12:00. 

TRADES AND INDUSTRIES 

Professor Shane, Transportation Building, Room 202 

CIVIL. ENGINEERING SUBJECTS 
C.N3. Strength of Materials. The physical properties of materials 
used in construction, with special attention to computing beams, col- 
umns, shafting and machine parts, and familiarizing the student with 
the use of the hand-book. Rec. 4 through both terms; credit 2 each 
term; 1st and 2d terms. M. Tu. Th. F. 10. 

ELECTRICAL, SUBJECTS 

E.N2. Electric Wiring. A practical course in wiring of dwellings 
and buildings for light and power, including a study of code rules. 
Labs. 2, 3 hr. through both terms; credit 1 each term; fee $2.00. 1st 
and 2d terms. F. S. 2-5. 

E.N3. "Wiring Plans and Estimates. Laying out wiring plans for 
buildings and estimating costs. Use of supply catalogs. Labs. 2, 3 hr. 
through both terms; credit 1 each term. 1st and 2d terms. Tu. Th. 8-11. 

E.N4. Electricity and Magnetism. The principles of electricity and 
magnetism as a preparatory course for two-year electrical students. 
Prerequisites Math. N37a. N37b and Phys. Nl. Rec. 4; lab. 1, 3 hr. 
through both terms; credit 2% each term. 1st and 2d terms. M. Tu. 
W. Th. F. 11. 

E.N5. Direct Current Machinery. Fundamental theory, operation, 
and maintenance of direct current machines and the distributing sys- 

43 



tems with which they are operated. Prerequisite E.N4. Rec. 5 through 
both terms; credit 2% each term. 1st and 2d terms. M. T. W. Th. F. 1. 

E.N6a. Electric Shop. Repair and construction of electrical appa- 
ratus and machines. Switchboard wiring-. Prerequisites E.N4 and clas- 
sification in E.N5. Labs. 2, 3 hr. through both terms; credit 1 each 
term; fee $5.00. 1st and 2d terms. M. W. 2-5. 

E.N8a. Alternating Current Machinery. Fundamental theory, opera- 
tion, and care of alternating current machinery. Prerequisite E.N5. 
Rec. 5 through both terms; credit 2^2 each term. 1st and 2d terms. 
M. Tu. W. Th. F. 11. 

E.N20a, E.N20b. Auto Electrotechnics. (For regular automobile stu- 
dents.) Elements of electricity and magnetism as applied to the igni- 
tion, starting, and lighting systems of motor vehicles. Practical work 
in making connections, repairs, and adjustments. 6 hrs. per day, 5% 
days per week for 4 weeks; credit 3. 6 hrs. per day, 5y 2 days per week 
for 3 weeks; credit 2. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

E. N20c. Auto Electrotechnics. (For Two-Year Electrical students.) 
A briefer course of E. N20a and 20b. Labs. 2, 3 hr., through both terms; 
credit 1 each term; fee $5.00. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

E. N21. Storage Battery Laboratory. Practical maintenance, repair, 
rebuilding, and connecting up of storage batteries for automobile use. 
Commercial methods of testing and charging. 6 hrs. per day, 5y 2 days 
per week for 4 weeks; credit 3. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

MECHANICAL SUBJECTS 

M. Nla, M. Nib, M. Nlc. Mechanical Drafting. Use of drafting in- 
struments, lettering, and line practice, principles of projective drawing, 
sketching, and the making of simple drawing-. Labs. 2, 3 hr. through 
both terms; credit 1 each term. 1st and 2d term. (M. Nla) M. F. 1-4, 
(M. Nib) Tu. S. 1-4, (M. Nlc) W. Th. 1-4. 

M. N2a, M. N2b. M. N2c. Shop Work. Woodworking. Use. sharpening 
and adjustment of hand tools; elementary framing- and joinery; wood 
turning, use of power tools and principles of buikung construction. 
Labs. 2, 3 hr. through both terms; credit 1 each term; fee $5.00 each 
term-. 1st and 2d terms. (M. N2a) Tu. Th. 2-5, (M. N2b) M. W. 2-5, 
(M. N2c) W. F. 2-5. 

M. N4a. Steam Boilers. Types, construction, and operation of steam 
boilers and auxiliary apparatus for power plants; boiler feed water, 
fuels, methods of firing, combustion and practical problems involving 
the properties of steam. Prerequisites M. N12a and Phys. Nl. Rec. 3 
through both terms; credit IV2 each term. 1st and 2d terms. M. W. 
F. 10. 

M. N6a, N6b. Mechanical Drafting. Machine detailing, gears, cams, 
and assembled drawings; general drafting room practice. Prerequisite 
M. Nlc. Labs. 2, 3 hr. through both terms; credit 1 each term. 1st 
and 2d terms. (M. N6a) Tu. S. 9-12, (M. N6b) Tu. Th. 1-4. 

M. N7a, N7b, N7c. Machine Shop. The use of hand tools, chipping, 
filling, scraping, and pipe fitting; operation of power tools, such as the 
lathe, shaper, drill press, etc. Labs. 2, 3 hr. through both terms; credit 
1 each term; fee $3.00 each quarter. 1st and 2d terms. Lab. as arranged 
8-12, 1-5, except Saturday. 

M. N9. Heating and Ventilation. Private dwellings, schools, and 
other public buildings. Rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. through both terms; credit 
1% each term. 1st and 2d terms. M. Th. 4, W. 2-5. 

\1. X Mi. Shop Mechanics. Elementary applied mechanics dealing 
with practical problems of the mechanical trades. Rec. 3 through both 
terms; credit 1 Vj each term; correspondence fee $10.00. 1st and 2d 
terms. M. Tu. Th. 9. 

M. Nir>. Special AVork. The laboratory work of the last quarter for 
mechanical students allows for specialization in the drafting room, 
Shop, or laboratory. Labs. 5, 3 hr. through both terms; credit 2 J / 2 each 
term; fee as arranged. 1st and 2d terms. 9-12, except Saturday. 

PHYSIOS 

Phys. Nl. Elementary Physics. As applied to mechanics, heat, sound 
and light, and electricity and magnetism. Rec. 3; lab. 1, 3 hr. through 
both terms; credit 2 each term; fee $1.00. 1st and 2d terms. M. Tu. 
Th I-'. 11. 

M. N21. Automobile I.ahorafory. Practical construction, maintenance, 
repair, rebuilding and operating the several types of automobiles and 

trucks, f; hrs. per day for 4 weeks; credit 3. 1st. and 2d terms. As 
nrranged. 

44 



M. N22. Auto Engine Laboratory. Construction, trouble finding, re- 
pairing, rebuilding- and operating- the several types of automobile and 
truck engines. 6 hrs. per day, 5% days per week for 4 weeks; credit 
3. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

Iff. N23. Oxy-Acetylene AVelding. The practical brazing, soldering, 
cutting and welding of metals bv the use of the o\y-acetvlene torch. 
Methods used, composition of metals and use of fluxes. 6 hrs. per day 
for 3 weeks; credit 2%. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 

M. N24. Auto Machine Shop. Practical shop work on the bench, lathe, 
shaper. grinder, milling machine and drill press, as it relates to auto- 
mobile repairing. 6 hrs. per day for 3 weeks; credit 2%. 1st and 2d 
terms. As arranged. 

Bff. N25. Commercial Auto Practice. The practical overhauling and 
repairing of motor vehicles under commercial conditions. 3 hrs. per 
day, 5Vi days per week for 12 weeks; credit 5. 1st and 2d terms. As 
arranged. 

STRUCTURAL SUBJECTS 

S. Nla, S. Nib. Structural Drafting. Details of trame, steel,, brick, 
and tile buildings; structural details of bridges, miscellaneous steel 
framing and reinforced concrete. Prerequisite M. Nla. Labs. 2, 3 hr. 
through both terms; credit 1 each term. 1st and 2d terms. (S. Nla) 
M. F. 1-4, (S. Nib) M. W. 1-4. 

S. N2a, S. N2b. Structural Drafting. Scale building plans, specifica- 
tions, parallel and angular perspective, shades and shadows, and ren- 
dering. Labs. 2, 3 hr. through both terms; credit 1 es\ch term. 1st and 
2d terms. (S. N2a) W. S. 9-12, (S. N2b) M. F. 9-12. 

S. N7. Special Work. The laboratory work of the last quarter for 
structural students allows for specialization in the drafting room, shop, 
or laboratory. Labs. 4, 3 hr. through both terms; credit 1% each term; 
fee as arranged. 1st and 2d terms. W. S. 9-12. 

ZOOLOGY AND ENTOMOLOGY 

Associate Professor Paddock, Science Building, Room 10 

Nl. Elementary Beekeeping. Beginning course giving history of 
beekeeping, evolution of hives, biology of the colony and elementary 
behavior. Rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $3.00. 1st term. M. Tu. 
W. Th. 7, M. Tu. 9-12. 

N2. Fall Management. Fundamental principles of apiary manage- 
ment for this season of the vear. Prereqirs^p N 1 . ^ec. 4: in^. 2, 3 hr. ; 
credit 3; fee $3.00. 2d term. M. Tu. W. Th. 8, lab. F. S. 9-12. 

N4. General Apiculture. Elementary course on bee behavior, life 
history, the use of apiarv eauiDment, and methods of manap-ement. 
Prerequisite Nl. Rec. 2; lab. 1, 3 hr. (For 6 weeks.) Credit iy 2 ; fee 
$2.00. 2d term. 

N8. Honey Production. Management for both comb and extracted 
honey production. Prereqvn'«itp Nl. Ren. 4; lab. 2. 3 hr.: credit 3; fee 
$3.00. 1st term, M. Tu. W. Th. 8, lab. F. S. 9-12. 2d term, M. Tu. W. Th. 
7, M. Tu. 9-12. 

N9. Out Apiaries. Special practices involved in work with outyards. 
Prerequisite Nl. Rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr.; credit 3; fee $5.00. 2d term. 

Nl3a, N13b. Queen Rearing. Races of bees, heredity and methods 
of raising queens. Prerequisite Nl. Rec. 4; lab. 2, 3 hr. ; credit 3; fee 
$5.00 each term. 1st and 2d terms. As arranged. 



rfff mm p f T!fE 

Jan a mi 



THE COLLEGE 

The Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts conducts 
work in five major lines : 

Agriculture 
Engineering 
Home Economics 
Industrial Science 
Veterinary Medicine 

The Graduate College conducts advanced research and gives instruction 
in all these five lines. 

Four-year, five-year, and six-year collegiate courses are offered in dif- 
ferent divisions of the College. Non-collegiate courses are offered in 
agriculture, home economics, and trades and industries. Summer Sessions 
include graduate, collegiate, and non-collegiate work. Short courses are 
offered in the winter. 

Extension courses are conducted at various points throughout the state. 

Research work is conducted in the Agricultural and Engineering Ex- 
periment Stations and in the Veterinary Research Laboratory. 

Special announcements of the different branches of the work are sup- 
plied, free of charge, on application. 

Address The Registrar, 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE, 
Ames. Iowa. 



3 7 5^^ 



O^ 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

OF AGRICULTURE 

AND MECHANIC ARTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



SUMMER SESSION- 1923 



4/u 



" %u 




$ 



VOL. XXI NO. 35 JANUARY 31, 1923, AMES. IOWA 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



3 0112 111987753